Storms disrupt Beijing flights, authorities warn of flash flooding, landslides

Vehicles are trapped on a flooded street during a heavy rainfall in Beijing July 20, 2016. (File pgoto by Reuters)
Updated 12 August 2017

Storms disrupt Beijing flights, authorities warn of flash flooding, landslides

BEIJING: Thunderstorms lashed Beijing on Saturday, disrupting hundreds of flights at one of the world’s largest airports, while authorities warned that rain and wind could cause landslides in the area where a 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck this week.
Beijing city authorities raised their weather alert level early on Saturday afternoon to “orange” from “yellow,” warning that lightning, hail, wind and as much as 70 mm of rain would hit the city, potentially causing flash floods in mountainous areas.
Beijing Capital International Airport Co. Ltd. <0694.HK urged travelers, in a statement on its website, to check for updates on their flights into and out of the city.
Almost 500 flights were listed as canceled from 9 a.m. until midnight and 182 were delayed at China’s busiest airport, the website showed.
Air China Ltd. said on its Weibo social media account that some 137 of its flights in and out of the capital had been canceled as of 11 a.m. (0300 GMT).
Torrential rain storms are fairly frequent in Beijing in the summer months, often causing long delays at the airport.
Other airports affected by the downpours included Shanghai, Nanjing in Jiangsu province, Hangzhou in Zhejiang along the Yangtze River delta.
The others were in northern regions: Shijiazhuang in Hebei, Taiyuan in Shanxi, Lanzhou in Gansu, Xining in Qinghai and Yinchuan in Ningxia.
In a statement, China’s National Meteorological Center cautioned rescue crews working in Jiuzhaigou, in the southwestern province of Sichuan, to be on alert for landslides and lightning.
Heavy rain was expected across south-eastern China on Saturday, it said.
The extreme weather came after a tornado struck Inner Mongolia on Friday, killing five people, injuring more than 50 and destroying homes in a major city.


Trump says Baghdadi successor in US crosshairs

Updated 4 min 16 sec ago

Trump says Baghdadi successor in US crosshairs

  • The US president used his speech in New York to claim that Daesh’s leadership was running scared in the wake of Baghdadi’s death
  • Donald Trump: Thanks to American warriors, Al-Baghdadi is dead, his second in charge is dead, we have our eyes on number three

NEW YORK: US President Donald Trump placed the Daesh group’s new chief in the crosshairs Monday as he marked Veterans’ Day by celebrating the killing of the extremists’ former leader Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi.

While US presidents traditionally mark the day by laying a wreath at a vast military cemetery in Arlington, near Washington, Trump traveled to New York where he made an address ahead of the city’s annual parade of veterans.

Trump was widely criticized after announcing a full withdrawal of US troops from Syria last month, with opponents and even some allies saying it could allow Daesh to rebuild as well as leaving US-allied Kurdish fighters vulnerable to a Turkish invasion.

But the US president used his speech in New York to claim that Daesh’s leadership was running scared in the wake of Baghdadi’s death in a raid in the northwestern Syrian province of Idlib on October 26.

“Just a few weeks ago, American special forces raided the Daesh compound and brought the world’s number one terrorist leader to justice,” he said.

“Thanks to American warriors, Al-Baghdadi is dead, his second in charge is dead, we have our eyes on number three.

“His reign of terror is over, and we have our enemies running very, very scared. Those who threaten our people don’t stand a chance against the righteous might of the American military.”

After the death of Baghdadi and Daesh’s main spokesman, Abu Hassan Al-MuHajjir, in a raid the following day, the organization named the little known Abu Ibrahim Al-Hashimi Al-Quraishi as its new leader.

Following the uproar over his announcement of a full troop withdrawal, Trump said that he would leave some troops in the region to protect valuable oil fields.

General Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said in an interview at the weekend that US troop levels in northern Syria would probably stabilize at around 500.