Cyber attacks threaten 69% of Saudi firms

Updated 10 January 2013

Cyber attacks threaten 69% of Saudi firms

JEDDAH: Computer security software corporation Symantec has revealed to Al-Eqtisadiah newspaper that 69 percent of Saudi companies cannot cope with cyber attacks due to their “lack of data backup operations on daily basis”.
Samer Sidani, regional director of Symantec Saudi Arabia, told the paper that “Corporate data and information is a direct communication link with users; therefore, it has great importance and priority.”
Sidani indicated that companies in Saudi Arabia show sufficient awareness in the importance of keeping backup copies of important information, such as company data, customer records, and legal documents. However, this process remains hanging on the list of actions that will be undertaken by these companies in the future, when it will be too late.
At the same time, he pointed out that only 31 percent of small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Saudi Arabia undertake a data backup process, through which they can retrieve data loss caused by cyber attacks, on a daily basis.
Sidani highlighted on the increasing number of cyber attacks directed at companies in the Middle East – hence the importance of having security solutions in place – and on the need for strong data backup and a restore strategy in the workplace. This would protect the information from all types of emergencies ranging from power cutoffs to physical damage of the infrastructure and cyber attacks that can put the company information and data at risk, or lead to systems crashes and damage computers in the company.
From this standpoint, Symantec gives advice to enterprises during its assessment of backup policy and its data recovery plan after facing emergencies. These tips evolve around the importance of having a plan, Sidani said, indicating the common excuses for the lack of plan in the company, such as “We have paper records”, “The backup process is expensive compared to the few data we have”, and “The backup process is complex and wasting time”. Meanwhile, it is difficult to quantify the massive costs of the collapse of work systems in the company as well as the loss of data and important documents, although he considered the lack of a master plan to act accordingly in emergencies within the company in itself a disaster.
Sidani pointed to the importance of a testing data recovery strategy to ensure the strategy operates optimally.
He also stressed on the importance of backups that are stored outside the company, although that requires an additional step or two.
The regional director clarified that the consolidation of backups in all work environments using a single solution to get physical and virtual backups will reduce operating costs and the size of your storage. It will also speed up the process of retrieving data, he said.
Sidani explained that the merger between the backup process and data recovery tools is one of the most important steps in information security. It would reduce costs and at the same time simplify the day-to-day operations.
Implementing the above-mentioned proposals would ensure that there is a stable and consistent database can be relied upon to start the application process of appropriate solution to overcome the emergencies situations, and successful recovery of data in your company.
He advised people to select the most comfortable solution that ensures appropriate and complete data recovery in their work environment and will enhance the feeling of complete confidence that the vital lifeline of their company is strongly protected.


NASA finds Indian moon lander with help of amateur space enthusiast

Updated 03 December 2019

NASA finds Indian moon lander with help of amateur space enthusiast

  • NASA released an image taken by its Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter that showed the site of the spacecraft’s impact
  • A version of the picture was marked up to show the associated debris field

WASHINGTON: India’s Vikram lunar lander, which crashed on its final approach to the Moon’s surface in September, has been found thanks in part to the sleuthing efforts of an amateur space enthusiast.
NASA made the announcement on Monday, releasing an image taken by its Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) that showed the site of the spacecraft’s impact (September 7 in India and September 6 in the US).
A version of the picture was marked up to show the associated debris field, with parts scattered over almost two dozen locations spanning several kilometers.
In a statement, NASA said it released a mosaic image of the site on September 26 (but taken on September 17), inviting the public to compare it with images of the same area before the crash to find signs of the lander.
The first person to come up with a positive identification was Shanmuga “Shan” Subramanian, a 33-year-old IT professional from Chennai, who said that NASA’s inability to find the lander on its own had sparked his interest.
“I had side-by-side comparison of those two images on two of my laptops ... on one side there was the old image, and another side there was the new image released by NASA,” he said, adding he was helped by fellow Twitter and Reddit users.
“It was quite hard, but (I) spent some effort,” said the self-professed space nerd, finally announcing his discovery on Twitter on October 3.
NASA then performed additional searches in the area and officially announced the finding almost two months later.
“NASA has to be 100% sure before they can go public, and that’s the reason they waited to confirm it, and even I would have done the same,” said Subramanian.
Blasting off in July, emerging Asian giant India had hoped with its Chandrayaan-2 (“Moon Vehicle 2“) mission to become just the fourth country after the United States, Russia and regional rival China to make a successful Moon landing, and the first on the lunar south pole.
The main spacecraft, which remains in orbit around the Moon, dropped the unmanned lander Vikram for a descent that would take five days, but the probe went silent just 2.1 kilometers above the surface.
Days after the failed landing, the Indian Space Research Organization said it had located the lander, but hadn’t been able to establish communication.