Britain’s ‘coronation quiche’ gets a Middle Eastern twist to celebrate historic event

Britain’s ‘coronation quiche’ gets a Middle Eastern twist to celebrate historic event
The royal household chose quiche as the coronation dish because it is considered a good ‘sharing’ dish to take to a street party and can be served hot or cold. (AFP/ Supplied)
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Updated 08 May 2023
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Britain’s ‘coronation quiche’ gets a Middle Eastern twist to celebrate historic event

Britain’s ‘coronation quiche’ gets a Middle Eastern twist to celebrate historic event
  • Dubai chefs concoct Middle Eastern version of royal dish on occasion of Charles’s accession to British throne
  • The quiche is a nod to coronation chicken, a dish which was invented for the 1953 coronation of Queen Elizabeth II

DUBAI: The Arab world is gearing up to celebrate the coronation of King Charles III and Queen Camilla, with regional chefs preparing an Arab twist on the couple’s chosen coronation dish, a special quiche.

The dish, featuring spinach, broad beans and tarragon, is a nod to coronation chicken, a curry and mayonnaise-based dish which was invented for the 1953 coronation of Charles’ mother Queen Elizabeth II that is still enjoyed today.




Britain’s King Charles III (R) and Britain’s Camilla, Queen Consort arrive for the Easter Mattins Service at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle on April 9, 2023. (AFP)

Coronation chicken, created by Cordon Bleu-trained chef Rosemary Hume, was named the “poulet Reine Elizabeth” and consists of cold poached chicken in a sauce made from red wine, mayonnaise, whipped cream, apricot purée and a touch of curry powder.

By the 1980s, an easier to make version of coronation chicken salad had become ubiquitous in Britain, found in ready-made sandwiches at many local stores across the country.

Now, cold shredded chicken, mayonnaise and a healthy heaping of curry powder are considered a staple form of the dish, while some recipes call for raisins and mango chutney for a sweet kick.




Coronation chicken vol-au-vents are served at a reception for Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II with representatives from local community groups to celebrate the start of the Platinum Jubilee on February 5, 2022. (AFP)

As the UK celebrates the new monarch, the royal household is hoping the “coronation quiche” will prove equally popular 70 years on.

Quiche was chosen because it is considered a good “sharing” dish to take to a street party and can be served hot or cold.

The palace said on its website that the dish had been chosen personally by Charles and Camilla, and was “easily adapted to different tastes and preferences,” presenting it as a recipe for hundreds of community lunches planned across the country to mark the May 6 event.

“A deep quiche with a crisp, light pastry case and delicate flavors of spinach, broad beans and fresh tarragon. Eat hot or cold with a green salad and boiled new potatoes,” said the recipe on the royal family’s website, which accompanied a video clip featuring a royal chef preparing the dish.




Marwan Sardouk has culinary experience that spans over 15 years. (Supplied)

Lebanese chef Marwan Sardouk, with culinary experience spanning 15 years, and chef Shelton D’Souza, of Dubai’s FireLake Grill House at the Radisson Blu hotel, have added an Arab twist to the dish.

Sardouk’s recipe, created for TV channel Fatafeat, is good for two to four people.

Sardouk’s quiche recipe:




Croque Madame in Quiche by Lebanese chef Marwan Sardouk. (Supplied)

Ingredients:

For the Mornay sauce:

1 tablespoon butter

1 tablespoon all-purpose flour

2/3 cup whole milk

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/4 cup shredded Gruyere Cheese

For the Croque madam:

300 grams quiche dough

2 tablespoon butter, softened

2 teaspoon whole grain mustard

1/2 cups mornay sauce

6 thin slices turkey ham

1 cup shredded gruyere, divided

For the egg:

1 tablespoon butter

2 large eggs

Salt flakes, for sprinkling

Freshly ground black pepper, as needed

Method:

For the Mornay:

Make the roux and add milk and salt and pepper as flavoring.

For the Croque madame:

Roll the dough on a flat surface with a rolling pin.

Shape it into a tall pie using a round ring mold.

Place all the filling and cover it with the remaining dough.

Bake it at 180 C for 15 to 20 minutes or until the dough is golden and comes loose from the ring mold.

Fry the eggs in a frying pan with butter and season it with salt.

Set aside the fried eggs for later use.

To finish off, place the egg on top of the pastry and garnish as you like.

D’Souza’s quiche recipe

This recipe serves four people.




Dubai’s FireLake Grill House in Radisson Blu hotel will served the dish at the eatery on coronation day from 1 to 4 p.m. (Supplied)

Ingredients

For the quiche mix:

300 grams spinach (cleaned, blanched and chopped)

25 grams of white onion (chopped)

5 grams of garlic (finely chopped)

140 grams of akawi cheese (grated)

30 grams of gruyere cheese

For the quiche pastry:

200 grams of flour T55

200 grams of butter

1 pasteurized egg white

30 grams of dry zaatar powder

10 grams of salt

25 milliliters of water

For the quiche custard:

200 milliliters of milk

100 milliliters of cooking cream

2 eggs

2 grams of cinnamon powder

5 grams of salt

2 grams of black pepper




Chef Shelton D’Souza at Dubai’s FireLake Grill House’s recipie serves four people. (Supplied)

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 162 C. Prepare the quiche dough then mix all the ingredients together and make a dough. Roll out the dough into a pie mold. Line a pie dish with short crust pastry, cutting off any excess and pinching the edges. Prick the bottom and all over the side. Bake the crust for 10 to 12 minutes until it becomes light brown.

In a medium frying pan, melt the butter over medium heat. Saute the garlic and onion in butter for about five minutes until lightly browned.

Add the blanched and chopped spinach. Taste the mixture then wait for it to cool before adding the akawi cheese. Season the mixture with salt and pepper. Spoon the mixture into the prepared pastry-lined dish.

In a medium bowl, whisk the custard mix. Season it with salt and pepper. Pour it into the pastry base, allowing the egg mixture to thoroughly combine with the spinach mixture.

Bake in a preheated oven for 15 minutes. Bake an additional 35 minutes, until it is set in the center. Allow the dish to cool for five minutes before serving.

 


White Milano hosts gala event with Saudi 100 Brands initiative

White Milano hosts gala event with Saudi 100 Brands initiative
Updated 21 September 2023
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White Milano hosts gala event with Saudi 100 Brands initiative

White Milano hosts gala event with Saudi 100 Brands initiative

DUBAI: White Milano, the international apparel and accessories trade show which famously takes place alongside Milan Fashion Week, and the Saudi 100 Brands project - an initiative by the Saudi Fashion Commission – hosted a gala event on Wednesday against the backdrop of the historic Palazzo Serbelloni in Milan.

A number of selected pieces from the collections of 40 Saudi fashion talents – ranging from couture, ready-to-wear fashion, handbags and footwear – were showcased at the event using scenography and choreography, and featuring dancers from the renowned La Scala Theatre.

Selected pieces from the collections of 40 Saudi fashion talents were showcased at the event using scenography and choreography, and featuring dancers from the renowned La Scala Theatre. (Supplied)

White Milano this week is welcoming the Saudi 100 Brands project as part of its EXPOWHITE program, taking place from Sept. 22-25.  

In line with its mission to foster a dialogue between the industry and global creative trends, the EXPOWHITE showcase will focus on brands and designers from countries like Saudi Arabia, Armenia, Brazil and South Africa.  

Guests at the event. (Supplied)

The Saudi 100 Brands project is an initiative by the Saudi Fashion Commission that supports established and emerging design talents from Saudi Arabia, who work across the ready-to-wear, modest, concept, premiere, demi-couture, bridal, bags and jewelry categories. 

The Saudi 100 Brands project showcase will be on display at the Padiglione Visconti.


Co-founder of Norway’s Masahat Festival on the challenges of adapting to a new culture 

Co-founder of Norway’s Masahat Festival on the challenges of adapting to a new culture 
Updated 21 September 2023
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Co-founder of Norway’s Masahat Festival on the challenges of adapting to a new culture 

Co-founder of Norway’s Masahat Festival on the challenges of adapting to a new culture 

LONDON: Norway’s Masahat Festival celebrates Arab culture across multiple genres and provides a platform for examining complex issues around history and identity.   

Attendees can listen to the mesmerizing vocals of Iraqi Egyptian Nadin Al-Khalidi, front singer of Tarraband, and participate in thought provoking seminars on topics such as “Pasts That Persist: Perspectives from Iraq and Palestine” and how to reclaim and take ownership of your own history after being written out of it for generations. Egyptian historian, Khaled Fahmy, Edward Keller Professor of North Africa and the Middle East at Tufts University, will speak on the latter subject.

Arab News spoke to Masahat’s Artistic Director Rana Issa to learn more about the aims and impact of the annual festival which she co-founded in 2015.   

Issa arrived in Norway from Lebanon in 2006. She had just completed her masters and proceeded to do her PhD at the University of Oslo. Today, she moves between Norway and Lebanon where she is an Assistant Professor of Translation Studies at the American University of Beirut. 

While her children are immersed in both Norwegian and Arab culture, for her, the experience of adapting to life in Norway has been more challenging.  

‘Once you leave your country you never really feel good again in a way because you become an exile. That never really leaves you. My parents are in Lebanon – my brother is in Dubai, my sister is in New York. That has a lot to do with how I perceive my life here.  

‘If I were to do it all over again, I wouldn’t have decided to leave Lebanon in that way. There’s something about leaving your homeland in haste that is quite traumatic. 

‘When I first came, I felt very lonely and this kind of loneliness I wouldn’t wish   even on my enemies,’ she said. 

In her work with Masahat, she is driven by a desire to help other minorities – not just Arab – to find their feet in their new homeland and to educate her fellow Norwegian citizens about Arab people.  

‘There’s a lot of misconceptions. They don’t, for example, understand that people can be Christian and living in the Middle East, and what they understand by Islam is so simplified and reductive,’ she said.  

Masahat is funded by the municipality of Oslo. “They pay our salaries and we get funding from other public bodies in Norway and have allies across cultural institutions and think tanks,” Issa explained.  

For those attending the festival, which runs from Sept. 21-24, the draw, says Issa, is the outstanding talent. 

‘The thing I love about Arab culture is how sophisticated it is. The reason why Masahat has been so successful in Norway is because the quality of our artists is really special,’ she said.  


Saudi Arabia’s Hia Hub lifestyle conference returns for third edition  

Saudi Arabia’s Hia Hub lifestyle conference returns for third edition  
Updated 21 September 2023
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Saudi Arabia’s Hia Hub lifestyle conference returns for third edition  

Saudi Arabia’s Hia Hub lifestyle conference returns for third edition  

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia’s fashion and lifestyle conference Hia Hub is set to return for its third edition taking place from Nov. 3-7 in Riyadh’s JAX District.  

Hia Hub will host discussions, masterclasses, workshops, interactive exhibitions and live performances. 

Last year’s edition featured a lineup of 13 talks and panels along with three masterclasses led by leaders in fashion and beauty such as image architect Law Roach, celebrity makeup artist Mary Phillips, supermodel and actress Amber Valetta, fashion designer Zac Posen and entrepreneur and digital influencer Karen Wazen.  

For the third edition, Hia Hub is joining forces with the Saudi Fashion Commission’s annual event Fashion Futures to expand the conference’s program.  

“It’s bigger and bolder this year, bringing together some of the regional and global fashion industry’s most accomplished business leaders, designers, celebrities, and icons, alongside leading fashion houses and brands,” said Mike Fairburn, managing director of SRMGx, the creators and organizers of Hia Hub and the experiential arm of SRMG.  

“It is a truly unique 5-day event – a dynamic programme of seminars, talks, workshops, masterclasses, and live performances – that blends the latest trends and perspectives in fashion, art, design, music and contemporary culture,” he added.  

Meanwhile, Burak Çakmak, CEO of the Saudi Fashion Commission, said: “With the return of Fashion Futures, we are taking another step towards driving the development of Saudi’s fast-emerging fashion industry, unlocking opportunities and supporting our most promising creative talents. We look forward to welcoming some of the best and brightest minds to join us at Hia Hub this November.” 


Imaan Hammam, Loli Bahia grace Fendi show during Milan Fashion Week

Imaan Hammam, Loli Bahia grace Fendi show during Milan Fashion Week
Updated 21 September 2023
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Imaan Hammam, Loli Bahia grace Fendi show during Milan Fashion Week

Imaan Hammam, Loli Bahia grace Fendi show during Milan Fashion Week

DUBAI: Part-Arab models Imaan Hammam and Loli Bahia this week walked Kim Jones’ runway for Fendi during Milan Fashion Week.  

The show was attended by A-list supermodels and celebrities including Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, Kate Moss, Demi Moore, Cristina Ricci, Gwendoline Christie and Naomi Watts, who sat front row.  

Jones’ collection for Fendi – unveiled during the first day of Milan Fashion Week – was a twist on knitwear, anchored by leather. 

Hammam donned a baby blue knit jumper, with a grey-purple blazer and grey tailored shorts. (Getty Images)

The first look set the tone: A form-hugging color-block knit dresses in mocha, baby blue, salmon and ivory, with a double sash trailing at the waist lending drama and movement. A tri-colored clutch gave the right accent. 

Hammam donned a baby blue knit jumper, with a grey-purple blazer and grey tailored shorts that were asymmetric from the brand’s Spring/Summer 2024 collection. She held a bright yellow clutch and wore hot red gloves.  

Bahia wore a long figure-hugging grey dress, with matching gloves, and black boots.   

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fendi (@fendi)

The collection overall was dainty: Knitwear was as a rule very fine, accented at times by thin golden chains creating details on open backs. Slinky, clinging monochrome knit dresses had peekaboo cutouts.  

The twinset trop gave way to built-in layers and sleeves that wrapped around the body, a mysterious swirl. Dresses ruched around the body, suggesting constant motion. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Fendi (@fendi)

A chunkier ribbed knit gave a chenille-soft appearance in a long jacket and skirt with a healthy front slit. Knit was also fashioned into a chainmail slip dress, with a coppery finish, or neon-orange wrap dress. 

Leather added substance: short color-block jackets paired with a matching knit mini-skirt.  

Contrasting gloves finished many looks. Bags were mostly held as if clutches; a tiny, flat bag dangled from gloved hands. 


Saudi designer Hala Abdullah: ‘I’m 100% driven by where I come from’

Saudi designer Hala Abdullah: ‘I’m 100% driven by where I come from’
Updated 21 September 2023
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Saudi designer Hala Abdullah: ‘I’m 100% driven by where I come from’

Saudi designer Hala Abdullah: ‘I’m 100% driven by where I come from’
  • Hala Abdullah discusses her new line of jewelry, ‘Foug,’ created in honor of National Day 

MARBELLA: In honor of Saudi Arabia’s National Day on Sept. 23, designer and entrepreneur Hala Abdullah has created a new fine jewelry collection, “Foug,” highlighting her country’s cultural heritage. Abdullah, who divides her time between the UAE and Saudi, founded her brand, Ofa, in 2017.  

“I am 100-percent driven by where I come from and the symbolism of Saudi, which I feel wasn’t as present in the world as it is right now,” Abdullah told Arab News. “This is my responsibility: I am from this country and I am representing it with my medium.”  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by OFA (@ofaofficial)

The collection’s green tones reference the Saudi flag, and “foug,” while it has several meanings to Abdullah, symbolizes optimism. The name is partially inspired by an old song by Saudi singer Mohammed Abdu, who, in a grand manner, begins one of his songs with this hopeful Arabic word.  

“He says ‘foug’ for so long. It’s a flashback from my childhood,” Abdullah said. “The meaning of it also resonates with the change happening in Saudi right now and the spirit of everyone there.” 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by OFA (@ofaofficial)

Studded with green onyx gemstones and diamonds, the designs that comprise “Foug” are simple, elegant, and geometrical. Abdullah was particularly influenced by the traditional, repetitive diamond- and triangle-shaped weaving patterns (‘Al-Sadu’ and ‘Al-Qatt Al-Asiri’ respectively) that have been embroidered in textiles in the northern and southern parts of the Kingdom. The compact collection contains rings, statement necklaces, and earrings, and are named after Saudi’s varying landscapes.  

“We’re not trying to play it safe,” said Abdullah. “We’re trying to make a statement with pieces that anyone can wear, not just Saudis.”  

While Abdullah’s pieces are delicate, it’s clear that she is a young woman with a strong personality. She’s something of her father’s daughter, and spent many years in Jeddah with an interest in architecture. “When I was a teenager, I was actually renovating my family’s house,” she said. “My dad was in real estate and I used to go with the workers and work with the cement. I would give them ideas, which they listened to. I gained confidence early on.”   

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by OFA (@ofaofficial)

One of her inspirations is the legendary Chinese folk heroine Hua Mulan (whose story was made famous through the 1998 Disney film), who courageously joined the army in her aged father’s stead by dressing as a male warrior, and ended up saving the emperor’s life.  

“It was never ‘Cinderella’ for me. I watched ‘Mulan’ more than 70 times,” Abdullah said. “Mulan was a powerful girl. Although she was pretty and delicate, she felt a sense of responsibility and duty for her country. She was strong and fearless and I related to that story more.”  

This partly inspired one of the earliest motifs for her brand: the Arabic sword, specifically its middle, cross-like intersecting part.  

Abdullah studied architecture at the Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles. The city proved to be an eye-opening experience compared to her life in Saudi to that point. “Everyone around me was very creative and looked very unique — blue hair, tattoos... it was a bit of a shock for me sometimes. But I was pushed to think outside the box and it was a really inspiring experience,” she said. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by OFA (@ofaofficial)

Ultimately, though, she decided against pursuing architecture as a career. “When you do architecture in the real world, there’s a lot of limitations,” she explained. “I found that jewelry was the same as architecture — the software, the process, the 3D printing — but minus the limitations.”  

She added that she felt something was missing when it came to jewelry design in the region. “It was either the big brands that everyone was wearing or the very traditional, gold souk-type of brands,” she explained. “I didn’t feel like there was a brand that I could relate to. That was what was lacking in the Arab world.” 

“Ofa” stands for the famous saying: ‘One for all, all for one.’ Unlike many homegrown Middle Eastern enterprises, Abdullah refrained from using her own name for her brand, instead adopting a more collective identity.  

“I wanted it be about community,” she said. “I think about it as a legacy and I see myself handing over to my kids one day. I’m really in it for the long run.”