From content creator to CEO, Ahmed Aljar speaks on success at Athar Festival

Special From content creator to CEO, Ahmed Aljar speaks on success at Athar Festival
1 / 4
Ahmed Aljar speaks with Karl Mapstone at Athar. (AN Photo/Abdulrhman Bin Shalhoub)
Special From content creator to CEO, Ahmed Aljar speaks on success at Athar Festival
2 / 4
Ahmed Aljar speaks with Karl Mapstone at Athar. (AN Photo/Abdulrhman Bin Shalhoub)
Special From content creator to CEO, Ahmed Aljar speaks on success at Athar Festival
3 / 4
Ahmed Aljar speaks with Karl Mapstone at Athar. (AN Photo/Abdulrhman Bin Shalhoub)
Special From content creator to CEO, Ahmed Aljar speaks on success at Athar Festival
4 / 4
Ahmed Aljar speaks with Karl Mapstone at Athar. (AN Photo/Abdulrhman Bin Shalhoub)
Short Url
Updated 15 November 2023
Follow

From content creator to CEO, Ahmed Aljar speaks on success at Athar Festival

From content creator to CEO, Ahmed Aljar speaks on success at Athar Festival
  • Ahmed Aljar: If you’re authentic and real and you present something special and creative, you will have a great chance
  • Athar festival, running until Nov. 16, unites Saudi Arabia’s creative and marketing sectors for recognition and celebration

RIYADH: Saudi content creator Ahmed Aljar said that patience and consistency have been key factors in his journey from being a YouTuber to becoming the CEO of his media agency, Vito.

He shared insights into his success during a fireside chat titled “Influencers in Saudi Arabia, Best Practices for Brands” at the Saudi Festival of Creativity, Athar, in Riyadh on Tuesday.

The session was moderated by Karl Mapstone, the head of Vamp Middle East marketing agency.

The panel discussion highlighted various strategies for influencers to achieve success, using the story of Aljar, who went from being an engineering graduate to a successful content creator.

Aljar said: “In my third year of college, it just hit me that I don’t think in an engineering way, and it was too late for me to switch majors. I graduated, and during that period, I started my YouTube channel because it was always in the back of my head. I knew that I wanted to document my life and my experience in the US.”

Continuing his YouTube career and relocating to Saudi Arabia, Aljar witnessed a peak in engagement like never before. He mentioned that sharing content about travels and family attracted a large audience that soon became a loyal following.

Aljar said: “The people who use the platforms are just supportive. They like to see good content. They appreciate influencers. If you’re authentic and real and you present something special and creative, you will have a great chance.”

After amassing 2.2 million subscribers and producing 620 videos, Aljar decided to leave YouTube a year and a half ago to focus on other social media platforms, including TikTok and Instagram.

Today, he is CEO of Vito and is thriving with almost 1 million followers on TikTok and over 300,000 on Instagram.

Aljar’s success stems from paying attention to detail and ensuring his expectations are met.

He said: “We check the videos after the campaign, considering how we can step up in other collaborations. So, I take it very seriously. We have our own way of creating content.

“I know how to talk to my audience, and we are very detailed in creating content. You know, the lenses, the small details … we study the room before we get in.”

He added: “I started as a content creator all the way to the CEO of a creative agency, Vito. So, patience, patience, patience, and consistency. I spent a year without making any money in this field, without reaching a thousand subscribers. But, you know, I was just charged up. I wanted to create and put myself on the social media map.”

Through owning a business, AlJar said he has learned how to be a content creator while “building relationships, networking, and enhancing communication.”

He advised the young Saudi community to “be creative, learn how to delegate, hire people, invest in equipment and a team to help build your ideas and storyboards, present yourself in the best way possible, and be genuine about it on a business level.”

The Athar festival, running until Nov. 16, unites Saudi Arabia’s creative and marketing sectors for recognition and celebration. It features workshops, coaching, training, roundtables, C-suite sessions, young talent competitions, and an awards ceremony.


Lebanon minister threatens to sue The Telegraph over ‘ridiculous’ airport weapons-storage claims

Lebanon minister threatens to sue The Telegraph over ‘ridiculous’ airport weapons-storage claims
Updated 56 sec ago
Follow

Lebanon minister threatens to sue The Telegraph over ‘ridiculous’ airport weapons-storage claims

Lebanon minister threatens to sue The Telegraph over ‘ridiculous’ airport weapons-storage claims
  • Hezbollah storing Iran-made weapons at Beirut airport, says report
  • Ali Hamieh invited media and officials to inspect the site on Monday

LONDON: Lebanon’s Public Works and Transport Minister Ali Hamieh has threatened to sue The Telegraph for reporting claims that Hezbollah was using Beirut-Rafic Hariri Airport to smuggle weapons into the country.

At a press conference in Beirut on Sunday, Hamieh, the caretaker minister affiliated with Hezbollah, denied the allegations and described them as “ridiculous.”

He called for an “open to all” inspection of the site on Monday and announced plans to sue The Telegraph for defamation.

“The airport has been always a target of the Israeli enemy, and everything written in The Telegraph is untrue; no weapons are entering or leaving through the airport,” Hamieh said.

He said Lebanon’s customs officials “represent the state in protecting Beirut airport, and their integrity cannot be questioned,” and that they have “nothing to hide.”

The Telegraph published the report on Sunday alleging that Hezbollah was storing huge quantities of Iran-sourced weapons, missiles and explosives at Beirut-Rafic Hariri Airport.

The cache allegedly includes Iran-made Falaq unguided artillery rockets, Fateh-110 short-range missiles, road-mobile ballistic missiles, M-600 missiles that can reach up to 321 km, and other precision-guided weapons.

It also mentioned quantities of RDX, an explosive known as cyclonite or hexogen.

The British outlet cited an “anonymous airport worker” as the sole source of the claims.

Hamieh claimed The Telegraph had not consulted the British Department of Transport, which conducted a field visit of the airport in January.

He added that The Telegraph had initially claimed its source was an official from the International Air Transport Association, but later changed it to an unnamed worker.

“Is it conceivable that a reputable newspaper would change its sources within an hour?” Hamieh asked.

The Air Transport Union in Lebanon has denied the claims, stating that they were “mere illusions and lies aimed at endangering Beirut Airport and its civilian workers, as well as travelers to and from it, all of whom are civilians.”

The report was met with skepticism by some social media users, who slammed the British daily’s allegations as propaganda aimed at destabilizing the country.


Apple holds talks with rival Meta over AI: report

Apple holds talks with rival Meta over AI: report
Updated 24 June 2024
Follow

Apple holds talks with rival Meta over AI: report

Apple holds talks with rival Meta over AI: report
  • Pressure has been on Apple to persuade doubters on its AI strategy, after Microsoft and Google rolled out products in rapid-fire succession.

WASHINGTON: Apple is talking to major rival Meta about integrating the Facebook parent company’s generative AI into its products, as it tries to catch up with rivals on artificial intelligence, the Wall Street Journal reported Sunday.
The report comes after Apple also struck a deal with OpenAI, the creator of ChatGPT, to help equip its Apple Intelligence suite of new AI features for its coveted products.
For months, pressure has been on Apple to persuade doubters on its AI strategy, after Microsoft and Google rolled out products in rapid-fire succession.
It has developed its own, smaller artificial intelligence but said that it will turn to others such as OpenAI to boost its in-house offering.
According to the Journal, which cited sources close to the matter, Meta has held discussions with Apple over integrating its own generative AI model into Apple Intelligence.
Apple senior vice president of software engineering Craig Federighi said in early June that Apple also wanted to integrate capabilities from Google’s generative AI system, Gemini, into its devices.

The iPhone maker is also expected to discuss partnerships with other AI companies in different regions like China, where Microsoft-backed OpenAI chatbot ChatGPT is banned.
AI startup Anthropic has been in discussions with Apple to bring its generative AI to Apple Intelligence, the Journal reported, citing people familiar with the matter.
Meta and Anthropic declined to comment, while Apple did not respond immediately to request for comment outside business hours.

AI search startup Perplexity has also been in discussions with Apple about bringing its generative AI technology to Apple Intelligence, a source familiar with the matter told Reuters.

The big challenge for Apple has been how to infuse ChatGPT-style AI — which voraciously feeds off data — into its products without weakening its heavily promoted user privacy and security, according to analysts.
Apple Intelligence will enable users to create their own emojis based on a description in everyday language, or to generate brief summaries of emails in the mailbox.
Apple said Siri, its voice assistant, will also get an AI-infused upgrade and now will appear as a pulsating light on the edge of your home screen.
Launched over 12 years ago, Siri has long since been seen as a dated feature, overtaken by the new generation of assistants, such as GPT-4o, OpenAI’s latest offering.
According to Canalys, 16 percent of smartphones shipped this year will be equipped with generative AI features, a proportion it expects to rise to 54 percent by 2028.

The discussions have not been finalized and could fall through, WSJ reported, adding that deals with Apple would help AI companies to obtain a wider distribution of their products.
The size of potential financial windfall is unclear, but the talks involved AI companies selling premium subscriptions to their services through Apple Intelligence, the report said.
 


Reuters denies reporting imminent Israeli attack on Lebanon following social media claims

Reuters denies reporting imminent Israeli attack on Lebanon following social media claims
Updated 23 June 2024
Follow

Reuters denies reporting imminent Israeli attack on Lebanon following social media claims

Reuters denies reporting imminent Israeli attack on Lebanon following social media claims

LONDON: Reuters denied on Saturday that it had reported that Israel would attack Lebanon within 48 hours, after reports circulated on social media citing the news agency as saying this.
“Any claims that Reuters reported that Israel will attack Lebanon within the next 48 hours are false. Reuters did not report this,” a Reuters spokesperson said.


Women’s journalism group rescinds courage award given to Palestinian reporter in Gaza

Women’s journalism group rescinds courage award given to Palestinian reporter in Gaza
Updated 21 June 2024
Follow

Women’s journalism group rescinds courage award given to Palestinian reporter in Gaza

Women’s journalism group rescinds courage award given to Palestinian reporter in Gaza
  • Maha Hussaini accuses International Women’s Media Foundation of bowing to pressure she says is typical of the systematic attacks Palestinian journalists face
  • Foundation’s decision follows a report by a conservative publication that accused Hussaini of support for Hamas and antisemitic comments

LONDON: A group that represents women in journalism has rescinded a Courage in Journalism award it presented this month to Palestinian journalist Maha Hussaini.

The decision by the International Women’s Media Foundation follows a report this week by the Washington Free Beacon, a conservative publication in the US, that alleged the freelance writer, who is based in Gaza, had posted messages on social media several years ago in which she praised terrorist actions by Hamas on at least two occasions and shared antisemitic cartoons.

The foundation said the comments in the posts “contradict the values of our organization,” adding: “Both the Courage Awards and the IWMF’s mission are based on integrity and opposition to intolerance. We do not, and will not, condone or support views or statements that do not adhere to those principles.”

Hussaini was named on June 10 as one of four recipients of the Courage Award, for her reporting during the war in Gaza. Her work included a story about the challenges women face giving birth at home during the conflict, and a harrowing account of a young girl who carried her paralyzed brother to safety during military bombing campaigns.

The IWMF describes itself as “a bold and inclusive organization that supports journalists where they are.” Its board and advisory council include prominent media figures such as former CNN journalist Suzanne Malveaux, the Washington Post’s Hannah Allam and CNN TV news anchor Christiane Amanpour.

Hussaini denounced the decision to rescind the award, accusing the Washington-based foundation of “succumbing to pressure” and “choosing to act contrary to courage.” She added that it “starkly demonstrated the systematic physical and moral attacks Palestinian journalists endure throughout their careers.”

Ina message posted on social media platform X, she added: “Each announcement of an award to a Palestinian journalist is systematically followed by extensive smearing campaigns and intense pressure on the awarding organizations from supporters of the Israeli occupation and the Zionist lobby.

“While some organizations uphold their principles and maintain their decision … others, regrettably, cave to the pressure and withdraw the prizes.”

Hussaini said she had “no regrets about any posts” and said her social media comments reflected her experiences of living under Israeli occupation and simply expressed support for resistance efforts.

The foundation’s decision was widely criticized by journalists and media groups. Some suggested Hussaini was the victim of a “vicious campaign,” others described the output of the Washington Free Beacon as “decadent and unethical” and said it had a history of targeting supporters of the Palestinian cause.


UK journalist Winnett will not join Washington Post as editor following backlash with staff

UK journalist Winnett will not join Washington Post as editor following backlash with staff
Updated 21 June 2024
Follow

UK journalist Winnett will not join Washington Post as editor following backlash with staff

UK journalist Winnett will not join Washington Post as editor following backlash with staff
  • Robert Winnett is accused of using unethical methods to obtain information
  • Winnet’s candidacy faced criticism from Post staff who scrutinized his past

WASHINGTON: British journalist Robert Winnett will not be joining the Washington Post as its editor, an internal memo seen by Reuters showed, following media reports that he used unethical methods to obtain information while working with the Sunday Times.
Post publisher Will Lewis had named Winnett, a former colleague who serves as deputy editor of the Daily Telegraph, to the role earlier this month after the exit of Sally Buzbee, the first woman to lead the storied newsroom. The reversal means Winnett will remain at the Daily Telegraph, which he joined in 2007.
“It is with regret that I share with you that Robert Winnett has withdrawn from the position of Editor at The Washington Post,” Lewis said in the memo on Friday.
The New York Times reported last Saturday that Lewis and Winnett used fraudulently obtained records in articles at London’s Sunday Times newspaper. On Sunday, the Post published a report detailing Winnett’s ties to John Ford, who has admitted to using illegal methods to gain information for stories.
Lewis did not immediately respond to Reuters requests for comment, while Winnett declined to comment.
Daily Telegraph editor Chris Evans said in an internal memo, “I’m pleased to report that Rob Winnett has decided to stay with us. As you all know, he’s a talented chap and their loss is our gain.”
The Post’s memo showed that it has started a search for a new editor and that Matt Murray, former editor-in-chief of the Wall Street Journal, will lead the newsroom and continue in his role as executive editor until after the US elections.
The newspaper, owned by Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos, is one of many news outlets struggling to maintain a sustainable business model in the decades since the Internet upended the economics of journalism and digital advertising rates plummeted.
Executives at the Post last year offered voluntary buyouts across the company to reduce employee headcount by about 10 percent and shrink the size of the newsroom to about 940 journalists.
A report in the Post last month said the newspaper was planning to create new subscription tiers called Post Pro and Post Plus to draw more money from its readers after losing $77 million over the past year.