Heritage Commission promotes Saudi Arabia’s rich history, traditions

Heritage Commission promotes Saudi Arabia’s rich history, traditions
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The Saudi Heritage Commission recently organized an event in Jeddah to promote awareness about the importance of the country’s history, culture and traditional art to its development. (AN Photo)
Heritage Commission promotes Saudi Arabia’s rich history, traditions
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The Saudi Heritage Commission recently organized an event in Jeddah to promote awareness about the importance of the country’s history, culture and traditional art to its development. (AN Photo)
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Updated 09 September 2023
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Heritage Commission promotes Saudi Arabia’s rich history, traditions

Heritage Commission promotes Saudi Arabia’s rich history, traditions
  • Jeddah event showcases diverse cultural heritage and supports local businesses
  • An antiquities area showcased key archaeological sites in Saudi Arabia

JEDDAH: The Saudi Heritage Commission recently organized an event in Jeddah to promote awareness about the importance of the country’s history, culture and traditional art to its development.
The three-day event was part of a series of heritage and cultural activities organized by the commission in different regions of the Kingdom.
It aimed to spotlight the nation’s diverse cultural heritage, promote its development and preserve it for future generations.
An antiquities area showcased key archaeological sites in Saudi Arabia and highlighted excavation methods and preservation techniques, while an intangible heritage zone featured the traditional seating area, Al-Majlis, and Saudi coffee.
Other attractions included a story-telling area, a photographic exhibition, folklore shows, handicraft pavilions and a heritage section.

HIGHLIGHT

More than 100 exhibitors participated in the cultural event, showcasing arts and crafts, traditional costumes, food stations and various other forms of traditions and culture.

The event also featured tourism and economic activities, with the goal of supporting local families and small businesses in the governorate. Temporary marketing outlets were set up at the event site to showcase and sell products from the businesses.
Falcons and their handlers were also present with the goal of raising awareness about the importance of falconry as a traditional and cultural art. Falconers introduced visitors to various sustainable hunting methods and emphasized the ethics of falconry.
The event also featured entertainment activities, including Saudi traditional games and competitions for children. Cultural activities and training sessions were also held to enrich children’s experiences and teach them handicraft methods.
More than 100 exhibitors participated in the cultural event, showcasing arts and crafts, traditional costumes, food stations and various other forms of traditions and culture.
Saeed Al-Adwani, 47, who visited the exhibition with his family, spoke to Arab News while watching the folklore show performed by a local band. He said: “It is an excellent opportunity for entertainment as well as learning about the rich cultural heritage of Saudi Arabia.”
Hazim Abdul Raoof, an Egyptian visitor who came with his family to the cultural area, expressed that the festival offered an opportunity to be immersed in Saudi heritage.
“My family and I found it very interesting, especially for the kids, to see how the previous generations of Saudi Arabia lived. What caught our attention were the arts, crafts, dances, and traditions.”
Zaki Abu Hussain, a resident of Makkah who was visiting Jeddah for the weekend, said: “It is a wonderful experience for both adults and young children to explore and learn about the history and heritage of Saudi Arabia through this immersive event.”
Hussain highlighted the significance of heritage as a special connection that bridges past, present and future. He said: “I am delighted that my two sons had the opportunity to visit the crafts corner and participate in various cultural activities and heritage programs.”

 


How Saudi Arabia’s new economic cities can make manufacturing more sustainable

How Saudi Arabia’s new economic cities can make manufacturing more sustainable
Updated 22 April 2024
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How Saudi Arabia’s new economic cities can make manufacturing more sustainable

How Saudi Arabia’s new economic cities can make manufacturing more sustainable
  • The Saudi Green Initiative aims to promote eco-friendly practices, such as reducing waste in manufacturing
  • On International Mother Earth Day, Saudi Arabia continues its effort to mitigate the effects of climate change

RIYADH: As the world marks International Mother Earth Day on April 22, Saudi Arabia continues its effort to mitigate the effects of climate change, accelerate its transition to green energy, promote sustainability, and protect natural habitats through the Saudi Green Initiative.

Launched in 2021, one key SGI target is to reduce carbon emissions by 278 million tonnes per annum by 2030 and to achieve net zero by 2060. The Kingdom hopes to reach this milestone through investments in renewable energy sources like wind and solar.

Three wind projects are under development in the Kingdom, while a fourth, Dumat Al-Jandal, is already the largest operational wind farm in the Middle East, with a 400-megawatt capacity.

Saudi Arabia also operates 13 solar photovoltaic projects. The Al-Henakiyah project is under development and will generate a capacity of 1,500 MW, ranking it among the world’s five largest solar farms.

FASTFACT

• International Mother Earth Day, celebrated every year on April 22, was recognized by the UN General Assembly in 2009 to raise awareness about the importance of protecting the environment.

Besides wind and solar, the Kingdom is also building a green hydrogen project in NEOM and a carbon capture project at the Aramco Research Center at the King Abdullah University for Science and Technology. 

The green hydrogen project will produce clean energy derived using renewables, while the carbon capture project focuses on capturing and storing carbon dioxide to help mitigate climate change.

Beyond the transition to green energy, SGI includes projects designed to combat desertification, preserve biodiversity, and promote eco-friendly practices, such as reducing waste in manufacturing.

The carbon capture project of Aramco Research Center at the King Abdullah University for Science and Technology focuses on capturing and storing carbon dioxide to help mitigate climate change. (KAUST photo)

Economic cities and special economic zones are viewed as one solution to the waste problems associated with commercial activity. In the Gulf Cooperation Council area, these are fast becoming a topic of interest for policymakers and businesses.

Saudi Arabia is taking proactive steps to build self-powering economic cities. Regulated by the Economic Cities and Special Zones Authority, the Kingdom aims to attract investment, promote economic growth, and create jobs. 

“That’s a real window of opportunity to identify the diversity of industries that can exist within economic cities and how they can benefit from these opportunities to collaborate, extend their networks, and find opportunities for local sourcing,” Rana Hajirasouli, founder of The Surpluss climate tech platform based in the UAE, told Arab News.

Opinion

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Hajirasouli says the annual waste and surplus created by manufacturers worldwide is valued at approximately $780 billion.

This vast sum represents a missed opportunity for companies to maximize their profits and reduce their environmental impact by reassessing waste management practices and adopting more sustainable strategies. 

“The problem is not just the waste we throw out and the emissions … it’s also unoccupied warehouse spaces, unoptimized logistics,” she said.

The Kingdom has launched four such economic cities: the King Abdullah Economic City in Rabigh, Jazan Economic City, Prince Abdulaziz bin Musaid Economic City in Hail, and Knowledge Economic City in Madinah.

King Abdullah Economic City in Rabigh. (KAEC photo)

Establishing these spaces is seen as a key strategy for Saudi Arabia to diversify its economy and reduce its dependence on oil revenues, while also promoting long-term environmental sustainability.

Collaboration between businesses cohabiting economic cities could be one way in which they can mitigate the harmful effects of their waste production through innovative solutions and circular economy principles.

“Instead of focusing on trading carbon, businesses essentially find ways to reduce their emissions through the circular economy and daily-basis operational changes,” said Hajirasouli. “Accounts of that are evident in sustainability reports.”

Such collaborations, known as industrial symbiosis, align with sustainable development and circular economy goals, emphasizing the importance of resource conservation, waste reduction, and environmental protection. 

They involve reusing waste and by-products generated by one particular industry or industrial process to serve as raw materials for another. 

By adopting these principles, businesses can transform their waste streams into valuable resources, thereby creating a more circular and sustainable production system, said Hajirasouli.

DID YOUKNOW?

• Dumat Al-Jandal in Saudi Arabia is the largest operational wind farm in the Middle East, with capacity to generate 400 megawatts of power.

• The total cost of waste and surplus generated by companies globally is estimated to be about $780 billion a year.

• The Jazan IGCC plant is the largest gasification facility of its kind in the world and can produce up to 3.8 gigawatts of power.

“One interesting example is in Denmark where various companies in a small 16-sq. km area use excess steam from the power plants that aren’t needed for electricity and that goes to other factories,” she said. 

This creates a closed-loop system where materials, energy, and resources are repurposed rather than wasted. 

Aramco’s fully integrated Jazan Refinery and Petrochemical Complex is setting the stage for similar industrial symbiosis in Saudi Arabia’s Jazan Economic City. 

The Jazan oil refinery, designed to have an output capacity of up to 400,000 barrels per day, is expected to provide raw materials for the integrated gasification combined-cycle plant, which generates power and industrial gases.

Aramco’s fully integrated Jazan Refinery and Petrochemical Complex is setting the stage for similar industrial symbiosis in Saudi Arabia’s Jazan Economic City. (Aramco photo)

In the process of refining crude oil, synthetic gas — or syngas — is produced, which is typically used as fuel for industry and shipping. 

The hot syngas stream produced by gasification must be cooled down before processing. However, thanks to industrial symbiosis, that heat will not be wasted.

The plan is to capture the refinery’s waste steam and use it to drive turbines to create electricity in the power generation plant. 

However, the steam is produced at extremely high temperatures — far higher than what is required to turn the turbines. This means the process could still result in a significant waste of energy. 

To prevent this, the Jazan refinery will absorb and use this heat in recovery units.

Adopting mitigation approaches and industrial symbiosis such as these in Saudi Arabia’s economic cities is seen as an ideal path to promoting sustainable practices.

By fostering collaboration and resource sharing among industries, these economic cities can not only enhance their environmental performance but also contribute to the overall sustainable development of the Kingdom.

 


Swifties in Saudi Arabia gather for listening party

Swifties in Saudi Arabia gather for listening party
Updated 21 April 2024
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Swifties in Saudi Arabia gather for listening party

Swifties in Saudi Arabia gather for listening party
  • Fans of the American pop icon are diving deep into ‘The Tortured Poets Department’ double album

ALKHOBAR: Overlooking the city of Alkhobar, with colorful neon lights shimmering in the night sky, Swifties of the Eastern Province came together to listen to Taylor Swift’s anticipated double album, “The Tortured Poets Department,” on the night of its release.

At the very same time the album started playing in Alkhobar’s Trip Lounge, Riyadh hosted its own listening party at Level Up and Jeddah’s Swifties tuned in from Makan.

It was a full house with almost every seat occupied in Trip Lounge. Musicians Zamzam and Naif Hashem, who hosted the event, engaged in dialogue with everyone in the room between songs. Only two of the attendees admitted to listening to the album before coming, but still expressed surprise with others when lyrics began to spill from the speakers.

Musicians Zamzam and Naif Hashem, who hosted the Taylor Swift listening party, engaged in dialogue with everyone in the room between songs from the new album. (AN photo)

Zamzam and Hashem, each of whom have demanding day jobs, separately release music. Zamzam, who often performs locally at places such as Bohemia, is the lead singer of the indie/folk band also called Zamzam, and Hashem, a dentist, just released a new song, “The Great Divide,” earlier this month.

Both hosts avoided listening to the album, which had been released earlier in the day, before hosting the Taylor Swift Nights experience. They self-identify as Swifties, as fans of the singer are known, and have combed through Swift’s discography with the attentiveness of a fellow musician.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Riyadh hosted its own listening party for Taylor Swift’s new album ‘The Tortured Poets Department’ at Level Up and Jeddah’s Swifties tuned in from Makan.

• The album’s title has been influenced by the cult classic 1989 film ‘Dead Poets Society.’

• Alkhobar Swifties’ unanimous favorite of the night seemed to be ‘Florida!!!’ which featured Florence & The Machine.

They were the ideal guides to fill the gaps between songs.

“We’re here to listen to Taylor’s new double album because there’s a community here that really likes to listen to things together. We’ve done this before and it was successful, and we’ve been planning this since the album was announced; it’s so much nicer of an experience to have people gasp, yell and cry with you,” Zamzam told Arab News.

Since its release on Friday, the album quickly climbed the charts and became the most streamed album in a single day in Spotify history. (AN photo)

Swift’s latest release is a chaotic but self-aware collection of 31 songs which all sound like signature Swift, while still offering a new sonic collage of stories made of playful, petty and witty narratives. In almost every song there was a lyric, or a few, which made fans groan or applaud in unison.

Since its release on Friday, the album quickly climbed the charts and became the most streamed album in a single day in Spotify history.

We’ve been planning this since the album was announced; it’s so much nicer of an experience to have people gasp, yell and cry with you.

Zamzam, Musician

Swift said in an Instagram post announcing the release: “This writer is of the firm belief that our tears become holy in the form of ink on a page. Once we have spoken our saddest story, we can be free of it … and then all that’s left behind is the tortured poetry.”

A songwriter since her teens, Swift has always offered a romantic notion to her work, bending across genres, starting with country and experimenting with various styles since. No matter what style she sings in, Swift’s fans consider her a modern poet who combines the soul of the tortured artist with a playful, never-want-to-grow-up Peter Pan millennial attitude.

Since its release on Friday, the album quickly climbed the charts and became the most streamed album in a single day in Spotify history. (AN photo)

Swift has made a habit of finding poetic ways to revive the voices and stories of people from the past, especially women, such as the “It Girl” of the the Roaring Twenties, Clara Bow, who one of the tracks on the album is named after.

Speculation on the subject of lyrics is a constant pastime for Swifties, who sift through puns and references in her lyrics in search of cryptic meanings. Swift rarely ever confirms who she writes about or why, so it is all open to interpretation.

The album’s title was rumored to have been influenced by the cult classic 1989 film “Dead Poets Society.” The music video for the song “Fortnight” with Post Malone featured cameos by the film’s beloved stars Ethan Hawke and Josh Charles.

“I think Taylor is finally coming into herself … this is my own interpretation of Taylor, but throughout the years, she really likes to reference classic literature and she’d really like to view herself as an American poet,” Zamzam said. “I read one of her speeches (where) she referenced Emily Dickinson as a huge inspiration for her … I think this was her just finally ripping off a band-aid she’s been wanting to rip off for a while, because she tried with ‘Evermore’ and ‘Folklore’ (previous albums) and was just like, ‘You know what? I'm leaning into it’.”

The listening party featured a calm ambience, dimmed lights and seats lined up as if in an intimate concert. Lyrics scrolled down, karaoke-style, on a big screen. Some in the crowd quickly took to the beat and sang along. Some swayed silently.

The crowd’s unanimous favorite of the night seemed to be “Florida!!!” which featured Florence & The Machine.

The double album, which Swift has said took her two years to write, appeared to have strong influences from her previous work.

Zamzam said that hosting the listening party in her hometown was important as it offered a dedicated space for Swifties, many of whom are from the millennial and gen Z generations. It offered Swifties a chance to come together to celebrate their favorite singer and openly discuss her lyrics.

“Hosting Taylor Swift Nights started in 2021 … I didn’t have anything on my mind, didn’t have any expectations or anything. It was just me and my best friend,” Hashem said of the first time they hosted the event several years ago in Jeddah.

“We didn’t have any expectation but we were blown away at how many people showed up! It was like 100 something. I was shocked. And then it was like ‘OK, there (are) die-hard Swifties here in Saudi Arabia.’ I thought I was the only one,” he added.

He connected with Zamzam and the collaborative effort to host an in-person event for Swifties in Alkhobar was born.

“We managed to find Trip Lounge and we hosted our first TS Nights back in August (last year). Having this community is very wholesome. Like Zamzam mentioned before, it’s having a community to experience happiness, grief and all of that. We are going to hand out tissues, just in case someone wants to cry,” he said.

“And we printed a bunch of papers; one paper so they can comment and rate each song, and one where they can write down their predictions for each track. If they got the prediction right, they can cross it out. It’s like bingo. We want to entertain them (attendees). We don’t want them to be bored,” he added.

Sixth grader Ghada Bajaber, the youngest Swiftie in the room, certainly was not bored. She sipped on lemonade in between scribbling fiercely into her Bingo sheet.

“I’m here with my mom — we always listen to Taylor Swift songs, me and my mom. It is what we do together and it’s special for us,” she told Arab News. “I have exams in two days but I still came. I didn’t study, I didn’t do my homework … I just came to memorize Taylor Swift lyrics — not the multiplication table,” Bajaber added.

 


Taif’s rose farms bloom into global fragrance production hub

The fragrant crops have elevated the mountainous Taif region into a global rose capital. (SPA)
The fragrant crops have elevated the mountainous Taif region into a global rose capital. (SPA)
Updated 22 April 2024
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Taif’s rose farms bloom into global fragrance production hub

The fragrant crops have elevated the mountainous Taif region into a global rose capital. (SPA)
  • Flowers ‘represent our region’s heritage and competitive advantage’

RIYADH: Taif’s mountainous and famed rose farms have become a major fragrance production hub, producing over 550 million flowers annually and driving an economic engine worth millions.

Spanning 270 hectares, some 910 rose farms nurture around 1.14 million bushes across areas like Al-Hada, Al-Shifa, Wadi Muharram, Al-Wahat, and Al-Wahit, the Saudi Press Agency reported.

The fragrant crops have elevated the mountainous Taif region into a global rose capital. (SPA)

From March through to April, a kaleidoscope of petals unfurls across terraced fields, supplying over 70 factories and laboratories dedicated to extracting and producing over 80 sought-after derivatives that enjoy widespread popularity in the SR64 million ($17 million) domestic market.

The fragrant crops have elevated the mountainous governorate into a global rose capital which has even set a Guinness World Record with a basket of 84,450 roses.

NUMBER

550m

Some 910 rose farms in Taif nurture around 1.14 million bushes, resulting in production of over 550 million flowers annually.

“These roses represent our region’s heritage and competitive advantage,” said Majid Al-Khalif, director general of the Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture’s branch in the Makkah region, underscoring the ministry’s dedication to showcasing the agricultural prowess of each region through festivals and events.

The fragrant crops have elevated the mountainous Taif region into a global rose capital. (SPA)

“These initiatives not only promote local products but also foster knowledge exchange among farmers.”

Al-Khalif acknowledges the pivotal role played by collaborative efforts with local authorities in ensuring the success of these events, particularly the Rose Festival, which draws significant tourist interest.

The fragrant crops have elevated the mountainous Taif region into a global rose capital. (SPA)

Visitors are treated to a firsthand experience of the rose distillation process, seminars, workshops, and other activities tailored to enthusiasts of Taif’s roses.

Hani bin Abdulrahman Al-Qadi, director of the Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture’s office in the Taif region, shed light on the significance of the Rose Festival, which features the participation of more than 60 farms and the families who run them, showcasing their products over five days of festivities.

The fragrant crops have elevated the mountainous Taif region into a global rose capital. (SPA)

Al-Qadi said that the Sustainable Agricultural Rural Development Program, also known as Reef, was a key initiative aimed at bolstering the rose farming sector. The program focuses on enhancing the productivity of vital agricultural crops, aiming for a balanced rural development strategy. It also seeks to diversify agricultural production across rural areas while ensuring optimal and sustainable use of natural agricultural and water resources.

A dedicated unit for Taif’s roses has been established within the ministry’s office in Taif. Additionally, the adoption of tissue culture propagation for seedlings and the formation of a cooperative association to advance Taif’s rose cultivation are part of Reef’s objectives.

The fragrant crops have elevated the mountainous Taif region into a global rose capital. (SPA)

The ministry is actively involved in guiding and educating rose farmers on modern techniques to increase their productivity, Al-Qadi explained. Last year, a select group of rose farmers was sent to Bulgaria under a joint cooperation effort between Saudi Arabia and Bulgaria.

This initiative, organized by the Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture, aimed at facilitating knowledge exchange, enhancing farmers’ skills, and promoting development in rose cultivation, distillation, and various applications in medicine and cosmetics.

The fragrant crops have elevated the mountainous Taif region into a global rose capital. (SPA)

The ministry’s office in Taif is actively engaged in providing crucial support services to local farmers, aimed at enhancing their productivity in rose farming. These services encompass agricultural guidance, initiatives to rehabilitate agricultural terraces, and rainwater harvesting schemes, tailored specifically to benefit Taif’s rose growers.

Farmers receive expert guidance on adopting best agricultural practices, with dedicated pest control teams responding promptly to requests for pesticide spraying to safeguard crops from potential threats.

The ministry also spearheads the construction of essential water infrastructure, including tanks and barriers, while also facilitating the establishment of irrigation networks to boost agricultural activities.

Emphasizing the importance of sustainable practices, the ministry encourages small-scale rose farmers to embrace and implement best agricultural methods, providing them with valuable insights into leveraging advanced technologies and optimizing rose production techniques, including essential oil extraction as part of a value chain development approach.

 


Saudi FM arrives in Luxembourg for EU-GCC forum on regional security, cooperation

Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan arrived in Luxembourg on Sunday. (File/AFP)
Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan arrived in Luxembourg on Sunday. (File/AFP)
Updated 22 April 2024
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Saudi FM arrives in Luxembourg for EU-GCC forum on regional security, cooperation

Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan arrived in Luxembourg on Sunday. (File/AFP)
  • Prince Faisal is due to discuss ways to enhance cooperation between GCC states and the EU in various fields

RIYADH: Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan arrived in Luxembourg on Sunday to participate in a high-level forum on regional security and cooperation between the Gulf Cooperation Council and the EU.

He will discuss with participants at the forum ways to enhance cooperation between the GCC and the EU in various fields, the importance of multilateral coordination, and regional and international developments, the Saudi Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

Prince Faisal will also hold bilateral meetings on the sidelines of the forum.

The EU-GCC High Level Forum on Regional Security and Cooperation will be held on Monday.

“The forum will gather EU foreign ministers and their counterparts from the GCC member states, and the EU special representative for the Gulf region,” the EU’s diplomatic service said.


First Hima forum discusses wildlife conservation in Saudi Arabia

First Hima forum discusses wildlife conservation in Saudi Arabia
Updated 21 April 2024
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First Hima forum discusses wildlife conservation in Saudi Arabia

First Hima forum discusses wildlife conservation in Saudi Arabia
  • One of the center’s projects is an expedition to examine and study Saudi Arabia’s wildlife and landscapes across all regions, in collaboration with universities and educational centers in each area, Qurban told Arab News

RIYADH: The National Center for Wildlife organized the first Hima protected areas forum on Sunday to discuss conservation efforts for natural habitats and wildlife in Saudi Arabia.

The forum was inaugurated by the minister of environment, water, and agriculture and chairman of the board of the National Center for Wildlife, Abdulrahman Al-Fadhli.

The event, held from April 21-24, is the first of its kind in the region and attracts both local and international participants.

Red Sea Global, Catmosphere, the Royal Commission for AlUla, and the Imam Abdulaziz bin Mohammed Royal Reserve Development Authority are among the companies and projects participating in the three-day forum. (AN photo by Abdulrahman Alnajim)

“We are talking about participation from Red Sea Global, AMAALA, and NEOM to work together and deliver conservation efforts,” said Mohammad Qurban, CEO of the National Center for Wildlife.

Qurban added that hosting Hima will bring knowledge, effort, and expertise together to preserve and protect natural resources.

In addition, the center will highlight some of the Kingdom’s sustainable practices related to environmental health, he added.

One of the center’s projects is an expedition to examine and study Saudi Arabia’s wildlife and landscapes across all regions, in collaboration with universities and educational centers in each area, Qurban told Arab News.

Institutions including the UK’s University of Oxford and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology will take part in the program.

Major local companies and projects are attending the three-day forum, including Red Sea Global, Catmosphere, the Royal Commission for AlUla and the Imam Abdulaziz bin Mohammed Royal Reserve Development Authority.

Omar Al-Attas, head of environmental protection and regeneration at Red Sea Global, said: “Red Sea Global, since the beginning of its development, kept the protection, enhancement and preservation of the environment as the main target. We have been working through the years to understand exactly what we are dealing with from both sides, terrestrial and marine.

“Based on a long time, which exceeded three years of assessment and establishing a baseline, we understand clearly our marine area, which led to the design of the marine protected area, a proposal that we will be working on with the National Center for Wildlife and the ministry.”

The forum offers a comprehensive program for visitors, featuring activities including panel discussions, presentations and workshops. All sessions are conducted by local and international experts focused on conserving nature and protecting biodiversity.

“In King Khalid Reserve, which we are also responsible for, we introduced the oryx. We started introducing it in the year 2021,” said Talal Al-Harigi, CEO of the Imam Abdulaziz bin Mohammed Royal Reserve Development Authority.

“On the other side, we are increasing the number of plants. One month ago, we completed planting 1 million plants for both of the reserves.

“We are working with local communities to support handicrafts relating to honey bees. Bee grazing is now one of our new activities … for the second year, honey bees are producing Rudhat Khuraim honey,” Al-Harigi added.

Since its founding in 2019, the National Center for Wildlife has addressed challenges facing wildlife and marine ecosystems, aiming to protect the environment for future generations.