Shoppers share surreal snaps of Dubai Mall in 90-minute blackout

The Dubai Mall was plunged into darkness Monday night. (Photo courtesy: Twitter)
Updated 25 April 2017

Shoppers share surreal snaps of Dubai Mall in 90-minute blackout

DUBAI: The world’s largest mall was plunged into darkness Monday night as a power outage led to stores closing and Dubai Police personnel descending on the scene while shoppers shared photos and videos of the incident.
The power outage hit The Dubai Mall at 7.13 p.m. and saw cash tills, escalators and all power-driven machinery come to a halt leading more than 1,000 commercial outlets to ask shoppers to leave.
Shoppers navigated their way through the mall using their phone lights and the back-up generators kicked in to keep the elevators, emergency exit doors and some back-up lights working, Gulf News reported.
The newspaper reported that security staff cordoned off one of the entrances to the mall but added that the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa, was not affected.
Power was restored at 8.47pm.
In a released statement, the mall’s utility service provider said: “Dubai Electricity and Water Authority’s (Dewa) technicians successfully restored power to Dubai Mall tonight after a power outage that was caused by the transfer of high-voltage cables from Dubai Mall substation, based on a request from Emaar.
“Dewa and Emaar had previously agreed to transfer the cables. During the transfer, the outage occurred because one line went out of service. Dewa’s technicians fully restored power very quickly. The electricity and water supply to the rest of the area was not affected.

“Dewa would like to thank everyone who worked on the matter, especially Dubai Police, Dubai Civil Defense, Dubai Ambulance Corporation and The Media Office, as well as Dewa’s working teams, the Mall management and staff, and retail outlet owners.”
In a statement, a mall spokesperson said: “Power has been restored in The Dubai Mall and all operations have resumed. We regret the inconvenience caused to our visitors and thank them for their patience.”
Many shoppers took to social media to share images of the surreal experience at one of the city’s busiest malls.


Hawaii thieves cart off $1,000 worth of durian

Updated 17 February 2020

Hawaii thieves cart off $1,000 worth of durian

  • Durian is known for a pale yellow flesh with a sweet taste but a smell described as worse
  • Popular across Southeast Asia but commonly banned from hotel rooms and public transportation there

HONOLULU: Police in Hawaii are investigating the theft of fruit valued at about $1,000 including durian, which is known for its powerful odor.
Two men entered a property in Hilo on the Big Island and removed 18 durian and other types of fruit on the night of Feb. 1, the Hawaii Police Department said.
Authorities released a surveillance camera image of two suspects and asked the public for additional information that could lead to the capture of the fruit bandits.

Authorities released a surveillance image of two suspects involved in a fruit theft in Hilo. (Hawaii Police Department)


The tropical, spiky durian fruit resembles a small porcupine and typically weighs from 2 to 7 pounds (1 to 3 kilograms).
Durian is known for a pale yellow flesh with a sweet taste but a smell that has been compared to moldy cheese, rotten onions, dead fish and far worse.
Durian is popular across Southeast Asia but also is commonly banned from hotel rooms and public transportation there.
The smell of rotting durian in a cupboard was mistaken for a gas leak and prompted an evacuation of a library at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia in April 2018.