US sues Oracle for discrimination in pay and hiring practice

This June 18, 2012, file photo shows Oracle headquarters in Redwood City, California. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
Updated 19 January 2017

US sues Oracle for discrimination in pay and hiring practice

SAN FRANCISCO, United States: The US Labor Department on Wednesday sued business software giant Oracle alleging “systemic” discrimination in pay against female, African American and Asian employees.
The administrative lawsuit also challenges Oracle’s practice of “favoring Asian workers in its recruiting and hiring practices” for key technical jobs, saying it discriminates against non-Asian applicants.
The lawsuit is the result of an investigation begun in 2014 by the US agency’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, and could result in the loss of “millions” in US government contracts for Oracle, according to statement.
“Federal contractors are required to comply with all applicable anti-discrimination laws,” said Thomas Dowd, acting director of the office.
“We filed this lawsuit to enforce those requirements.”
The agency said Oracle refused to comply with the “routine requests for employment data and records,” and that officials “attempted for almost a year to resolve Oracle’s alleged discrimination violations before filing the suit.”
California-based Oracle, one of the largest firms in Silicon Valley, said in a statement that the complaint “is politically motivated, based on false allegations, and wholly without merit.”
The company said: “Oracle values diversity and inclusion, and is a responsible equal opportunity and affirmative action employer. Our hiring and pay decisions are non-discriminatory and made based on legitimate business factors including experience and merit.”
The nine-page complaint said Oracle paid white makes more than their counterparts in the same job title.
It also said Oracle, which has some 45,000 employees in the United States and is known for its cloud computing and business applications, used a recruiting and hiring process which favored Asians, especially Indians, resulting in discrimination against African-American, Hispanic and white job applicants.


Minneapolis braces for more riots, arson following police killing of Afro-American George Floyd

Updated 30 May 2020

Minneapolis braces for more riots, arson following police killing of Afro-American George Floyd

CHICAGO: Minneapolis exploded into riots and arson this week after an African-American suspected of handling counterfeit money was killed on Monday during his arrest by two city police officers.

Videos on social media showed an officer placing his knee on George Floyd’s neck as he was handcuffed and being restrained on the street by the kerb. The 46-year-old said that he could not breathe, but police insisted that Floyd was “resisting arrest” and had to be forcibly restrained.

The officer who was seen kneeling on Floyd’s neck was arrested on Friday and charged with murder.

Floyd was pronounced dead at the scene and his family immediately called for an independent probe.

His family turned to civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump, who said the family’s first concern was to seek an autopsy independent of the police because of a lack of trust in law enforcement and to give their deceased family member a proper funeral.

“Is it two justice systems in America?” Crump said as he addressed the media. “One for black America and one for white America? We can’t have that. We have to have equal justice for the United States of America and that’s what I think the protesters are crying out for.”

Protests spread across the country and turned violent as arson destroyed property, including the police station where the police officers were assigned.

President Donald Trump denounced the rioters as “thugs” and warned that he might send in the military “to take control.” 

Minneapolis Police handed the investigation into Floyd’s death to the FBI and US Justice Department on Thursday night. Officials from the FBI and US Justice Department promised that the probe would be “robust and meticulous.”

The media’s role in the protests came sharply into focus when, early on Friday, CNN’s Omar Jimenez was arrested along with his TV crew.

CNN anchor Alisyn Camerota, who looked on as her colleague was being arrested, told viewers: “If you are just tuning in you are watching our correspondent Omar Jimenez being arrested by state police in Minnesota. We are not sure why our correspondent is being arrested.”