Naseef optimistic about Rabita trust reactivation

Updated 23 March 2014

Naseef optimistic about Rabita trust reactivation

The Jeddah-based Pakistan Repatriation Council (PRC) held an event to mark the 74th anniversary of the Pakistan resolution adopted in March 1940 in Lahore. The event was presided over by Hilal-e-Pakistan recipient and former Muslim World League chief Dr. Abdullah Omar Naseef. Former diplomat Dr. Ali Al-Ghamdi was the chief guest and Saeed Al-Farha was the guest of honor.
Naseef said Pakistan is an important member of the Muslim world, which is facing more issues with the passage of time, and so it is very important to work with unity and strategy and try to solve the issues. He said that Rabita Trust was established in July 1988 with, as signatory, late President Zia-ul Haq and former general secretary (Naseef) and mandate of repatriation and rehabilitation of Pakistanis stranded in Bangladesh. Some work was done by Nawaz Sharif during his tenures in 1993 and 1997. However, it was frozen in 2001 by Pervez Musharraf and all the work stopped.
He said that he is in touch with the present government and hoped that Nawaz Sharif will reactivate the repatriation work. He praised Punjab government for allocating land for building housing units for rehabilitation of repatriated Pakistanis there. If the Rabita Trust reactivation was not possible then Pakistan can establish a commission to organize the repatriation work and in this OIC and MWL should be able to extend support.
Al-Ghamdi said that every Muslim should pray for Pakistan which gives strength to the Ummah. Pakistan was established after great sacrifices of Muslims of the sub-continent. In the 1947 migration from India those who migrated to East Pakistan are still languishing in camps due to creation of Bangladesh in 1971.
He said it is the primary responsibility of Pakistan to pursue action to settle them and in this Bangladesh should also play active role and if some percentage of stranded Pakistanis could settle then Bangladesh should facilitate their settlement with dignity and humanity. Pakistan should approach OIC, MWL to overcome difficulties in solving the issue. He praised the proposal made by PRC in arranging “repatriation and rehabilitation on self-finance basis.”
Saeed Al-Farha, former director, International Civil Aviation Organization, said he has full confidence that Pakistan will soon recover from all crisis under the leadership of Nawaz Sharif. He urged the prime minister to take sincere measures to solve the issue of stranded Pakistanis. He also reminded Pakistanis to learn Arabic.
While thanking the guests, PRC convener, Syed Ehsanul Haque praised Dr. Naseef for supporting the cause which, he said, could be solved during the present regime of Nawaz Sharif.


Riyadh roads turn green as world’s largest urban greening project branches out

Based on experience, roads and streets without trees contain eight to 10 times the amount of dust compared with streets lined with trees on both sides. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 03 August 2020

Riyadh roads turn green as world’s largest urban greening project branches out

  • Capital gets a facelift as Vision 2030 program works to plant 7.5 million trees
  • Most of the tree species used in the project are from a well-developed local environment with low agricultural service and care

RIYADH: The Green Riyadh project, one of the world’s largest urban greening initiatives, is rapidly bearing fruit as it transforms main roads in the capital.

Major thoroughfares, including King Khalid, Makkah and King Salman roads, are getting a facelift as part of the Vision 2030 goal of improving quality of life in the city.
Dr. Fahad Al-Mana, a professor of Ornamental Plants, Gardens and Green Areas at King Saud University, told Arab News that native tree species being used for the project include Ziziphus spina-christi, Acacia gerrardii and Prosopis cineraria, commonly known as the ghaf tree.
According to Al-Mana, the trees can survive in harsh desert conditions and will grow without intensive agricultural care.
“Most of the tree species used in the planting of the Green Riyadh project are from a well-developed local environment with low agricultural service and care,” he said.
Environmental conditions in Riyadh were taken into account during the tree selection process. The species can grow to a large size in only three years.
“In some locations, they have moved large 3-year-old local trees that were taken care of in plant nurseries to new locations where they are growing successfully,” Al-Mana said.
Green Riyadh will increase the amount of greenery in the city and augment the green cover in the Saudi capital with the planting of 7.5 million trees around the city’s main features and facilities.
The project will reduce the average ambient temperature by 2 degrees Celsius and improve air quality, encouraging people to follow a healthier lifestyle by walking or cycling.

FASTFACTS

• The project will reduce the average ambient temperature by 2 degrees Celsius and improve air quality, encouraging people to follow a healthier lifestyle by walking or cycling.

• The project will maximize the use of recycled water in irrigation works by increasing usage from 90,000 cubic meters per day to more than 1 million cubic meters per day through the construction of a new recycled water network.

• Green space in the city will increase from 5 percent to 9 percent by 2030

“The aim of planting trees in the streets is to provide shade and moderate the temperature, especially in summer, which contributes to the purification of air and reduces environmental pollution by protecting the city from sand storms, winds and dust. In addition, it gives an aesthetic view and the element of nature enters the city and nearby structures,” said Al-Mana.
He added that trees, especially those planted in central street islands, must have long trunks and high branches to avoid hindering the movement of pedestrians and cars. The trunk must measure at least 3 to 4 meters and the size of the trees planted must be proportional to the width of the island.
Al-Mana said green space in the city will increase from 5 percent to 9 percent by 2030.
According to the Green Riyadh website, the project will maximize the use of recycled water in irrigation works by increasing usage from 90,000 cubic meters per
day to more than 1 million cubic meters per day through the construction of a new recycled water network.
Al-Mana said the Green Riyadh project will also reduce carbon dioxide and impurity levels in the city.
“Based on experience, roads and streets without trees contain eight to 10 times the amount of dust compared with streets lined with trees on both sides,” he said.