Pyeongchang or Pyongyang? Twitter users place Olympics in North Korea

The Olympic torch is carried into the stadium during the opening ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Friday, Feb. 9, 2018. (AP)
Updated 11 February 2018
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Pyeongchang or Pyongyang? Twitter users place Olympics in North Korea

PYEONGCHANG: South Koreans angry at North Korea’s perceived “hijacking” of the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics have sarcastically dubbed it the “Pyongyang Games,” but it seems many really are struggling to differentiate between the two places.
Hundreds of Twitter users in recent days have referred to “Pyongyang2018,” and while some were making a dig at the presence of North Korea at the Games, in many cases it appears to have been a simple mix-up.
The two are easily confused, but there is a world of difference between them: Pyongyang is the capital of nuclear-armed North Korea, while Pyeongchang is the South Korean region hosting the Winter Olympics.
The number of mentions of “Pyongyang2018” spiked during Friday’s opening ceremony, when hosts South Korea and the North — two countries technically still at war — marched together behind the Korean unification flag.
The growing number of apparently unintentional references to Pyongyang irked at least one Twitter user in Washington, DC, who tweeted: “The number of people mistakenly using #Pyongyang2018 to tweet about #PyeongChang2018 is not that surprising but nevertheless upsetting.”
It isn’t the first time Pyeongchang has been confused with Pyongyang. The gold medal for mix-ups goes to the Kenyan delegate to a UN conference held in Pyeongchang in 2014, who mistakenly flew to Pyongyang instead.
Landing without a valid visa, he was interrogated for five hours by North Korean customs officials and fined $500.
Eager to differentiate, provincial authorities have since re-branded the South Korean ski resort as “PyeongChang,” using an upper-case “C.”


Huawei CFO’s arrest at airport to be focus of Vancouver hearing

Huawei Technologies Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou is escorted b y security as she leaves her home on May 8, 2019 in Vancouver. (File/AFP)
Updated 23 September 2019

Huawei CFO’s arrest at airport to be focus of Vancouver hearing

  • The arrest has strained China’s relations with both the United States and Canada
  • Meng’s lawyers argue she was unlawfully detained, searched and questioned for over three hours

VANCOUVER, Canada: Lawyers for Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou will be in a Canadian courtroom on Monday to press for details surrounding her arrest at Vancouver’s airport nearly 10 months ago.

Meng, 47, was detained on Dec. 1 at the request of the United States, where she is charged with bank fraud and accused of misleading HSBC Holdings Plc about Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd’s business in Iran. Meng, who is expected in court, has said she is innocent and is fighting extradition.

The arrest has strained China’s relations with both the United States and Canada. At Monday’s 10 a.m. (1700 GMT) hearing before Justice Heather Holmes of the British Columbia Supreme Court, Meng’s defense team will request more disclosure surrounding her detention at the airport, including contacts between US and Canadian authorities.

Meng’s lawyers argue she was unlawfully detained, searched and questioned for over three hours after she landed on a flight from Hong Kong. Under the ruse of an immigration check, the defense claims, Canadian officials delayed her arrest and collected evidence for US authorities.

Extradition proceedings against Meng should be halted if officials abused the process, the lawyers say. Besides accusations of misconduct related to her detention, they argue the United States is using Meng for economic and political gain, noting that after her arrest, US President Donald Trump said he would intervene if it would help close a trade deal.

Lawyers for Canada will respond to the demand for more information about Meng’s arrest in court, according to a Canadian Department of Justice spokesman, who added that Meng had already been provided with “extensive disclosure, beyond what is required.”

Canadian police and border officers, in response to a civil claim Meng filed earlier this year, have said they acted “lawfully and in good faith.”

Vancouver lawyer Gary Botting, who has seen a video of Meng being detained at the airport, said immigration officials came across as “Keystone Cops.”

“There are real questions about whether her rights were violated,” said Botting, who briefed Meng’s defense team on Canada’s extradition law after her arrest but is no longer involved with the case.
The extradition hearing itself is not scheduled to start until January.

Meng, the daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei, spent 10 days in jail in December but was then released on C$10 million ($7.5 million) bail and is living in one of her two multimillion-dollar homes in Vancouver. She is required to wear an electronic ankle bracelet and pay for security guards.

Huawei, the world’s largest telecommunications equipment maker, has been accused by the United States of activities contrary to national security or foreign policy interests.
US and Chinese officials resumed trade talks last week, as the world’s two largest economies try to negotiate a way out of their 14-month trade war.