How to shimmer in the summer

How to shimmer in the summer
Updated 14 July 2012

How to shimmer in the summer

How to shimmer in the summer

We live in a country that deals with dry spells year round. So let’s join in the seasonal summer frenzy and learn how to keep you looking gorgeous while the sun shines down on you.

Summer fruits
First thing to do when you prepare to step out of the house: up the SPF!
I don’t recommend using chemically-loaded sunscreen lotions. They pose a long list of health risks. Instead, build up internal immunity by adding kiwis, blueberries and apricots to your summer fruit basket. Fruits and vegetables in the red and purple color scheme are rich in anti-oxidants, offering natural protection against the harmful effects of our bountiful sunrays. I’m sure you never enjoyed a tastier sunscreen.

Slather it on
Which means? Moisturize, moisturize and moisturize! Your body tends to lose more water during summer, leaving it dry, dehydrated and lifeless. The excess sun-kissing, the long hours spent in your chlorinated pool, and the constant exposure to air conditioners add to your skin’s summer woes. Remember to use a light cream-based hydrating lotion appropriate for your skin type and you’re ready to go!

Oomph the eye factor
Apart from adding glitz and glamour to that already stylish face, sunglasses remain an essential summer accessory. They help to protect your eyes from troublesome sores like burning, cataract and macular degeneration that may appear later in life from careless glaring in the heat. The most important factor to keep in mind while selecting a pair is to check whether they provide SPF protection to filter out the damaging rays of the sun.

Cleopatra’s cotton
Our often-cursed “tent-clothing” (abayas, really), provide the best style of apparel to keep the body breathing especially during summer. Experiment with stylish cotton abayas in pastel colors to keep you cool and collected. Wearing appropriate light summer materials also prevent embarrassing episodes of body odor. Throw out the polyester, please.

Footloose
Summer is a great time to show off those cute little tootsies. Treat them to a well-deserved pedicure. Wash your feet regularly to remove dirt, sweat and grime that can cause foot odor. Exfoliate your feet twice a week either with scrub or a pumice stone to remove dead cells and encourage skin regeneration. Top it up with a special foot moisturizer to keep them soft. Wear comfortable and airy footwear to prevent fungal infections and warts common during the summer months from the increased heat and humidity that builds up in closed, suffocating shoes. Allow your feet to breathe to keep you moving.

Load up on H2O
Make sure that you are getting enough water. Dehydration symptoms can be very mild before getting serious. Don’t wait until you get thirsty. Pay attention to headaches, fatigue, dry lips and mouth. Dump the thick artificial juices loaded with preservatives and sugar. Instead, carry a cool sipper with fresh summer juices prepared at home with fruits like lime and watermelon. These make great daylong thirst quenchers minus the excess calories!

Ditch the tan
While a little bit of sun is good for us women holed up indoors for most part of the day, too much of it makes us look like roasted chickens! Sun helps the body produce vitamin D, which is good for your bones. Excessive sun exposure can cause premature ageing, wrinkles, and increase the chances of developing skin cancer.
A 10-20 minute hike everyday across the street in broad daylight (minus the sunscreen) that causes a slight flushing of the skin is just about good for you to soak up the benefits of the sun.

Ventilate
Before cranking up the air-conditioning when you enter your car, make sure you roll down those windows for a good few minutes of the ride. Some research data suggests that benzene fumes are released from cars bathing in the summer heat, which have long been linked to producing diseases like cancer and anemia. Ventilate for a few minutes to prevent breathing trapped carcinogens circulating in the car.