Saudi Arabia to invest $30-50bn in renewable energy by 2023

Saudi Arabia to invest $30-50bn in renewable energy by 2023
Saudi Minister of Energy, Industrial and Mineral Resources Khalid Al-Falih, speaks during the 10th edition of the World Future Energy Summit on Monday in the United Arab Emirates capital Abu Dhabi. (AFP)
Updated 15 March 2017

Saudi Arabia to invest $30-50bn in renewable energy by 2023

Saudi Arabia to invest $30-50bn in renewable energy by 2023

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia is launching a renewable energy program in the next few weeks that is expected to invest $30-$50 billion by 2023, Energy, Industry and Mineral Recourses Minister Khalid Al-Falih announced Monday.
Al-Falih said at the World Future Energy Summit in Abu Dhabi that the Kingdom would start the first round of bidding for projects under the program, which would produce 10GW of power.
He also said that Saudi Arabia is in the early stages of studying its first two commercial nuclear reactors with a total of 2.8GW. Al-Falih told Reuters that, “there will be significant investment in nuclear energy.”
The minister also said Saudi Arabia was working on ways to connect its renewable energy projects with Yemen, Jordan and Egypt.
“We will connect to Africa to exchange non-fossil sources of energy,” he said.
The step falls into the country’s targets set in Vision 2030, launched last year to prepare for a post-oil era following a plunge in oil prices. Saudi Arabia, the world’s largest oil exporter, plans to reduce its reliance on oil and diversify the economy by moving toward sustainable sources rather than depending on fossil oil.
Renewable energy is listed among the sectors to be launched, as the Vision reads: “In the manufacturing sector, we will work toward localizing renewable energy and industrial equipment sectors.”
John Sfakianakis, director of economic research at the Riyadh-based Gulf Research Center, told Arab News that Saudi Arabia has a “considerable solar power potential” that can reduce its reliance on fossil fuels.
“Saudi Arabia wants to balance economic needs against environmental goals as it has considerable solar power potential and is eager to reduce its use of fossil fuels,” Sfakianakis said. “The country ranks high in per capita greenhouse gas CO2 emissions.”
Achieving the ambitious renewable energy program by 2023 needs time, technical knowledge and capacity, and above all coordination between various stakeholders, according to energy expert Mohamed Ramady.
“The fact that there are many stakeholders in Saudi Arabia involved in the renewable energy program, such as KACST, KACARE, KAPSARC and KAUST among others ensures some duplication of effort and above all lack of specific focus for renewables,” said Ramady, a former professor at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals.
He told Arab News that whether the focus would be on solar or nuclear energy would determine the policy and would lead to different paths and options in terms of domestic and international cooperation.
“If nuclear energy option is the preferred option, then Saudi Arabia has to assess whether current leaders using such energy like France, South Korea and Finland are still committed to this renewable energy source in the long term and whether their technology transfer and nuclear waste programs can be safely transferred,” Ramady said.
Achieving a viable large-scale renewable energy application is not as easy as it sounds, according to Ramady.
“The United Arab Emirates’ (UAE) MASDAR renewable energy model city initiative was a path breaker with mixed success, but from which valuable lessons can be learned by Saudi Arabia,” he said. “However, in the meantime starting off by installing smart electricity household meters coupled with incentives to save energy could help to reduce pressure on the government in the face of potential lower oil prices and revenues.”
The Riyadh-based King Abdullah City for Atomic and Renewable Energy (KACARE) stated that hydrocarbons would remain a prime element in the energy mix in 2023, by an estimation of 60GW. This will also be supported with nuclear energy at 17.6GW, solar at 41GW, of which 16GW will be generated through the use of photovoltaic cells and the balance of 25GW by concentrated solar power, wind at 9GW, waste-to-energy at 3GW and geothermal at 1GW.
Renewable energy is increasingly becoming a new sector in the country and is expected to expand until the new renewable energy program can reach its target by 2023.
“By creating an entirely new sector for the economy, jobs will be generated as it moves into more advanced areas of the production chain. Job creation for Saudis and a cleaner environment are important goals of Vision 2030 for better quality of life values,” said Sfakianakis.
According to the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) report on renewable energy market analysis in the Gulf Council Countries (GCC) region, Saudi Arabia is the world’s seventh largest oil consumer. Domestic consumption of oil witnessed a surge in the 2000s rising from 17 percent in 2000 to 28 percent in 2014. The report, published in 2016, estimated that achieving the GCC renewable energy targets could create an average of 140,000 direct jobs per year.


Global interest in clean hydrogen surges as Mideast works to boost supply

Global interest in clean hydrogen surges as Mideast works to boost supply
Updated 44 sec ago

Global interest in clean hydrogen surges as Mideast works to boost supply

Global interest in clean hydrogen surges as Mideast works to boost supply
DUBAI: Interest in clean hydrogen is rising across the globe, as countries explore ways to decarbonize, a new World Energy Council report showed.

Estimates revealed that hydrogen could account for six to 25 percent of global energy consumption by 2050, according to the publication titled Hydrogen on the Horizon: ready, almost set, go?.

Different regions play a role in the current hydrogen energy transition, the report said, with countries in the Middle East and North Africa focusing on the supply side.

Saudi Arabia, in July, unveiled plans for a $5 billion green hydrogen facility – the world’s largest such project at the time. Other Middle East countries, including the UAE, Oman and Egypt have also announced major projects to exploit the expected demand.

An earlier report by Dii Desert Energy and Roland Berger said the Gulf region alone could create a $200 billion green hydrogen industry by 2050.

The region also benefits from its strategic geographic location being between the European and Asian markets, which the World Energy Council report described as demand-focused markets.

Different countries also have different ideas of how to utilize clean hydrogen, the report said.

Asia shows a greater focus on hydrogen as a liquid fuel in the form of ammonia, and as a fuel for shipping and road transport, while Europe wants to use hydrogen to decarbonize hard-to-abate sectors such as heavy industries and mass transportation.

“How countries want to produce and consume clean energy, and their immediate national priorities, will shape large-scale hydrogen development and end-user uptake,” Angela Wilkinson, Secretary General and CEO of the World Energy Council said.

It is important to identify user priorities to “better understand hydrogen’s real potential,” she said.

Jeroen van Hoof, global energy, utilities, and resources leader at PwC said this decade is crucial to develop hydrogen projects – including infrastructure to produce, import, distribute and use hydrogen at a large scale.

“If we do this successfully over the next few years, it can pave the way for hydrogen demand to grow exponentially beyond 2030,” he added.

But the report identified several challenges in this global endeavor, including concerns on the cost of low-carbon hydrogen, which is still more expensive than other energy sources.

The report said countries need to collaborate to create a global value chain and unlock the potential of hydrogen for the global economy.

Global markets regulators team up to keep watch on SPACs

Global markets regulators team up to keep watch on SPACs
Updated 27 July 2021

Global markets regulators team up to keep watch on SPACs

Global markets regulators team up to keep watch on SPACs
  • SPACS may raise regulatory concerns, said the International Organization of Securities Commissions

LONDON: Global securities markets regulators said on Tuesday they have begun monitoring special purpose acquisition companies, or SPACs, due to potential regulatory concerns.
SPACs are shell companies that list themselves on the stock market and use the proceeds to buy other companies.
It is a form of investment that soared last year on Wall Street, gathered steam in Europe this year and is now spreading into emerging markets.
“While SPACs may offer alternative sources of funding and provide opportunities for investors, they may also raise regulatory concerns,” the International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) said in a statement.
IOSCO, whose members include the US Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC), the Financial Conduct Authority in Britain and regulators in the European Union, Asia, Latin America and Africa, said its new SPAC network met for the first time on Monday to share information.
“I am pleased that so many members of IOSCO have joined the SPACs network to exchange experiences on non-traditional IPOs via SPACs and discuss emerging issues related to investor protection and fair, orderly and efficient markets,” said Jean-Paul Servais, chairman of Belgium’s markets watchdog and Vice-Chair of IOSCO’s board.
The markets watchdogs which are members of IOSCO have the power to take action to protect investors in their jurisdictions.


Saudi Arabia suspends desalination and power plant privatization amid strategy review

Saudi Arabia suspends desalination and power plant privatization amid strategy review
Updated 27 July 2021

Saudi Arabia suspends desalination and power plant privatization amid strategy review

Saudi Arabia suspends desalination and power plant privatization amid strategy review
  • New strategy for Saline Water Conversion Corporation to be announced soon

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia has suspended the privatization of Ras Al Khair Desalination and Power Plant as it reviews its strategy.
This decision was made to capitalize on knowledge and capacity built in the Kingdom as a result of many years of experience in the areas of water desalination, new technologies, R&D and supply chains, the Privatization Supervisory Committee for the Environment, Water and Agriculture said in a statement on Monday.
A new engagement strategy and plan for the Saline Water Conversion Corporation (SWCC) assets such as Ras Al Khair plant will be announced shortly.
“It is either that the outcome was not aligned with the government spending efficiency goals or it’s not a top priority for the time being, as there is price control on water services in the country that doesn’t allow room for enough profits to the private operators, that the government may need to offer significant subsidies to make the PPP project attractive to the private sector, ” Razeen Capital CEO Mohamed Alsuwayed told Arab News.
The Privatization Committee said it will continue to engage investors in future PPP and privatization transactions in the water sector, and new greenfield investment opportunities will be launched in due course.
Saline Water Conversion Corporation (SWCC) invited seven pre-qualified companies and strategic alliances to submit their bids (RFP) to participate in the Ras Al-Khair desalination and power plant’s privatization process, last January.
SWCC said in a statement that the winning consortium will own 60 percent of the project company, and will handle management, operation, and maintenance works. For now, SWCC will continue to manage it, according to the statement.


Kuwait loosens COVID restrictions for vaccinated, allows some direct flights

Kuwait loosens COVID restrictions for vaccinated, allows some direct flights
Updated 27 July 2021

Kuwait loosens COVID restrictions for vaccinated, allows some direct flights

Kuwait loosens COVID restrictions for vaccinated, allows some direct flights
  • 8 pm commercial curfew to end today
  • Unvaccinated only allowed to food markets, pharmacies, co-ops

KUWAIT CITY: The Kuwaiti cabinet cancelled its decision to close commercial activities at 8 pm, starting Tuesday, the state news agency KUNA reported on Monday.
All activities will be allowed except for large gatherings, such as conferences, weddings, and social events, starting from Sept. 1. Special activities for children will also be allowed.
Kuwait will allow only those who are vaccinated to take part in all activities, while the unvaccinated will be only allowed to pharmacies, consumer cooperative societies, and food and catering marketing outlets, starting from Aug. 1, the cabinet added.
Kuwait will also allow direct flights to Morocco and Maldives starting Aug. 1, the cabinet said in a statement.


Gulf rebound set as Saudi Arabia, UAE seen topping 4% growth in 2022 - Reuters poll

Gulf rebound set as Saudi Arabia, UAE seen topping 4% growth in 2022 - Reuters poll
Updated 27 July 2021

Gulf rebound set as Saudi Arabia, UAE seen topping 4% growth in 2022 - Reuters poll

Gulf rebound set as Saudi Arabia, UAE seen topping 4% growth in 2022 - Reuters poll
  • Saudi 2022 growth seen at 4.3 percent, 2023 at 3.3 percent
  • UAE expected to grow 4.2 percent next year and 3.4 percent in 2023

RIYADH: The six economies in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) are set to rebound and grow 2 percent to nearly 3 percent this year while the region’s two largest economies, Saudi Arabia and the UAE, are forecast to grow over 4 percent next year, a quarterly Reuters survey showed.
That outlook follows steep declines last year following an oil price crash and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, while analysts expected Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Kuwait to benefit from an OPEC+ deal to boost oil production.
“Our core assumption was that a longer-term deal would be secured, and we raise our 2022 forecasts on the back of the baseline adjustments, which will enable the UAE, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia to raise oil output and their global market share from May 2022,” said Monica Malik, chief economist at Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank.
Medians in the July 5-26 poll pegged Saudi Arabia’s growth at 2.3 percent this year, down slightly from a forecast of 2.4 percent in a similar poll three months ago.
In 2022, the Middle East’s largest economy and world’s largest oil exporter’s gross domestic product was seen growing 4.3 percent, an upward revision of 100 basis points (bps). Growth for 2023 was revised up 30 bps to 3.3 percent.
The UAE was expected to grow 2.3 percent this year, unchanged, and 4.2 percent next year and 3.4 percent in 2023, revised up 60 bps and 10 bps respectively.
Expectations for Kuwait’s 2021 GDP growth were lifted 60 bps to 2.4 percent, while growth next year was boosted 110 bps to 4.6 percent. Growth was seen 10 bps higher in 2023 at 3.0 percent.
Qatar’s 2021 growth forecast was scaled back 30 bps to 2.5 percent. The expectation for growth next year was unchanged at 3.6 percent and down 40 bps to 2.7 percent for 2023.
Oman was revised up 20 bps to 2.1 percent expected growth this year, up 10 bps to 3.3 percent next year and down 20 bps in 2023 to 2.2 percent. Bahrain’s outlook was unchanged for this year and next at 2.9 percent, while 2023 growth was seen 30 bps lower at 2.4 percent.
At least half of the GCC’s state revenues come from hydrocarbons, and diversification away from that will “likely take many years to achieve,” with fiscal diversification likely to follow with additional lag, Moody’s said in a report last month.
“The announced plans to boost hydrocarbon production capacity and government commitments to zero or very low taxes make it unlikely that this reliance will diminish significantly in the coming years, even with some progress in economic diversification, which we expect.”