Millennia-old mummy found in Egypt tomb

A sarcophagus containing a millennia-old mummy found near Luxor. (AFP)
Updated 13 November 2016

Millennia-old mummy found in Egypt tomb

CAIRO: Spanish archaeologists have discovered a millennia-old mummy in “very good condition” near the southern Egyptian town of Luxor, the antiquities ministry said on Sunday.
The find was in a tomb probably dating from between 1075-664 BC, on the west bank of the Nile river 700 km south of Cairo, a statement said. The mummy had been bound with linen stuck together with plaster. It was in a brightly colored wooden sarcophagus and had been buried near a temple from the era of fourth-millennium warrior king Thutmose III.
The tomb was likely to have belonged to a nobleman, Amenrenef, who was “a servant of the royal household,” the ministry said. The archaeological team’s head, Myriam Seco Alvarez, said the mummy was decorated with “many colorful decorations recalling religious symbols from ancient Egypt ...” The earliest evidence of mummification in Egypt suggests that the practice of wrapping bodies to preserve them after death dates back as far as 4500 BC.


TWITTER POLL: Majority believes Hezbollah will be convicted of 2005 Hariri assassination

Updated 13 August 2020

TWITTER POLL: Majority believes Hezbollah will be convicted of 2005 Hariri assassination

DUBAI: A special UN-backed tribunal is set to announce its verdict on the 2005 murder of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafic Hariri on Aug. 18 – and an Arab News Twitter poll showed majority thinks Hezbollah will be convicted.

Four alleged members of the Shiite group are on trial for the Beirut suicide bombing in 2005 that killed Hariri.

Arab News asked on Twitter whether the tribunal will convict the four, and out of 725 respondents, 64.6 percent said yes. The defendants will face life imprisonment if convicted.

The Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) was going to announce the verdict on Friday, but had to postpone because of the deadly explosion at the Beirut port.

The court “is deeply saddened and shocked by the tragic events that shook Lebanon” and “expresses its solidarity with the Lebanese people in these difficult times,” it said in a statement announcing the ruling’s postponement.

STL is believed to be the first international tribunal set up to probe terrorist crimes.