Kingdom names Iraq ambassador

Updated 03 June 2015

Kingdom names Iraq ambassador

JEDDAH: Newly appointed Saudi ambassadors to Iraq, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nigeria, Peru and Guinea took oath in front of Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman on Tuesday. The king urged the new envoys to work toward strengthening the Kingdom’s foreign ties.
Thamir bin Sabhan Al-Sabhan is the new ambassador to Baghdad. Saudi Arabia is appointing a residential ambassador in Iraq after a break of 24 years. It closed its embassy in Baghdad in 1991 after Saddam Hussein’s regime invaded Kuwait.
Relations between Saudi Arabia and Iraq have improved markedly since Haider Al-Abadi took over as prime minister in September 2014. Al-Sabhan is a former Saudi military attaché to Lebanon. Abdullah bin Marzouk Al-Zahrani is the new Saudi ambassador to Pakistan while Abdullah bin Hajjaj Al-Mutairy is the ambassador to Bangladesh.
Munir bin Ibrahim Bunjabi has been appointed ambassador to Peru, Fahd bin Abdullah Al-Sufyan to Nigeria and Sulaiman bin Saleh Al-Fareeh to Guinea.
Other new ambassadors who met with King Salman on Tuesday were: Eid bin Mohammed Al-Thaqafi (Oman), Khaled bin Musaed Al-Anqari (Austria), Ahmed bin Younus Al-Barrak (Japan) and Hani bin Abdullah Mumina (Bosnia-Herzegovina).


Saudi authorities arrest coronavirus curfew violator after posting haircut video

Updated 01 April 2020

Saudi authorities arrest coronavirus curfew violator after posting haircut video

  • Saudi prosecutor warned of legal consequences earlier
  • Violators could be fined up to $796,880 and jailed for up to 5 years

DUBAI: Saudi police arrested a man in Al-Qassim who violated coronavirus regulations by bringing a barber into his home, state news agency SPA reported.
Videos circulating on social media showed the man as he asked a barber to come into his house after authorities temporarily closed down barber shops and salons to curb the spread of COVID-19.
The Saudi public prosecutor has previously warned that anyone posting content on social media, including photos or videos showing curfew violations, or the flouting of any rules enforced to prevent the spread of COVID-19 face prosecution.
In a message posted on Twitter, the bureau said that perpetrators will be charged under Article Six of the Information Crime Prevention Law, which carries a punishment of up to five years in prison and a fine of up to $796,880. 
The punishment will be applied to violators but informers will not be questioned, it added.