‘Criminalize abuse of Prophet’

Updated 07 December 2013

‘Criminalize abuse of Prophet’

Delegates at a conference here have called on governments of Muslim majority nations to seek a United Nations resolution that would make the abuse of Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him), other prophets and caliphs a criminal offense.
This was one of several resolutions adopted by the World Conference on the Prophet (pbuh) organized by the Madinah Islamic University this week.
Delegates also recommended that a research center be set up, named the King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Center for Studies and Research on the life and achievements of the Prophet (pbuh).
The conference recommended that Crown Prince Salman oversee these studies and that the university run the center.
The recommendations were tabled during the closing session of the conference, chaired by Abdul Rahman bin Abdullah Al-Sanad, director of the Islamic University. The conference had five sessions of dialogue and discussions.
The conference recommended organizing a workshop at the university for human rights activists from Arab and Islamic countries to develop a binding charter to protect Islam and the name of Prophet Muhammad (pbuh).
Other resolutions adopted by the delegates included the recognition of the greatness of Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) and the need for Muslims to respect, admire and pray for him, his family, wives and companions.
The conference commended the efforts of the organizations, agencies and educational institutions that have acknowledged and supported Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) and his message.
The delegates also called on Muslims to spread the message of Islam to non-Muslims globally through print and electronic media on all platforms in all languages, and for businesspeople to invest in these projects.
The conference recommended that the university hold seminars and courses inside and outside the Kingdom to acknowledge the rights and achievements of Prophet Muhammad (pbuh).
The delegates also invited Islamic associations and universities to implement programs, conferences, meetings, and printing of scientific research and theses on the biography of Prophet Muhammad (pbuh).
The participants wanted an encyclopedia published in various languages to cover the prophet’s solutions to ethical, social and economic issues. They also called on various government ministries to establish permanent and mobile exhibitions on the legacy and message of the Prophet (pbuh).
The conference called on Islamic governments to direct their embassies in various countries around the world to carry the message of Islam and Prophet Muhammad (pbuh).
The conference thanked the Ministry of Education for allocating parts of its school and university curricula to the study of Islam and the Prophet (pbuh), and urged other countries to do the same.
The participants also wanted an award created for the best research into the life of the Prophet (pbuh), to be named after King Abdullah and run by the Islamic University.
The delegates recommended that the conference be held every three years at the Islamic University. The participants also recommended sending a telegram of thanks and gratitude to King Abdullah for supporting the conference and the university.


Riyadh roads turn green as world’s largest urban greening project branches out

Based on experience, roads and streets without trees contain eight to 10 times the amount of dust compared with streets lined with trees on both sides. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 03 August 2020

Riyadh roads turn green as world’s largest urban greening project branches out

  • Capital gets a facelift as Vision 2030 program works to plant 7.5 million trees
  • Most of the tree species used in the project are from a well-developed local environment with low agricultural service and care

RIYADH: The Green Riyadh project, one of the world’s largest urban greening initiatives, is rapidly bearing fruit as it transforms main roads in the capital.

Major thoroughfares, including King Khalid, Makkah and King Salman roads, are getting a facelift as part of the Vision 2030 goal of improving quality of life in the city.
Dr. Fahad Al-Mana, a professor of Ornamental Plants, Gardens and Green Areas at King Saud University, told Arab News that native tree species being used for the project include Ziziphus spina-christi, Acacia gerrardii and Prosopis cineraria, commonly known as the ghaf tree.
According to Al-Mana, the trees can survive in harsh desert conditions and will grow without intensive agricultural care.
“Most of the tree species used in the planting of the Green Riyadh project are from a well-developed local environment with low agricultural service and care,” he said.
Environmental conditions in Riyadh were taken into account during the tree selection process. The species can grow to a large size in only three years.
“In some locations, they have moved large 3-year-old local trees that were taken care of in plant nurseries to new locations where they are growing successfully,” Al-Mana said.
Green Riyadh will increase the amount of greenery in the city and augment the green cover in the Saudi capital with the planting of 7.5 million trees around the city’s main features and facilities.
The project will reduce the average ambient temperature by 2 degrees Celsius and improve air quality, encouraging people to follow a healthier lifestyle by walking or cycling.

FASTFACTS

• The project will reduce the average ambient temperature by 2 degrees Celsius and improve air quality, encouraging people to follow a healthier lifestyle by walking or cycling.

• The project will maximize the use of recycled water in irrigation works by increasing usage from 90,000 cubic meters per day to more than 1 million cubic meters per day through the construction of a new recycled water network.

• Green space in the city will increase from 5 percent to 9 percent by 2030

“The aim of planting trees in the streets is to provide shade and moderate the temperature, especially in summer, which contributes to the purification of air and reduces environmental pollution by protecting the city from sand storms, winds and dust. In addition, it gives an aesthetic view and the element of nature enters the city and nearby structures,” said Al-Mana.
He added that trees, especially those planted in central street islands, must have long trunks and high branches to avoid hindering the movement of pedestrians and cars. The trunk must measure at least 3 to 4 meters and the size of the trees planted must be proportional to the width of the island.
Al-Mana said green space in the city will increase from 5 percent to 9 percent by 2030.
According to the Green Riyadh website, the project will maximize the use of recycled water in irrigation works by increasing usage from 90,000 cubic meters per
day to more than 1 million cubic meters per day through the construction of a new recycled water network.
Al-Mana said the Green Riyadh project will also reduce carbon dioxide and impurity levels in the city.
“Based on experience, roads and streets without trees contain eight to 10 times the amount of dust compared with streets lined with trees on both sides,” he said.