Imams receive government directive for Ramadan

Imams receive government directive for Ramadan
Updated 13 July 2012

Imams receive government directive for Ramadan

Imams receive government directive for Ramadan

The Riyadh branch of the Ministry of Islamic Affairs, Endowments, Call and Guidance recently issued guidelines for imams for the month of Ramadan.
Imams in Riyadh are not permitted to collect unauthorized donations to organize iftar dinners in mosques. “Licensed charity organizations are the only agencies permitted to organize fast-breaking dinners,” Abdullah Al-Hamid, director general of the ministry’s Riyadh branch said recently.
The ministry has banned unlicensed preaching activities in mosques during the month of Ramadan. “Mosques should remain open 24 hours a day during the blessed month. Imams should stick to prayer timings specified in the Umm Al-Qura calendar and give prayer calls accordingly,” said Al-Hamid. The adhan for the Isha prayer should be called two hours after the Maghreb adhan.
Loudspeakers may not be used for taraweeh and qiyamallail. Internal speakers are permitted in mosques for taraweeh prayers. Mosques may use external loud speakers for congregational prayers but should not disrupt prayer in nearby mosques. Not more than four external horns in four directions can be used. Mosques are not permitted to install devices to jam mobile phones. Imams are instructed to receive permission from the ministry if there is need to delegate their duty of leading taraweeh prayers to another imam.


Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, Iraqi president discuss cooperation

Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, Iraqi president discuss cooperation
Updated 3 min 49 sec ago

Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, Iraqi president discuss cooperation

Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, Iraqi president discuss cooperation
  • They discussed relations and ways of enhancing them in all fields

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman received a phone call from Iraqi President Barham Salih, Saudi Press Agency reported on Tuesday.
During the call, they reviewed relations between the two countries, in addition to discussing ways of enhancing bilateral cooperation in a way that serves the interests of the two countries in various fields, within the framework of the Saudi-Iraqi Coordination Council.
Saudi Arabia and Iraq opened the Arar border crossing for trade for the first time in three decades in November last year. The crossing had been closed since 1990 after the two countries cut ties following Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait.
Also in November, a Saudi delegation led by the Kingdom’s commerce and industry and agricultural ministers visited Baghdad as part of the framework of the Saudi-Iraqi Coordination Council and the Economic, Trade, Investment, Development and Joint Relief Committee.
A Saudi-Iraqi businessmen forum was also launched on the side-lines of the visit, under the auspices of the Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kadhimi. 
The Saudi-Iraqi rapprochement extends back to 2015, when Saudi Arabia reopened its embassy in Baghdad following a 25-year break.
In July Saudi Arabia and Iraq signed investment agreements on energy and sports.