‘Everything Everywhere All At Once’ wins best picture at the Oscars, dominating ceremony with 7 wins

‘Everything Everywhere All At Once’ wins best picture at the Oscars, dominating ceremony with 7 wins
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Michelle Yeoh (left) accepts the award for best actress in a leading role for "Everything Everywhere All at Once" and Brendan Fraser for best actor for "The Whale" at the Oscars on March 12, 2023, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. (AP & Reuters photos))
‘Everything Everywhere All At Once’ wins best picture at the Oscars, dominating ceremony with 7 wins
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Michelle Yeoh, Theresa Steele Page, Jamie Lee Curtis, James Hong, Tallie Medel and Stephanie Hsu accept the Best Picture award for "Everything Everywhere All at Once" during the 95th Annual Academy Awards on March 12, 2023 in Hollywood, California. (Getty Images/AFP)
‘Everything Everywhere All At Once’ wins best picture at the Oscars, dominating ceremony with 7 wins
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Jamie Lee Curtis (left) and Ke Huy Quan won supporting acting awards for the indie hit “Everything Everywhere All at Once” at the 95th Academy Awards on Sunday. (A.M.P.A.S./Handout via REUTERS)
‘Everything Everywhere All At Once’ wins best picture at the Oscars, dominating ceremony with 7 wins
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Host Jimmy Kimmel speaks onstage during the 95th Annual Academy Awards at Dolby Theatre on March 12, 2023 in Hollywood, California. (Getty Images/AFP)
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Updated 13 March 2023

‘Everything Everywhere All At Once’ wins best picture at the Oscars, dominating ceremony with 7 wins

‘Everything Everywhere All At Once’ wins best picture at the Oscars, dominating ceremony with 7 wins
  • Malaysia's Michelle Yeoh becomes the first Asian woman to best actress
  • Best actor went to Brendan Fraser for his role as reclusive professor in “The Whale"

LOS ANGELES: “Everything Everywhere All At Once” came in the Oscar favorite, and it’s winning like one, too. Michelle Yeoh, Ke Huy Quan and Jamie Lee Curtis all won acting honors Sunday while the filmmaking duo known as the Daniels, Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert won for both directing and original screenplay.

Yeoh became the first Asian woman to best actress, taking the award for her lauded performance in “Everything Everywhere All at Once.” The 60-year-old Malaysian-born Yeoh won her first Oscar for a performance that relied as much on her comic and dramatic chops as it did her kung fu skills. She’s the first best actress win for a non-white actress in 20 years.

“Ladies, don’t let anyone ever tell you you’re past your prime,” said Yeoh, who received a raucous standing ovation.




Yeoh became the first Asian woman to best actress. (AFP)

In winning best director, the Daniels — both 35 years old — won for just their second and decidedly un-Oscar bait feature. They’re just the third directing pair to win the award, following Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins (“West Side Story”) and Joel and Ethan Coen (“No Country for Old Men”). Scheinert dedicated the award “to the moms of the world.”

Best actor went to Brendan Fraser, culminating the former action star’s return to center stage for his physical transformation as a 600-lb. reclusive professor in “The Whale.” The best-actor race had been one of the closest contests of the night, but Fraser in the end edged Austin Butler.

“So this is what the multiverse looks like,” said a clearly moved Fraser, pointing to the “Everything Everywhere All at Once” crew.




CaptionBest actor went to Brendan Fraser. (AFP)

The former child star Quan capped his own extraordinary comeback with the Oscar for best supporting actor for his performance in the indie hit “Everything Everywhere All at Once.”

Quan, beloved for his roles as Short Round in “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” and Data in “Goonies,” had all but given up acting before being cast in “Everything Everywhere All at Once.”

His win, among the most expected of the night, was nevertheless one of the ceremony’s most moving moments. The audience — including his “Temple of Doom” director, Steven Spielberg — gave Quan a standing ovation as he fought back tears.

“Mom, I just won an Oscar!” said Quan, 51, whose family fled Vietnam in the war when he was a child.




US-Vietnamese actor Ke Huy Quan, winner of the Oscar for Best Actor in a Supporting Role for "Everything Everywhere All at Once", attends the 95th Annual Academy Awards. (AFP) 

“They say stories like this only happen in the movies. I can’t believe it’s happening,” said Quan. “This is the American dream.”

Minutes later, Quan’s castmate Jamie Lee Curtis won for best supporting actress. Her win, in one of the most competitive categories this year, denied a victory for comic-book fans.

Angela Bassett (“Black Panther: Wakanda Forever”) would have been the first performer to win an Oscar for a Marvel movie.

It also made history for Curtis, a first-time winner who alluded to herself as “a Nepo baby” during her win at the Screen Actors Guild Awards. She’s the rare Oscar winner whose parents were both Oscar nominees, something she emotionally referenced in her speech. Tony Curtis was nominated for “The Defiant Ones” in 1959 and Janet Leigh was nominated in 1961 for “Psycho.” Curtis thanked “hundreds” of people who put her in that position.




US actress and author Jamie Lee Curtis poses with the Oscar for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for "Everything Everywhere All at Once" in the press room during the 95th Annual Academy Awards. (AFP)

The German-language WWI epic “All Quiet on the Western Front” — Netflix’s top contender this year — took four awards as the academy heaped honors on the craft of the harrowing anti-war film. It won for cinematography, production design, score and best international film.

Though Bassett missed on supporting actress, Ruth E. Carter won for the costume design of “Wakanda Forever,” four years after becoming the first Black designer to win an Oscar, for “Black Panther.” This one makes Carter the first Black woman to win two Oscars.

“Thank you to the Academy for recognizing the superhero that is a Black woman,” said Carter. “She endures, she loves, she overcomes, she is every woman in this film.”
Carter dedicated the award to her mother, who she said died last week at 101.




US costume designer Ruth E. Carter accepts the Oscar for Best Costume Design for "Black Panther: Wakanda Forever" onstage during the 95th Annual Academy Awards. (AFP)

The telecast, airing live on ABC, opened traditionally: with a montage of the year’s films (with Kimmel edited into a cockpit in “Top Gun: Maverick“) and a lengthy monologue. Kimmel, hosting for the third time, didn’t dive right into revisiting Will Smith’s slap of Chris Rock at last year’s ceremony.
The late-night comedian struggled to find lessons from last year’s incident, which was followed by Smith winning best actor. If anyone tried any violence this year, Kimmel said, “you will be awarded the Oscar for best actor and permitted to give a 19-minute-long speech.”
But Kimmel, hosting for the third time, said anyone who wanted to “get jiggy with it” this year will have to come through a fearsome battalion of bodyguards, including Michael B. Jordan, Michelle Yeoh, Steven Spielberg and his show’s “security guard” Guillermo Rodriguez.
After landmark wins for Chloé Zhao (“Nomadland“) and Jane Campion (“The Power of the Dog“), no women were nominated for best director. Sarah Polley, though, won best adapted screenplay for the metaphor-rich Mennonite drama “Women Talking.”




Best Adapted Screenplay winner for "Women Talking," Sarah Polley is seen backstage during the 95th Annual Academy Awards. (AFP)

“Thank you to the academy for not being mortally offended by the words ‘women’ and ‘talking,’” said Polley.
Daniel Roher’s “Navalny,” about the imprisoned Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, took best documentary. The film’s win came with clear overtones to Navalny’s ongoing imprisonment and Vladimir Putin’s continued war in Ukraine. Yulia Navalnaya joined the filmmakers on the stage.
“My husband is in prison just for telling the truth,” said Navalnaya. “Stay strong my love.”
Some big names weren’t in attendance for other reasons. Neither Tom Cruise, whose “Top Gun: Maverick” is up for best picture, nor James Cameron, director of best-picture nominee “Avatar: The Way of Water,” were at the ceremony. Both have been forefront in Hollywood’s efforts to get moviegoers back after years of pandemic.




Yulia Navalnaya attends the 95th Annual Academy Awards. (AFP)

“The two guys who asked us to go back to theater aren’t in the theater,” said Kimmel, who added that Cruise without his shirt on in “Top Gun: Maverick” was “L. Ron Hubba Hubba.”
After last year’s Oscars, which had stripped some categories from being handed out in the live telecast, the academy restored all awards to the show and leaned on traditional song and and dance numbers. That meant some show-stopping numbers, including the elastic suspenders dance of “Naatu Naatu” from the Telugu action-film sensation “RRR,” an intimate, impassioned performance by Lady Gaga of “Hold My Hand” from “Top Gun: Maverick,” and an Super Bowl follow-up by Rihanna. Best song went to “Naatu Naatu.”
It also meant a long show. “This kind of makes you miss the slapping a little bit, right?” Kimmel said mid-show.
The night’s first award went to “Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio” for best animated film. That handed Netflix its first Oscar in the category.
After last year’s slap, the academy created a crisis management team to better respond to surprises. Neither Rock, who recently made his most forceful statement about the incident in a live special, nor Smith, who was banned by the academy for 10 years, attended.




TV host Jimmy Kimmel speaks onstage during the 95th Annual Academy Awards. (AFP)

The Academy Awards is attempting to recapture some of its old luster. One thing working in its favor: This year’s best picture field was stacked with blockbusters. Ratings usually go up when the nominees are more popular, which certainly goes for “Top Gun: Maverick” and “Avatar: The Way of Water.”
Neither won much, though. “The Way of Water,” with more than $2.28 billion in box office, won for best visual effects. The “Top Gun” sequel ($1.49 billion), took best sound.
Last year, Apple TV’s “CODA” became the first streaming movie to win best picture. But this year, nine of the 10 best picture nominees were theatrical releases. After the movie business cratered during the pandemic, moviegoing recovered to about 67 percent of pre-pandemic levels. But it was an up and down year, full of smash hits and anxiety-inducing lulls in theaters.
This year, ticket sales have been strong thanks to releases like “Creed III” and “Cocaine Bear” — which made not one but two cameos at Sunday’s show. But there remain storm clouds on the horizon. The Writers Guild and the major studios are set to begin contract negotiations March 20, a looming battle that has much of the industry girding for the possibility of a work stoppage throughout film and television.
The Oscars, too, are seeking steadiness. Last year’s telecast drew 16.6 million viewers, a 58 percent increase from the scaled-down 2021 edition, watched by a record low 10.5 million.


Influencer-loved The Giving Movement goes luxe with new Ramadan collection  

Influencer-loved The Giving Movement goes luxe with new Ramadan collection  
Updated 27 March 2023

Influencer-loved The Giving Movement goes luxe with new Ramadan collection  

Influencer-loved The Giving Movement goes luxe with new Ramadan collection  

DUBAI: Founded by Dominic Nowell-Barnes, popular sustainable brand The Giving Movement — the UAE-born label known for disrupting the Middle East athleisure scene — has launched its Ramadan Collection featuring luxurious fabrics and timeless silhouettes.   

“Our collection is a futuristic and luxurious take on modest partywear special designed for the holy month of Ramadan. The fabrics are a mix of luxurious plisse and satin. We have created some beautiful showstopping pieces with special tassel trims as well as timeless all over monogram prints which were first initially showcased at Arab Fashion Week last year,” said Khairunisa Suhail, head of design at TGM, in an interview with Arab News.  

 

 

Suhail, who developed her design signature while working in the UK and Stockholm, brought her love for Scandinavian designs, streetwear and minimalist ideology to TGM, which is also reflected in this latest drop.  

“As well as the fabrics and trims being sustainable and the collection being made right here in the UAE, we have carefully designed each piece to be comfortable, elegant and regal. Each piece is specially designed to make you feel like royalty,” said Suhail.  

The Ramadan Collection features luxe fabrics like plisse and satin. (Supplied)

While the modest collection is specially made with Ramadan in mind, the pieces are diverse and inclusive and can be worn comfortably whether you are planning a trip to the beach or heading to a special iftar with friends and family, added Suhail.  

“We believe comfort goes hand in hand with style. Comfort is at the forefront of our thinking when designing as it’s an important USP of ours. We want you to be comfortable in our designs whilst looking and feeling your best,” she said.  

 

 

As a brand, TGM has also done its fair share of charity work, especially during Ramadan.   

“We are extremely proud and grateful to be able to give back whilst doing what we love. We donate to our two partnered charities, Harmony House and Dubai Cares. Internally, we also organize charitable events such as iftar box handouts where the full team will help towards this cause during Ramadan. Last year, we partnered with The Giving Family to do this,” said Suhail.  


With her Syrian heritage, designer Daniela Cassab is putting Mexican craftsmanship on the global map  

With her Syrian heritage, designer Daniela Cassab is putting Mexican craftsmanship on the global map  
Updated 27 March 2023

With her Syrian heritage, designer Daniela Cassab is putting Mexican craftsmanship on the global map  

With her Syrian heritage, designer Daniela Cassab is putting Mexican craftsmanship on the global map  

DUBAI: Mexican designer Daniela Cassab, whose grandparents migrated from Aleppo, Syria, knows how to make the perfect leather jacket. Founder and designer of her artisanal label, DanCassab, she specializes in handmade leather garments in Mexico designed to transcend seasons and pass down through generations.   

The designer was in Dubai earlier this year to launch her exclusive pop-up at THAT Concept Store. Arab News caught up with her to understand her love for outerwear and what goes behind creating each piece.  

 

 

 

Born and raised in Mexico, Cassab grew up around fashion. Her family has been in the textile industry, and her father's factories manufactured jeans for Guess and Marciano.   

After studying art history at the prestigious Parsons School of Design in New York, she moved back home and realized the possibility of starting a label that valued slow fashion and focused on preserving the heritage and crafts of her country.   

Mexican designer Daniela Cassab specializes in outerwear. (Supplied)

 In 2016, DanCassab was born, one of the pillars of the brand being her employment of highly skilled local artisans.  

 Her specialty? Outerwear — you always need a perfect jacket that you can wear with jeans and a silk dress,” she explained.  

 

 

 

One look at her bestselling Loretta jacket, and it's hard not to fall in love with its glamorous cowboy aesthetic, oversized collar and soft fringes. Inspired by traditional jackets called Cuera Tamaulipeca worn by hunters in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas, she explained that typically fringes were designed to shed rain.   

“Four years ago the government from Tamaulipas wanted to reinterpret the Cuera Tamaulipeca and asked me to do it in a more contemporary way. That’s how our Iconic ‘Loretta’ came to life, and it was a hit. That was the first piece that started the idea of fringes, and I also love the whole cowboy vibe,” she said. Each of her pieces is handmade from the finest leathers using traditional construction techniques and can take six-to-eight days to create. Elsewhere, her beaded fringed jackets are equally covetable – especially with their Rock'n'Roll vibe.   

Daniela Cassab describes her clothes as works of art – because of the time and dedication that goes behind them. (Supplied)

She describes her clothes as works of art – because of the time and dedication that goes behind them. “The beading takes hours as it's done by hand. Additionally, unlike other materials, leather has no give – if you stitch it the wrong way, you must go back and do it all over again.”   

When it comes to her Arab roots, the designer said her heritage inspires her work ethic.  

“My Arab roots inspire me in the business area, since I was very young I was able to see how my great grandparents and my grandparents who came from Syria started a business in a completely different country. They were very agile and used to selling textiles. It was their passion, they were capable of creating a very big textile empire that lasted for generations until today,” she said, adding: “This is how I learned the importance of working, of falling in love with your passion and what you desire… the perseverance and the way they communicated with clients was also special, it’s a magical approach that makes customers fall in love.” 


Sudan’s speciality ‘bittersweet’ Ramadan drink

In Sudan, the brew is so identified with Ramadan that even the US embassy took to Twitter to promote its staff making it.
In Sudan, the brew is so identified with Ramadan that even the US embassy took to Twitter to promote its staff making it.
Updated 26 March 2023

Sudan’s speciality ‘bittersweet’ Ramadan drink

In Sudan, the brew is so identified with Ramadan that even the US embassy took to Twitter to promote its staff making it.
  • In Sudan, the arduously made “helo-murr,” which means “bittersweet,” is a drink synonymous with Ramadan
  • It can be found on almost every table across the northeast African country at the end of the day’s fast

OM ESHR, Sudan: As generations of Sudanese have done before her, Wissal Abdel Ghany crouched next to a fire to prepare a traditional drink, a thirst-quenching favorite enjoyed during the fasting month of Ramadan.
In Sudan, the arduously made “helo-murr,” which means “bittersweet,” is a drink synonymous with the Islamic holy month.
It can be found on almost every table across the northeast African country at the end of the day’s fast.
“Without it, our table feels empty,” said Abdel Ghany, wearing a bright orange headscarf.
She sat in a small room in the village of Om Eshr, on the outskirts of the capital Khartoum, which teemed with a small force of women busily scraping and spreading a mixture before serving the beverage in clear glasses.
The drink has satisfied thirsty fasters for decades and recipes are “inherited from our mothers and grandmothers,” the 43-year-old said.
Corn is harvested and left to dry in the sun before being ground and mixed with spices such as fenugreek, cumin or even hibiscus — Sudan’s other essential Ramadan beverage.
This mixture is then soaked in sugar and water for several days.
Abdel Ghany spread a layer of the thick brown paste over a grill plate above the coals of a wood fire, cooking it into a thin, leather-colored film.
The resulting crepe-like layer is then peeled away and stored — ready to be soaked in the final step to create the beloved drink.
Served as cold as possible, the drink is one of many ways that fasting Sudanese cool off, a significant challenge in one of the world’s hottest countries.
The daytime fasting month of Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam.
Observant Muslims refrain from eating and drinking from dawn to dusk, after which they traditionally gather with family and friends to break their fast.
In Sudan, the brew is so identified with Ramadan that even the US embassy took to Twitter to promote its staff making it, with diplomats wielding wooden spoons over embers and sipping the amber liquid.
Abdel Ghany said preparing the drink is a collective effort, bringing “together our sisters and friends.”
“We make it together to share among ourselves,” she said.
In Sudan’s cities, she added, some people don’t make it themselves.
“But they still have to offer it for dinner, so they buy it ready-made,” she said.
For Abdel Ghany, the preparation of helo-murr and the holy month cannot be separated.
“All it takes is a whiff of the scent coming out of a home to know that Ramadan is here,” she said.


London’s Victoria & Albert Museum hosts ‘open iftar’ for hundreds

London’s Victoria & Albert Museum hosts ‘open iftar’ for hundreds
Updated 26 March 2023

London’s Victoria & Albert Museum hosts ‘open iftar’ for hundreds

London’s Victoria & Albert Museum hosts ‘open iftar’ for hundreds

DUBAI: More than 500 people flocked to London’s Victoria and Albert Museum on Friday for an ‘Open Iftar’ event organized by the Ramadan Tent Project charity.

“Ramadan 2023 marks 10 phenomenal years of the Ramadan Tent Project and our signature Open Iftar events. Over the past nine years, our humble tent on a patch of green grew and grew, before it traveled to landmark locations,” the project said.

Similar events will take place this year at Shakespeare’s Globe theater, Wembley Stadium, Chelsea’s Stamford Bridge stadium and the Royal Albert Hall.

“The theme to mark our 10-year anniversary is ‘Belonging’. For the past decade we’ve connected and convened over half a million people from all backgrounds. Our passion in bridging between different communities is rooted in sharing our authentic selves with the world. 

“True belonging shouldn’t require you to change who you are – rather, it’s to celebrate who you are,” read an additional statement on the website.

Since 2013, the Open Iftar events have hosted more than 500,000 people across the UK at some of the country’s most iconic cultural spaces including Trafalgar Square, the BALTIC Museum, Bradford’s Centenary Square and Coventry Cathedral.
 


Lebanese designer Zuhair Murad strikes again with second custom look for Taylor Swift on ‘Eras’ tour 

Lebanese designer Zuhair Murad strikes again with second custom look for Taylor Swift on ‘Eras’ tour 
Updated 26 March 2023

Lebanese designer Zuhair Murad strikes again with second custom look for Taylor Swift on ‘Eras’ tour 

Lebanese designer Zuhair Murad strikes again with second custom look for Taylor Swift on ‘Eras’ tour 

DUBAI: After revealing that he designed US pop sensation Taylor Swift’s showstopping ballgown for the “The Eras Tour” just last week, Lebanese couturier Zuhair Murad is back with yet another unique look for her latest stop in Las Vegas.  

The 33-year-old wore a shimmering dark blue outfit, with embellishment and fringe detailing, paired with knee-high boots. 

“@TaylorSwift wore for The Eras Tour Las Vegas Opening Night a custom #ZMCouture midnight blue crystal embellished bodysuit, overflowing with richly beaded fringes and a matching garter,” posted the label’s official Instagram account, sharing a picture of the glittering outfit.  

The Grammy Award-winning singer -- who kicked off her first trek in more than four years at Glendale, Arizona's State Farm Stadium last weekend -- belted out her top hits at the Allegiant Stadium in Las Vegas on Friday and Saturday in a three-hour show  that ran through hits from every era of her 17-year career. 

At the Glendale concert, Swift donned a custom-made gown by Murad in a peachy hue with starburst sequin work across the length of the creation.