Classy and conservative: US First Lady Melania Trump praised for ‘elegantly respectful’ KSA look

US President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive aboard Air Force One at King Khalid International Airport in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia May 20, 2017. (Reuters)
Updated 21 May 2017

Classy and conservative: US First Lady Melania Trump praised for ‘elegantly respectful’ KSA look

JEDDAH: The first lady’s decision to visit Saudi Arabia without a wearing a head covering prompted headlines across the globe on Saturday — but many in the Kingdom took to social media to comment on her classy and conservative look.
Melania Trump landed in the Saudi capital of Riyadh wearing a Stella McCartney jumpsuit adorned with a statement belt, which was the most eye-catching feature of the all-black overall.
The stretch cady jumpsuit — with wide-leg silhouette, keyhole cut-out at the bust, and cuffed sleeves — caught the attention of many international media outlets and was admired by Saudis who appreciated the modest, yet classy look of the first lady.
“Melania Trump before leaving the United States vs. Melania while landing in Saudi Arabia. Respect for the country’s traditions,” one Twitter user said with a thumbs-up. “Not only modest, but elegant at the same time.”
The loose outfit almost resembled the traditional black abaya — a loose over-garment, essentially a robe-like dress — worn by Saudi women.
The simple black look was decorated with a chunky, chain-link necklace and statement metallic python waist belt from Saint Laurent.
Saudi women already began posting images of themselves wearing “Melania-style” abayas. Jeddah-based Nahed Andijani, owner of Trendy Sketch PR, shared a picture of her abaya, which looks almost the same — all black with a golden rose in the middle.
“When I saw her arrival pictures wearing a modest outfit respecting our culture, I was like ‘this looks so much like my abaya!’ ” Andijani told Arab News. “She wore a golden belt, while I wore a golden rose but still look so much alike.”
Andijani expressed her excitement that she shares the same fashion taste, as the first lady has “a very high sense of fashion.”


Australian man survives croc attack by gouging its eye

Updated 16 November 2019

Australian man survives croc attack by gouging its eye

  • Wildlife ranger Craig Dickmann made a split-second decision to go fishing in a remote part of Northern Australia known as ‘croc country.’
  • ‘That noise will haunt me forever I think, the sound of the snap of its jaws’

CAIRNS, Australia: An Australian wildlife ranger has recounted his terrifying escape from the clutches of a “particularly cunning” crocodile, after wrestling with the reptile and sticking a finger in its eye.
Craig Dickmann, who made a split-second decision to go fishing last Sunday in a remote part of Northern Australia known as “croc country” last Sunday, said a 2.8-meter (nine-foot) crocodile came up from behind him as he was leaving the beach.
“As I’ve turned to go, the first thing I see is its head just come at me,” he told reporters on Friday from his hospital bed in the town of Cairns in Queensland state.
Dickmann said the animal latched on to his thigh.
“That noise will haunt me forever I think, the sound of the snap of its jaws,” he said.
The 54-year-old said he wrestled with the croc on the remote beach as it tried to drag him into the water.
Dickmann stuck his thumb into its eye, saying it was the only “soft spot” he found on the “bullet-proof” animal.
“Their eyes retract a fair way and when you go down far enough you can feel bone so I pushed as far as I possibly could and then it let go at that point,” Dickmann said.
After a few minutes, he said he managed to get on top of the croc and pin its jaws shut.
“And then, I think both the croc and I had a moment where we’re going, ‘well, what do we do now?’”
Dickmann said he then pushed the croc away from him and it slid back into the water.
The ranger had skin ripped from his hands and legs in the ordeal and drove more than 45 minutes back to his home before calling emergency services.
It was then another hour in the car to meet the Royal Flying Doctors Service who flew him to Cairns Hospital, where he is recovering from the ordeal.
“This croc was particularly cunning and particularly devious,” he said.
Queensland’s department of environment this week euthanized the animal.
“The area is known croc country and people in the area are reminded to always be crocwise,” the department said in a statement.
Saltwater crocodiles, which can grow up to seven meters long and weigh more than a ton, are common in the vast continent’s tropical north.
Their numbers have exploded since they were declared a protected species in the 1970s, with attacks on humans rare.
According to the state government, the last non-fatal attack was in January 2018 in the Torres Strait while the last death was in October 2017 in Port Douglas.