Training Saudi auto engineers

Training Saudi auto engineers
Updated 07 June 2012

Training Saudi auto engineers

Training Saudi auto engineers

The Saudi Japanese Automobile High Institute (SJAHI), which has been playing an important role in meeting the needs of Saudi automobile market, recently celebrated its 10th anniversary after producing nearly 2,000 graduates.
The celebration, which was officiated by Jeddah Gov. Prince Mishaal bin Majed, also marked the graduation of 216 students. "I am very happy to see the tremendous progress achieved by SJAHI over the past years,” the governor told the gathering.
Prince Mishaal said he was delighted to see a number of enthusiastic Saudis mastering automobile technology at the institute. During the ceremony, the governor also launched the alumni association for SJAHI graduates.
In his welcome address, Salim Al-Asmari, executive director of SJAHI, thanked Prince Mishaal for his support for the institute. He said 1,935 students have graduated from the institute since it was established in 2002.
Ali Al-Ghafees, governor of Technical and Vocational Training Corporation, said the institute has made remarkable contributions toward Saudi Arabia's technological advancement. He praised the Japanese government and officials as well as the Human Resource Development Fund for their support.
Speaking at the function, Satoshi Miyamoto, deputy director-general of the Manufacturing Industries Bureau at the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, highlighted the importance of the Saudi auto market.
“More than 520,000 cars were sold in the Kingdom in 2010 with Japanese cars accounting for the highest number with a market share of 50 percent," Miyamoto said. He commended the contributions of SJAHI graduates and automobile agents in boosting trade.
Japanese Ambassador Shigeru Endo also spoke during the event and highlighted the strong relations between the two countries.
SJAHI was the outcome of Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah's historic visit to Japan in 1998 when he was crown prince. In a statement on the occasion, Muhammad Abdul Latif Jameel, president of SJAHI’s Council of Partners, thanked King Abdullah for donating 72,000 sq. m. land for the institute.
The Saudi automobile market requires 200,000 technicians, which are now mostly expatriates. Saudis graduating from the institute have been working in maintenance centers of automobile companies across the Kingdom.
Osamu Nagata, managing officer, Toyota Motor Corporation and chairman, International Committee of JAMA (Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association), said SJAHI led to the establishment of other joint ventures such as the Saudi-Japanese Institute for Plastics and Saudi-Japanese Institute for Electronics.
"A new institute has been opened in Riyadh to train Saudis on the maintenance of elevators,” he pointed out.
Managed by a professionally accredited team, SJAHI has been supported by organizations like TVTC, Japan International Cooperation Agency, JAMA and Japan Automobile Distributors in the Kingdom. SJAHI stands as a symbol of strong Saudi-Japanese relations and cooperation.
The Kingdom’s automobile sector is growing at a fast pace and requires constant update of technology and skills, both in terms of technical know-how as well as practical competency. There is a shortage of skilled and competent Saudi technicians in the market and institute has been trying to fill this vacuum.