Mascot designs for 2020 Tokyo Olympics shortlisted

1 / 4
Schoolchildren pose with a shortlist of three pairs of official Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games mascots during a photo session at Kakezuka elementary school in Tokyo December 2017. Tokyo Olympic organizers unveiled a shortlist of three official 2020 Games mascots Dec. 7 — from bug-eyed cartoon heroes to cuddly raccoons. (AFP/Kazuhiro Nogi)
2 / 4
Schoolchildren pose beside a pair of official Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games mascots, one of three shortlisted pairs to be unveiled, at Kakezuka elementary school in Tokyo on December 2017. Tokyo Olympic organizers unveiled a shortlist of three official 2020 Games mascots Dec. 7 — from bug-eyed cartoon heroes to cuddly raccoons. (AFP/Kazuhiro Nogi)
3 / 4
Schoolchildren pose beside a pair of official Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games mascots, one of three shortlisted pairs to be unveiled, at Kakezuka elementary school in Tokyo on December 2017. Tokyo Olympic organizers unveiled a shortlist of three official 2020 Games mascots Dec. 7 — from bug-eyed cartoon heroes to cuddly raccoons. (AFP/Kazuhiro Nogi)
4 / 4
Schoolchildren pose beside a pair of official Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games mascots, one of three shortlisted pairs to be unveiled, at Kakezuka elementary school in Tokyo on December 2017. Tokyo Olympic organizers unveiled a shortlist of three official 2020 Games mascots Dec. 7 — from bug-eyed cartoon heroes to cuddly raccoons. (AFP/Kazuhiro Nogi)
Updated 07 December 2017

Mascot designs for 2020 Tokyo Olympics shortlisted

TOKYO: Japanese schoolchildren will help determine the mascot for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.
Organizers of the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics on Thursday unveiled three sets of designs for the games’ mascots. The 6.5 million schoolchildren will review the shortlisted designs with their classes casting a single vote in favor of one of the three sets.
The three finalists were selected from among 2,042 entries submitted by the public, with the winner to be announced on Feb. 28.
The first set is a pair of humanoid characters clad in the ‘ichimatsu” checkered pattern of the Games’ official logo.
The second set features a “maneki neko” (good-luck cat) and a fox commonly seen at Shinto shrines. The third set features a fox and a dog with gold ribbons on their backs.
The Tokyo Olympics are scheduled for July 24 to Aug. 9, 2020.


NBA star LeBron James opts out of wearing social justice message on Lakers jersey

Updated 12 July 2020

NBA star LeBron James opts out of wearing social justice message on Lakers jersey

  • ‘It is just something that didn’t seriously resonate with my mission, with my goal’
  • But Lakers star still working behind the scenes to improve the lives of others

LOS ANGELES: NBA superstar LeBron James said Saturday he would opt out of wearing a social justice message on the back of his jersey because it doesn’t “resonate with his mission.”
James, who has often spoken out against racism and police brutality in America, is passing on the NBA’s plan to help bring attention to racial inequality by having players wear messages like “I Can’t Breathe” instead of their family names.
“I didn’t go with a name on the back of my jersey,” the Los Angeles Lakers forward James said Saturday. “It was no disrespect to the list that was handed down to all the players.”
“I commend anyone that decides to put something on the back of their jersey. It is just something that didn’t seriously resonate with my mission, with my goal.”
James says he wishes he had had some input into the jersey change.
“I would have loved to have a say on what would have went on the back of the jersey. I had a couple of things in mind, but I wasn’t part of that process which is OK.”
“I don’t need to have something on the back of the jersey for people to understand my mission and what I’m about and what I am here to do.”
The vast majority of NBA players have decided to pick a social justice message when play resumes in Orlando, Florida.
James is one of just about 17 players out of 285 so far who have opted to continue using their family names on the back of their uniforms.
The list of suggested messages, agreed on by the players union and NBA owners and then made available to players, includes “I Can’t Breathe,” which is what George Floyd said more than 20 times before he died with a white police officer kneeling on his neck.
Other messages include: Black Lives Matter; Say Their Names; Vote; Justice; Peace; Equality; Freedom; Enough; Power to the People; Justice Now; Say Her Name; Sí Se Puede (Yes We Can); Liberation; See Us; Hear Us; Respect Us; Love Us; Listen; Listen to Us; Stand Up; Ally; Anti-Racist; I Am A Man; Speak Up; How Many More; Group Economics; Education Reform; and Mentor.
James said even though he isn’t taking part in the jersey messages, he is still working behind the scenes to improve the lives of others, especially people in the Black community.
“Being able to use my platform, use the NBA’s platform, to continue to talk about what’s going on. Because I will not stop until I see real change for us in Black America, for African Americans, for people of color. And I also believe I can do both, though.”
James said he always expected to play in the restart to the season: “I am here for one goal and one goal only and that is to win a championship.”