The year ahead: The top TV shows of 2024

The year ahead: The top TV shows of 2024
Season two of ‘House of the Dragon’ airs in the summer. (Supplied)
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Updated 23 January 2024
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The year ahead: The top TV shows of 2024

The year ahead: The top TV shows of 2024
  • From grand finales to spectacular spinoffs, it looks like being another great year for television

‘House of the Dragon’

 

 

Starring: Matt Smith, Olivia Cooke, Emma D’Arcy

The first season of HBO’s “Game of Thrones” prequel may not have received quite as rapturous a reception — nor garnered as many column inches — as its illustrious predecessor, but then again few shows ever have. What it did do was deliver a beautifully filmed, convincingly acted mix of political intrigue, gory action, swords, sorcery and skin (and dragons, obviously) that was both engrossing and entertaining. Following George R.R. Martin’s book that is set a few centuries before “GoT,” “House of the Dragon” is the story of the ruling Targaryen family and the fight for control of it (and, therefore, of Westeros). Expect further labyrinthine plotting, horrible deaths, and stylishly delivered euphemisms in season two when it airs in the summer on OSN+.

‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’

Starring: Larry David, Jeff Garlin, Cheryl Hines, Susie Essman

The upcoming 12th season of Larry David’s often-toe-curling sitcom based on a fictional version of himself — due out Feb. 4 — will reportedly be the last, at least according to David (although we’ve heard that before, several times). It’s hard to imagine quite how he can top any of his previous storylines, both in terms of laughs earned and boundaries crossed, but it was equally hard to imagine how anyone could turn this narcissistic, egomaniacal, crass, cowardly character into someone that audiences would root for and keep coming back to watch. David managed to do the latter, so you’d be foolish to bet against the former.

‘True Detective: Night Country’

 

 

Starring: Jodie Foster, Kali Reis, John Hawkes, Christopher Ecclestone

The first season of the anthology series “True Detective” — the one with Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey as the leads — remains one of the finest crime shows of all time. Seasons two and three didn’t reach those same dizzy heights, unfortunately, but there’s plenty of justifiable excitement around season four, which begins this week on OSN+ in the region. “Night Country” stars two-time Oscar-winner Jodie Foster as detective Liz Danvers, investigating the simultaneous disappearance of eight scientists living at the Tsalal Arctic Research Station in the small town of Ennis, Alaska. It’s set during the winter period when the sun never rises, hence the title.

‘The Walking Dead: The Ones Who Live’

 

 

Starring: Andrew Lincoln, Danai Gurira, Pollyanna McIntosh

There was a time — although it seems very long ago now — when “The Walking Dead” was a must-see show. Yes, the post-apocalyptic zombie show went out with a whimper, and yes, the several spinoff series have done little to reward fans’ interest, but... there’s still a glimmer of hope, perhaps, that “The Ones Who Live” can reclaim the glory days. For a start, it stars Andrew Lincoln as Rick Grimes — the focal point of those glory days — and Danai Gurira as sword-wieldig badass Michonne, always a fan favorite. Gurira is also a co-creator of the show, along with Scott M. Gimple, who joined the original in its second season.

‘3 Body Problem’

 

 

Starring: Saamer Usmani, Jess Hong, Rosalind Chao, Benedict Wong

The latest series from the co-creators of HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, is also an adaptation of an acclaimed novel; this one an award-winning sci-fi epic by Chinese author Liu Cixin. Astrophysicist Ye Wenjie sees her father brutally murdered during the Chinese Cultural Revolution and is herself branded a traitor. She is later conscripted to the military and sent to a secret radar base to help with a scientific research program. One day, she takes a huge risk, and tells no one about it. Decades later, the ramifications of her decision become clear, and a group of modern-day scientists must face mankind’s greatest threat.

‘Masters of the Air’

 

 

Starring: Austin Butler, Callum Turner, Anthony Boyle, Nate Mann

Executive producers Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks finally complete their trilogy of miniseries based on the events of World War II (from an American point of view). Having focused on the army in 2001’s “Band of Brothers” and the marines in 2010’s “The Pacific,” they turn their attention to the air force this time, specifically the Eighth Air Force, which was engaged in some of the war’s most-dangerous missions in Northern Europe. Acclaimed filmmaker Cary Fukunaga (“No Time To Die,” “True Detective”) helms the show — based on Donald L. Miller’s book — in which Hollywood hot property Austin Butler plays Major Gale Cleven, one of the leaders of the Eighth’s 100th Bombardment Group.

‘The Regime’

 

 

Starring: Kate Winslet, Martha Plimpton, Hugh Grant

In the satrical miniseries “The Regime,” due out March 3, Kate Winslet plays the head of a fictional Central European autocracy — one which domestic turmoil is threatening to bring down — turmoil that is only further stoked when the leader of the oppostion (Hugh Grant) is thrown in prison. Showrunner Will Tracy has some serious pedigree when it comes to black comedy and satire, having written for both “Succession” and “Last Week Tonight With John Oliver.” And the last time Winslet headed an HBO show, we got the magnificent “Mare of Easttown,” so hopes are high for this one.

‘Mo’

Starring: Mo Amer, Teresa Ruiz, Farah Bsieso

The first series of Mo Amer’s comedy drama was a triumph — rising above inevitable comparisons to “Ramy” (in which Amer stars, and whose creator, Ramy Youssef, also helped create “Mo”) to offer an insightful and very funny take on themes including the Palestinian experience, religion, race, love, identity, and duty versus desire. Amer plays Mo Najjar, a flawed but ultimately lovable refugee hustler living in Houston, Texas, where Amer himself grew up. Season two is scheduled to shoot March through May, so we’re hoping it will be out before the end of the year.


Sound of Ruby: ‘The spread of culture is a very beautiful thing’ 

Sound of Ruby: ‘The spread of culture is a very beautiful thing’ 
Updated 18 July 2024
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Sound of Ruby: ‘The spread of culture is a very beautiful thing’ 

Sound of Ruby: ‘The spread of culture is a very beautiful thing’ 
  • The Saudi alt-rock veterans are enjoying the rewards of more than two decades of work 

DAMMAM: Dammam-based alternative rock band Sound of Ruby have been telling stories through music for decades.  

“We can say that we were the first band to play rock in Dammam, or Saudi Arabia,” frontman Muhammad “The Camel” Al-Hajjaj, who founded the group in 1996, tells Arab News.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by soundofruby (@soundofruby)

Al-Hajjaj describes the band’s sound as “punk rock, alternative rock, emphasizing Saudi and Arab music,” and cites Henry Rollins — founder of US hardcore band Black Flag — and grunge legends Nirvana as influences, along with two of Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain’s major inspirations, Pixies and Melvins.  

But back in Nineties Dammam, there were few who shared Al-Hajjaj’s love of loud Western-style rock music. “If we saw someone wearing a rock band T-shirt, we’d immediately try to talk to him,” Al-Hajjaj says. “It was hard. The popular music (in the community) at the time was rap, Bob Marley, Michael Jackson, and Arabic (mainstream) music. I like Michael Jackson, by the way. But it was hard. We’d hear ‘What is this?’ from people.” 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by soundofruby (@soundofruby)

Al-Hajjaj, like many rock musicians, taught himself to play guitar. He was inspired to do so, he says, by a scene in 1985’s “Back to the Future” when Michael J. Fox’s character plays the famous riff from Chuck Berry’s “Johnny B. Goode” (also covered by several other guitar greats, including Jimi Hendrix). “It made me love the instrument,” he explains. “My father said, ‘Be good and I’ll buy you a guitar, don’t worry.’ It was the era of MTV and Channel V, there was a love for the guitar.” 

At that time, he stresses, there was no internet on which to view tutorial videos. So Al-Hajjaj bought a 20-page book (“I still have it today”) which showed the finger patterns for chords and began to learn a few songs. “Everything was do-it-yourself,” he says. “We’d get together at weekends and play small underground gigs.” More than 12,000 kilometers away from where Rollins and the Melvins were based, Al-Hajjaj was mirroring their punk DIY ethic.   

“They had vicious names for those of us who listened to that music,” he says. “But, with time, there was acceptance.” 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by soundofruby (@soundofruby)

Sound of Ruby played a major part in gaining that acceptance. And they did so at a time when there was no infrastructure in place to support anyone interested in creating music in the Kingdom that was not Khaleeji pop. That, in itself, is remarkable enough. The fact that, almost 30 years on, they’re still going (albeit with some lineup changes over the years — the current roster is Al-Hajjaj along with bassist Kamal Khalil, lead guitarist Nader Al-Fassam, who’ve both been part of the group for a couple of decades, and drummer Faris Alshawaf, who only recently took over from his brother, Talal) and still retaining their alt-rock roots as they move through middle age is even more astonishing. 

It helps significantly that Khalil also owns a recording studio. “We’re lucky to have a sound engineer who’s been a member of the band for 24 years,” Al-Hajjaj says. That enabled Sound of Ruby to put out professional-level recordings (10 albums so far, plus singles) even when there were few studios geared up to capture rock music in the Kingdom.  

It’s been a long road, Al-Fassam acknowledges.  

“When I joined the band, my son was 10 days old; today, he’s 20,” he says, adding that his son is now a musician himself, performing in several bands around Dhahran.  

“We’re proud that we’ve influenced the younger generation throughout our artistic career, providing them with support and encouragement,” Al-Hajjaj says.  

Sound of Ruby members Kamal Khalil, Muhammad Al-Hajjaj and Nader Al-Fassam. (Supplied)

Many in the younger generation got a taste of Sound of Ruby in one of Saudi Arabia’s most successful movies, 2022’s wrestling-themed action-comedy “Sattar” — which is now also available on Netflix — thanks to Al-Hajjaj’s younger brother Ibrahim, an actor and comedian.  

“An opportunity came when a rock song was requested for ‘Sattar.’ Our song ‘Fannan’ was very suitable for the scene,” he said.  

In ‘Sattar,’ Ibrahim plays Saad, a soft-spoken daydreamer who longs to be a wrestler—an ambition that seems far out of reach. In the scene, he is driving in the car with his loving fiancée by his side and his demanding future mother-in-law in the backseat. When they ask him to play some music during the already awkward ride, “Fannan” blasts from the speakers. 

At first, Saad, the character, nervously fiddles with the radio dials, clearly worried they might misunderstand his musical tastes. But quickly, his voice clears and he cheerfully proclaims: “This is a Saudi band, Sound of Ruby — I like to listen to different sounds and be cultured.”  

The women look baffled and reply, “You have strange taste.” 

Throughout the movie, Saad has to constantly overcome potentially crushing obstacles — both personally and professionally. The audience never stops rooting for him. This is a relatable Saudi struggle to balance childhood dreams with adult pressures, aiming to make society and family proud; Saad’s journey begins in the underground, outside of the mainstream, fueled by passion and perseverance. It’s easy to see why Sound of Ruby were chosen to help soundtrack his anger and frustration. 

But the band’s perseverance has paid off. The music industry is starting to catch up with their ambitions. The Kingdom’s cultural scene has been forever altered by the sweeping changes of the last six years. And Sound of Ruby’s live performances are no longer secret, underground affairs. You can often catch them live at the café-cum-record store Bohemia in Alkhobar.  

“The spread of culture is a very beautiful thing — whether it be music, acting, or any artistic work,” says Al-Hajjaj. “It’s a beautiful thing that we now play in our beautiful city. I used to dream of a place like Bohemia before — previously, concerts and audience participation were all outside the kingdom. Now, with the support of the Entertainment Authority, we are breathing life into the music.” 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by soundofruby (@soundofruby)

And Sound of Ruby are making full use of this new freedom.  

“We released three new songs from our new album, that will be released this year,” Al-Hajjaj says. “Stay tuned for the album and concerts. In 2026, the band will celebrate its 30th anniversary.” 

Like the precious gemstone they’re named after, known for its resiliency, Sound of Ruby are standing the test of time. 


Princess Rajwa shows off growing bump during outing with Prince Hussein

Princess Rajwa shows off growing bump during outing with Prince Hussein
Updated 18 July 2024
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Princess Rajwa shows off growing bump during outing with Prince Hussein

Princess Rajwa shows off growing bump during outing with Prince Hussein
  • Royal couple visit firm creating content on social issues
  • Prince lauds company’s focus on mental health concerns

DUBAI: Princess Rajwa of Jordan once again showcased her impeccable maternity style this week alongside Crown Prince Hussein bin Abdullah during their visit to Digitales Media, a local company that creates content on social issues.

The princess, who is from Saudi Arabia, wore Max Mara’s Drina silk-and-linen dress in a warm, brown color. It featured a high waistline that accommodated her maternity figure, with a softly pleated skirt of mid-calf length.

The dress had long sleeves with subtle cuff detailing and a gently gathered neckline.

The princess paired her outfit with a pink Fendi leather purse and matching pink satin ballet flats from Miu Miu.  

“Rajwa and I were delighted to visit Digitales today ... A Jordanian company creating impactful content on social issues and mental health,” the prince wrote on his Instagram, with pictures from the visit.

The royal couple, who announced the pregnancy in April, are expecting their first child this summer.

Since then, Princess Rajwa has been turning heads with her maternity style.

In May, she was spotted shopping in Amman wearing a blue denim jumpsuit from the Tencel Denim Maternity range by British label Seraphine.

She completed her look with white sneakers and accessorized with a Bottega Veneta Mini Cabat leather tote bag.

In her first maternity pictures, which were released on June 1, she donned a Vernia red blouson sleeve pleated maxi dress by Alice + Olivia, a contemporary clothing brand based in New York City.

The flowy, summery dress was cinched at the waist, accentuating her growing bump, and featured a V-shaped neckline.

On June 10, she attended King Abdullah’s silver jubilee celebrations in Amman, in a bespoke gown by Saudi Arabia designer Honayda Serafi.

This was just over a year after she wore an all-white look by the same designer for her pre-wedding henna celebrations.


Ramy Youssef nabs Emmy nomination for directing ‘The Bear’ episode

Ramy Youssef nabs Emmy nomination for directing ‘The Bear’ episode
Updated 18 July 2024
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Ramy Youssef nabs Emmy nomination for directing ‘The Bear’ episode

Ramy Youssef nabs Emmy nomination for directing ‘The Bear’ episode

DUBAI: US Egyptian comedian, writer and actor Ramy Youusef has nabbed himself a Primetime Emmy Awards nomination for Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series.

Youssef earned the nomination for directing “The Bear” episode titled “Honeydew” from its second season.

The fan-loved episode focused on the character Marcus, the lovable pastry chef portrayed by actor Lionel Boyce.

This is the third Emmy nomination for Youssef and his second for directing, after earning a 2020 nomination for directing an episode of his eponymous series “Ramy.” 

For this year’s Emmys, Youssef competes against “The Bear” series creator Christopher Storer for the episode “Fishes,” Guy Ritchie for “The Gentlemen,” Lucia Aniello for “Hacks,” Randall Einhorn for “Abbott Elementary,” and Mary Lou Belli for “The Ms Pat Show.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by The Bear (@thebearfx)

Overall, “Shogun” led the nominations with 25 nods, including limited series, and earned first-time acting nods for Hiroyuki Sanada and Anna Sawai.

Additionally, the FX network garnered a total of 93 nominations, bolstered by a record-breaking 23 nods for “The Bear.”


Ahmed Mater: The Saudi artist documenting a kingdom in flux

Ahmed Mater: The Saudi artist documenting a kingdom in flux
Updated 11 min 15 sec ago
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Ahmed Mater: The Saudi artist documenting a kingdom in flux

Ahmed Mater: The Saudi artist documenting a kingdom in flux
  • Christie’s London is hosting ‘Ahmed Mater: Chronicles,’ a retrospective collection of his work, until Aug. 22
  • The exhibition highlights major milestones of the physician-turned-artist’s career

LONDON: Using metal filings, X-rays adorned with calligraphy, and a grandiose mihrab transformed into a body scanner, leading Saudi artist Ahmed Mater is documenting a kingdom undergoing a swift process of change.

Born in Tabuk in 1979, Mater grew up in Abha in southwestern Saudi Arabia, close to the militarized Yemeni border, at a time of immense social change in the region.

The first presentation of his art outside the Kingdom came in 2005 at an exhibition hosted by the British Museum in London. Just over a decade later, he became the first artist to host a solo exhibition in the US, with “Symbolic Cities: The Work of Ahmed Mater” in 2016.

Now, the 44-year-old has returned to England with the exhibition “Ahmed Mater: Chronicles,” hosted by Christie’s London until Aug. 22. The mid-career retrospective collection features more than 100 of his works, and promises to highlight the major milestones of his career.

Ahmed Mater at the opening of ‘Chronicles.’ (AN photo)

“It’s very amazing and extraordinary for me to be back and connect again with the audience here in London after 2005, and now, maybe, with more artwork to share and 20 years of experimental work,” Mater told Arab News on the exhibition’s opening day.

“So, it’s something that, really, I want the audience to share all of this — the experiment and the time and sharing all of this journey together.”

Despite being heavily influenced by his mother’s work as an Asiri calligrapher and painter, and art being the “passion and DNA” of his childhood, Mater began his professional life working in medicine.

Mater first encountered city life as a teenager in Abha. (AN photo) 

“At that time, there was no … you have to do something, especially in Saudi Arabia, there was no school of art,” he said.

“So, medicine was very close to me. I studied a more human science; that’s very close to me.”

Despite “building a lot of things and experiences” during his work as a physician, Mater returned to his roots in art “because it became the only voice that I could continue with.”

The artist began experimenting with X-rays during his medical studies. (AN photo)

The physician-turned-artist described the difference between his two careers as one of “subjectivity versus objectivity.”

Mater’s oeuvre, from the satirical to the striking, details the changes, big and small, in a kingdom undergoing unprecedented social, religious and economic transformation.

“I think it’s a kind of synergistic study of all of the artwork together,” he said. “When you are an artist, you are also a philosopher, you are a thinker, and all of these events together shape our generation at a time, our societies.

“I was really fascinated by studying a community — about urban change surrounding me. Maybe I take this from medicine, maybe I take it from the art, or maybe I take it from my transition from the village to the city.”

In the photograph “Hajj Season” (2015), which is part of his “Desert of Pharan” collection documenting change in Makkah, masses of pilgrims wait patiently in a gated courtyard. Behind them, KFC and Burger King restaurants can be seen.

“Stand in the Pathway and See” (2012) shows a narrow alleyway bisecting dilapidated buildings, part of an old settlement that was soon to be demolished to make way for new hotels. A young boy sits in the shadows amid the waste and graffiti. The alley appears to be illuminated by the fierce glow of Makkah’s Clock Tower, which looms ominously, or as a figurative light at the end of the tunnel, over the old city.

The dual meaning of the photograph is a hallmark of Mater’s work. In “Nature Morte” (2012) and “Room With a View ($3,000/night)” (2012), Mater again reveals some of the peculiarities of Makkah’s transformation through simple photographs.

Left to right: ‘Nature Morte,’ ‘Stand in the Pathway and See’ and ‘Room With a View ($3,000/night).’ (AN photo)

In both, the Kaaba and masses of pilgrims are seen at a low angle through the windows of a luxury hotel room, replete with a bowl of decorative fruit and cable TV. Viewers will inevitably be divided in their reaction.

Mater’s status as a passive spectator taking the photographs reinforces his self-described role as a documenter of change, and is part of the subtlety that typifies much of his work.

For other pieces he takes a more direct approach, however. Viewers are met with loud beeping and flashing red lights in his simple but ingenious “Boundary” (2024), for example. The artist combines a mihrab, a prayer niche from the interior of a mosque, with a body scanner; the result is a striking summation of modern-day security fears and the commercialization of religion.

Viewers should expect a surprise with Mater’s modern mihrab. (AN photo)

Many of Mater’s works explore the theme of the individual sublimating to the group, which emerges as a distinct entity. This is epitomized in “Magnetism IV” (2012), a diminutive model of the Kaaba surrounded by perfectly arranged iron filings, representing a swirling mass of pilgrims.

The artist depicts the magnetism of Islam’s holiest site. (AN photo)

To create a similar effect in a photograph, Mater used a long exposure to capture the Kaaba at the height of Hajj in “Tawaf” (2013), an image in which the resulting movement of pilgrims resembles a hurricane around the holiest site in Islam.

The artist admits that the theme might be an unconscious effect of his Islamic upbringing.

A selection from Mater’s ‘Magnetism’ series (AN photo).

“I think it’s something that is unconsciously done by an artist in their practices,” he said. “You know, sometimes I didn’t pay full attention but after I did my artwork, I noticed. I noticed these kind of things. But maybe spirituality has this feeling.

“So, I come from a religious background and this has, maybe, shaped a lot of my understanding. It’s given me a lot of imagination. You know, religion is part of this big imagination.”

Long exposure creates a hurricane effect at the height of Hajj. (AN photo)

For Mater, 1938 might have been the most important year in the Kingdom’s history. Oil was struck on March 3 that year at the Dammam No. 7 well, and the liquid gold that began to flow would soon begin to finance the Kingdom’s transformation.

Again juxtaposing old and new, traditional and modern, in “Lightning Land” (2017) the artist captures a stunning shot of lightning arcing toward the ground, with a disused Bedouin tent in the foreground and oil machinery in the background.

Mater’s ‘Lightning Land’ highlights the tensions between old and new in Saudi Arabia. (AN photo)

“Evolution of Man” (1979) is Mater’s most morbid work. A horizontal collage begins with a front-on X-ray shot of a man holding a gun to his own head. The next shots morph as a square shape begins to form. The final image is a gas pump, with the nozzle resembling the gun featured in the first image.

The former physician’s prognosis of the Kingdom’s arts scene takes a more positive path, however. Mater believes that cooperation between the public and private sectors is the key to further unleashing Saudi Arabia’s burgeoning cultural industries.

A “big, big awakening of art and culture” is taking place in the Kingdom, he said. Mater himself is part of this public-private synthesis, and one of five leading artists commissioned by Wadi AlFann (Valley of the Arts) in AlUla to produce a large-scale installation in the desert sands.

The result is Ashab Al-Lal, a mighty but unintrusive oculus that will harness light refraction, in a homage to the scientists of the Islamic golden age. Wadi AlFann is set to open in 2025.

A model of Mater’s Ashab Al-Lal installation was unveiled at Christie’s. (AN photo) 

“I think now it’s a very optimistic generation; there is a lot of movement,” Mater said.

“So, it’s from both the private body and the public body, together shaping a new future. That’s what I’ve noticed today.”


Egyptian rapper Marwan Pablo on being a Diesel brand ambassador

Egyptian rapper Marwan Pablo on being a Diesel brand ambassador
Updated 17 July 2024
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Egyptian rapper Marwan Pablo on being a Diesel brand ambassador

Egyptian rapper Marwan Pablo on being a Diesel brand ambassador

CAIRO: Egyptian rap artist Marwan Pablo was recently named a regional brand ambassador for Italian fashion label Diesel — and the up-and-coming star spoke to Arab News about his relationship with the luxury brand.

"My connection with Diesel goes way back, long before I became an ambassador and one of its faces globally," the Alexandria-born rapper, whose real name is Marwan Matawa, said.

Known for his streetwear style, Pablo is not one to shy away from patterns and color — and that keen fashion sense was sparked by a gift from his father.

"My clothing and accessories now reflect my growing relationship with this luxury brand, which started back in 2007 or 2008 when I was in school and my father bought me a pair of Diesel jeans,” he explained. “That gift changed how I viewed and wore clothes for life. Those pieces remained with me for a long time … I feel a sense of daring and ambition with Diesel, something that I've busily incorporated into the brand's unique identity, which I find distinct from other youth-oriented brands."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by MARWAN PABLO (@marwanpablo_)

Born in 1995, the “Lelly Yah” hitmaker briefly quit music in 2020 citing personal reasons. He returned to the spotlight in 2021, however, with the hit track "Ghaba" that gained more than four million views on YouTube within the first 24 hours. His latest offering, "Al Mabda,” was released in 2024 and condemns the global silence over the attacks carried out by Israeli forces on the people of Gaza.

When asked about his future plans, the artist stressed the need to remain flexible, saying: "I always want to stay flexible and integrated, whether it's with my new music or my fashion style."

Meanwhile, Diesel took to social media to praise its new ambassador, saying: “Pablo's music serves as a raw and introspective canvas, drawing inspiration from his life experiences, thoughts, emotions, and the world around him.”