Sudan one of world’s ‘worst crises’ in decades: medical charity

Sudan one of world’s ‘worst crises’ in decades: medical charity
War has raged for more than a year. (FILE/AFP)
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Updated 21 June 2024
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Sudan one of world’s ‘worst crises’ in decades: medical charity

Sudan one of world’s ‘worst crises’ in decades: medical charity
  • War has raged for more than a year between the regular military under army chief Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan and the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces led by his former deputy Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo
  • Both sides have been accused of war crimes including deliberately targeting civilians, indiscriminate shelling of residential areas and blocking humanitarian aid

Port Sudan, Sudan: The ongoing civil war in Sudan has provoked one of the world’s worst humanitarian crises in decades, the international chief of the medical charity Doctors Without Borders said Thursday.
War has raged for more than a year between the regular military under army chief Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan and the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces led by his former deputy Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo.
“Sudan is one of the worst crises the world has seen for decades... yet the humanitarian response is profoundly inadequate,” Christos Christou, international president of Doctors Without Borders (MSF), said on social media platform X.
“There are extreme levels of suffering across the country, and the needs are growing by the day,” he added.
The conflict, which began in April 2023 has resulted in tens of thousands of deaths and displaced more than nine million people, according to the United Nations.
Both sides have been accused of war crimes including deliberately targeting civilians, indiscriminate shelling of residential areas and blocking humanitarian aid, despite warnings that millions are on the brink of starvation.
Rights groups and the United States have also accused the paramilitaries of ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity.


Princess Rajwa shows off growing bump during outing with Prince Hussein

Princess Rajwa shows off growing bump during outing with Prince Hussein
Updated 7 min 34 sec ago
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Princess Rajwa shows off growing bump during outing with Prince Hussein

Princess Rajwa shows off growing bump during outing with Prince Hussein
  • Royal couple visit firm creating content on social issues
  • Prince lauds company’s focus on mental health concerns

DUBAI: Princess Rajwa of Jordan once again showcased her impeccable maternity style this week alongside Crown Prince Hussein bin Abdullah during their visit to Digitales Media, a local company that creates content on social issues.

The princess, who is from Saudi Arabia, wore Max Mara’s Drina silk-and-linen dress in a warm, brown color. It featured a high waistline that accommodated her maternity figure, with a softly pleated skirt of mid-calf length.

The dress had long sleeves with subtle cuff detailing and a gently gathered neckline.

The princess paired her outfit with a pink Fendi leather purse and matching pink satin ballet flats from Miu Miu.  

“Rajwa and I were delighted to visit Digitales today ... A Jordanian company creating impactful content on social issues and mental health,” the prince wrote on his Instagram, with pictures from the visit.

The royal couple, who announced the pregnancy in April, are expecting their first child this summer.

Since then, Princess Rajwa has been turning heads with her maternity style.

In May, she was spotted shopping in Amman wearing a blue denim jumpsuit from the Tencel Denim Maternity range by British label Seraphine.

She completed her look with white sneakers and accessorized with a Bottega Veneta Mini Cabat leather tote bag.

In her first maternity pictures, which were released on June 1, she donned a Vernia red blouson sleeve pleated maxi dress by Alice + Olivia, a contemporary clothing brand based in New York City.

The flowy, summery dress was cinched at the waist, accentuating her growing bump, and featured a V-shaped neckline.

On June 10, she attended King Abdullah’s silver jubilee celebrations in Amman, in a bespoke gown by Saudi Arabia designer Honayda Serafi.

This was just over a year after she wore an all-white look by the same designer for her pre-wedding henna celebrations.


Ramy Youssef nabs Emmy nomination for directing ‘The Bear’ episode

Ramy Youssef nabs Emmy nomination for directing ‘The Bear’ episode
Updated 20 min 46 sec ago
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Ramy Youssef nabs Emmy nomination for directing ‘The Bear’ episode

Ramy Youssef nabs Emmy nomination for directing ‘The Bear’ episode

DUBAI: US Egyptian comedian, writer and actor Ramy Youusef has nabbed himself a Primetime Emmy Awards nomination for Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series.

Youssef earned the nomination for directing “The Bear” episode titled “Honeydew” from its second season.

The fan-loved episode focused on the character Marcus, the lovable pastry chef portrayed by actor Lionel Boyce.

This is the third Emmy nomination for Youssef and his second for directing, after earning a 2020 nomination for directing an episode of his eponymous series “Ramy.” 

For this year’s Emmys, Youssef competes against “The Bear” series creator Christopher Storer for the episode “Fishes,” Guy Ritchie for “The Gentlemen,” Lucia Aniello for “Hacks,” Randall Einhorn for “Abbott Elementary,” and Mary Lou Belli for “The Ms Pat Show.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by The Bear (@thebearfx)

Overall, “Shogun” led the nominations with 25 nods, including limited series, and earned first-time acting nods for Hiroyuki Sanada and Anna Sawai.

Additionally, the FX network garnered a total of 93 nominations, bolstered by a record-breaking 23 nods for “The Bear.”


Saudi Arabia calls for UN Security Council resolution to compel Israel to end war, ‘starvation’ of Gazans

Saudi Arabia calls for UN Security Council resolution to compel Israel to end war, ‘starvation’ of Gazans
Updated 38 min 38 sec ago
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Saudi Arabia calls for UN Security Council resolution to compel Israel to end war, ‘starvation’ of Gazans

Saudi Arabia calls for UN Security Council resolution to compel Israel to end war, ‘starvation’ of Gazans
  • Tel Aviv must end its ‘aggression’ and allow for urgent delivery of humanitarian aid to besieged Gaza
  • UN failure to stop Israel driven by ‘short-sighted, selfish political interests,’ says Saudi envoy Abdulaziz Alwasil

NEW YORK: Saudi Arabia’s permanent representative to the UN, Abdulaziz Alwasil, on Wednesday called on the UN Security Council to adopt a resolution that would compel Israel to end its war on Gaza.

Alwasil said Tel Aviv must comply with the Security Council’s own resolutions, which call for an immediate ceasefire and the delivery of aid into Gaza.

He said Israel, as the occupying power, must be forced to respect international law. This includes implementing the International Court of Justice’s provisional measures to end the genocide being perpetrated on the Palestinian people.

Alwasil said the UN Security Council, since the beginning of the assault on Gaza 10 months ago, has been holding “meeting after meeting to no avail.”

Meanwhile, the world continues to witness the Israeli “war machine deliberately targeting civilians and imposing the harshest forms of collective punishment by killing, displacing, starving and imposing a blockade on civilians.”

Alwasil added: “All of these blatant violations are happening before the eyes of the world and the international community continues to turn a blind eye.

“And this inaction pushed the occupation power, which is hiding behind a solid wall, to take advantage of this weakness and international silence to impose its inhumane, violent practices unabated.”

The Saudi Arabia envoy was speaking at a signature UN Security Council meeting called by Russia, which is holding the rotating presidency of the body for the month of July. It was chaired by Moscow’s Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov.

Alwasil lamented the failure of the Security Council to stop the war, which he blamed on members of the body being bound by “short-sighted, selfish political interests that have impeded its ability to take the necessary firm actions to stop the Israeli aggression.”

“The failure by the international community and the Security Council to protect the innocent civilians has led so far to the killing of 38,000 people and the injury and maiming of tens of thousands, most of whom are women and children,” said Alwasil.

He added: “How can such a forced displacement that is recurrent in Gaza be justified? How can we stay silent in the face of this systematic starvation and deliberative blockade? How can the international community stand idly while a major humanitarian catastrophe is taking place before our eyes?”

Alwasil vowed that his country would continue to support the Palestinian right to self-determination and the establishment of a state on the lines of 1967 with East Jerusalem as the capital.

This would “ensure comprehensive justice (and) peace in line with the Arab Peace Initiative and the relevant resolutions of international legitimacy.”


Global financial information service warns political risk could threaten Pakistan’s economic gains

Global financial information service warns political risk could threaten Pakistan’s economic gains
Updated 18 July 2024
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Global financial information service warns political risk could threaten Pakistan’s economic gains

Global financial information service warns political risk could threaten Pakistan’s economic gains
  • Fitch’s BMI says another flood or drought in Pakistan may pose a significant risk to the country’s agricultural economy
  • It says if the current government is replaced, Pakistan will be run by technocrats instead of moving toward fresh polls

ISLAMABAD: A leading international financial information service warned on Wednesday Pakistan’s current political turmoil could derail its fragile national economy, despite recent improvements in macroeconomic indicators.

The warning was issued by Business Monitor International (BMI), part of Fitch Group, in a comprehensive country risk report on Pakistan, including 10-year forecasts extending to 2033.

The report noted the country’s economic activity in the last fiscal year was stronger than most analysts had expected.

However, it also highlighted several internal and external risk factors that could impact the ongoing economic efforts of Pakistan’s current coalition administration.

“The country’s fragile political situation could ... derail the recovery,” the BMI report noted. “While Pakistan’s establishment parties were successful in creating a new coalition government following the February election, the strong electoral performance of independent candidates backed by jailed opposition leader Imran Khan suggests that there is significant dissatisfaction with the current political elite. Another round of protests in urban areas could disrupt economic activity.”

The report also maintained Pakistan’s economy remained prone to other shocks.

“Given that 40 percent of Pakistanis work in agriculture, another flood or drought would pose a significant risk to the economy,” it added.

The BMI report said Pakistani policymakers were likely to miss their ambitious budget targets, though they would manage to narrow the deficit, “slipping from 7.4 percent in FY2023/24 to 6.7 percent of GDP in FY2024/25.”

It also predicted that the current government would remain in power over the coming 18 months and succeed in pushing through with the fiscal reforms recommended by the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

“In the unlikely event that the government is replaced,” it continued, “the most likely alternative is a military-backed technocratic administration rather than fresh elections.”


Death inevitable, says preacher at center of Indian stampede disaster

Death inevitable, says preacher at center of Indian stampede disaster
Updated 18 July 2024
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Death inevitable, says preacher at center of Indian stampede disaster

Death inevitable, says preacher at center of Indian stampede disaster
  • Bhole Baba: ‘I am very distressed by what happened, but who can possibly challenge fate?’
  • Police constable-turned-preacher spoke to local media at one of his monasteries in Kasganj

NEW DELHI: An Indian preacher whose latest sermon ended in a deadly stampede that killed more than 120 people insisted that fate could not be challenged and death was inevitable.
In his first appearance before the media since July 2, when 121 people were crushed to death following a sermon he delivered in the northern city of Hathras, Bhole Baba said he was upset by the tragedy.
“I am very distressed by what happened, but who can possibly challenge fate?” he said.
“Whoever comes to this earth has to go one day — it is only a matter of when.”
The police constable-turned-preacher spoke to local media Wednesday at one of his monasteries in Kasganj, around 60 kilometers from the stampede site.
Baba’s lawyer had earlier said “anti-social elements” in the crowd were responsible.
The prayer meeting was attended by 250,000 devotees, more than three times the authorized number. The vast majority of fatalities were women.
A police report issued after the stampede named several organizers of the prayer meeting sought for arrest, but Baba was not among them.
So far 11 volunteers working for him have been arrested.
Religious gatherings in India have a grim track record of deadly incidents caused by poor crowd management and safety lapses.
In 2008, 224 pilgrims were killed and more than 400 injured in a stampede at a hilltop temple in the northern city of Jodhpur.