Smoking ban aimed to reduce teen smoking

Updated 02 August 2012

Smoking ban aimed to reduce teen smoking

The Ministry of Interior has ordered provincial governors to enforce a public smoking ban in government buildings and other public places with the aim of cutting smoking among young people and encourage Saudis and expatriates to look after their health better.
Anti-smoking groups praised Interior Minister Prince Ahmed’s directive, but restaurant owners said it would harm business.
The ban also includes shisha served in restaurants and cafes, as well as all ministries, government departments, and public establishments.
The minister said in a statement: “Since we are a Muslim country, it is our duty to serve as a model for adherence to Islamic law, which encourage people to protect their wealth, interests and general health against harmful acts.
“Therefore, it is compulsory to ensure the implementation of the smoking ban in government departments and public sector agencies.
“There should also be a total ban at enclosed public locations including coffee houses, restaurants, commercial establishments, and crowded places.
“The ban includes shisha, which is not at all less dangerous than cigarettes.”
Workers in the private sector hailed the ruling, noting many private businesses have already implemented a smoking ban in their offices.
Ahmed Al-Olyian, a civic engineer who works in a construction company in Jeddah, said: “It is a good decision. However, many companies in the private sector already banned smoking in their buildings.
“We are waiting now for the smoking ban to be applied in public places, especially the restaurants.”
Ali Moaatez, an employee at the Presidency of Meteorology and Environment, said he sees the ban as an incentive to help him quit smoking, but he expressed skepticism about its impact on smokers.
He added: “This decision may help me to give up smoking.
“I am working for a governmental body, but I think I will face difficulties adhering to the ban.”
The ban follows a recommendation in November by the National Committee on Fighting Tobacco to take stringent measures to stop selling tobacco products to people under 18.
In June, the Ministry of Municipal and Rural Affairs banned the sale of cigarettes to under 18s.
Saudi Arabia ranks fourth in terms of global tobacco imports and consumption.
Saudis smoke annually more than 15 billion cigarettes worth $ 168 million, according to the Gulf Cooperation Council.
Prince Ahmed warned retailers not sell tobacco to people under 18 under any circumstances, adding individuals should report any violations to authorities.
Restaurants and café owners say they may face difficulties in enforcing the smoking ban.
They said their profits depend on customers who enjoy shisha.
Abo Manaf, owner of Caza Cafe in Jeddah, said: “The decision was surprising to me.”
“If it is applied soon, customer numbers will drop.
“All my profits depend on shisha and shisha customers represent around 75 percent of my clients.”
Waleed Mosa, an Eritrean employee in the private sector and regular café shisha smoker, said the transition to a smoke and shisha-free environment in cafes would be difficult.
He said: “I cannot imagine restaurants without smoking or cafés without shisha.
“If the decision is applied all cafés will lose their customers.”
Suleiman Al-Sabi, secretary-general of Naqa’a (purity), an anti-smoking charity society, said he hoped the ban would cut the number of teenage smokers by half.
He said teenagers and young adults account for 27 percent of total smokers in the Kingdom.
Municipalities fine shops that sell cigarettes to minors up to SR 500.
The Kingdom is a signatory to the Tobacco Control Treaty launched by the World Health Organization (WHO) in May 2003.
According to the treaty, signatories should ban or restrict advertising and other tobacco company marketing efforts.
In addition, health warnings should cover at least 30 percent of the surface of a pack of cigarettes.
All materials used to make tobacco products should be listed on the packaging.
The agreement also urges governments to strengthen indoor smoking laws, to place high taxes on tobacco and develop strategies to stop the sale of black market cigarettes.
Majid Al-Muneef, supervisor general of the anti-smoking department in the Ministry of Health, said the ministry and the Ministry of Education were working together to developing an effective awareness program among students in secondary schools.


Saudi Arabia’s Alkhobar becomes international role model for business continuity

Sultan Al-Zaidi (L) and Fahad Al-Jubeir.
Updated 21 September 2020

Saudi Arabia’s Alkhobar becomes international role model for business continuity

  • Alkhobar has pushed for a paperless municipality and emphasized the introduction of online services for residents

JEDDAH: Alkhobar municipality, along with Europe’s largest industrial manufacturing company Siemens, has been hailed as a role model for management excellence and business continuity.
The municipality has been awarded international certification for its excellence in managing crises and risks under difficult circumstances, in recognition of its administrative achievements during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Quality Austria (QA) awarded Alkhobar Municipality and Siemens with ISO 22301 and ISO 9001 certificates, which are concerned with business continuity management, especially during the pandemic.
ISO (International Organization for Standardization) is an independent and nongovernmental body. Its standards are internationally agreed by experts and are seen as the best way of doing something.
Alkhobar has pushed for a paperless municipality and emphasized the introduction of online services for residents.
Its mayor, Sultan bin Hamid Al-Zaidi, said that the municipality’s ISO achievement was in line with achieving the goals of the Eastern Province municipality. He added that the aim was to make Alkhobar a distinguished city, like other places in the province.
The Mayor of the Eastern Province, Fahad bin Mohammed Al-Jubeir, said that municipalities were keen to implement the most advanced administrative systems and provide the best services to beneficiaries.
“This comes in line with the objectives of municipal transformation, part of the National Transformation Program 2020 of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 reform plan which states that the Kingdom, with its outputs and services, should provide an international role model of quality and mastery, and raise the level of services provided by services and economic development agencies and enterprises,” Al-Jubeir told Arab News.

HIGHLIGHT

Business continuity was primarily done through strategic planning and taking into account the different local factors and needs of provinces and municipalities.

He added that the municipality had launched initiatives and programs seeking to make the Eastern Province and its governorates pioneers in administrative and service qualities, as well as improving public services.
According to QA’s regional manager, Dr. Mohamed Hassan, business continuity was primarily done through strategic planning and taking into account the different local factors and needs of provinces and municipalities.
“These instructions are then transformed into applicable programs and strategies at the amana (provincial government) level,” he wrote in an article. “Since the Eastern Province is, in this respect, the leading province in the Kingdom, the guidelines are finalized in consultation with the EP’s mayor, Fahad Al-Jubeir.”
The article gave examples of Alkhobar’s strategic emergency plans and said it had made arrangements with companies such as Al-Yamama for the prevention of damage from flash floods or storms.
It added that other public contractors, such as Nabatat, ensured that green spaces and parks in the city remained relaxing destinations for people, even on exceptionally hot summer days.
“A successful example of service digitization is the Balady software, which makes all municipality services available to citizens online. Moreover, the Balagat software offers a service in which complaints and suggestions from citizens can be reported and followed up online,” the article said. “If a complaint is not solved within 24 hours, it is automatically forwarded to the mayor of the Eastern Province, Al-Jubeir.”
The ministry’s foresight in initiating plans and preparations, the online software systems used and the high-quality standards in the municipality all helped in increasing the effectiveness of the business continuity management system.