Pyeongchang or Pyongyang? Twitter users place Olympics in North Korea

The Olympic torch is carried into the stadium during the opening ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Friday, Feb. 9, 2018. (AP)
Updated 11 February 2018

Pyeongchang or Pyongyang? Twitter users place Olympics in North Korea

PYEONGCHANG: South Koreans angry at North Korea’s perceived “hijacking” of the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics have sarcastically dubbed it the “Pyongyang Games,” but it seems many really are struggling to differentiate between the two places.
Hundreds of Twitter users in recent days have referred to “Pyongyang2018,” and while some were making a dig at the presence of North Korea at the Games, in many cases it appears to have been a simple mix-up.
The two are easily confused, but there is a world of difference between them: Pyongyang is the capital of nuclear-armed North Korea, while Pyeongchang is the South Korean region hosting the Winter Olympics.
The number of mentions of “Pyongyang2018” spiked during Friday’s opening ceremony, when hosts South Korea and the North — two countries technically still at war — marched together behind the Korean unification flag.
The growing number of apparently unintentional references to Pyongyang irked at least one Twitter user in Washington, DC, who tweeted: “The number of people mistakenly using #Pyongyang2018 to tweet about #PyeongChang2018 is not that surprising but nevertheless upsetting.”
It isn’t the first time Pyeongchang has been confused with Pyongyang. The gold medal for mix-ups goes to the Kenyan delegate to a UN conference held in Pyeongchang in 2014, who mistakenly flew to Pyongyang instead.
Landing without a valid visa, he was interrogated for five hours by North Korean customs officials and fined $500.
Eager to differentiate, provincial authorities have since re-branded the South Korean ski resort as “PyeongChang,” using an upper-case “C.”


UAE launches global tolerance initiative for youth

Updated 14 November 2019

UAE launches global tolerance initiative for youth

  • The initiative aims to create “tolerance rings” in the digital space
  • The minister unveiled a commemorative stamp issued by Emirates Post

DUBAI: A new online initiative that seeks to encourage tolerance through dialogue among youth in the UAE, the region and around the world was announced during the second day of the World Tolerance Summit in Dubai on Thursday.
The Tolerance without Borders initiative was announced by Sheikh Nahyan bin Mubarak Al-Nahyan, the UAE’s minister of tolerance, during his keynote speech.
The initiative aims to create “tolerance rings” in the digital space, giving youth a platform for peaceful dialogue that extends beyond religious, cultural, linguistic and spatial barriers.
“We hope to see the youth of the UAE at the forefront of this initiative, engaging in communication that’s based on tolerance and acceptance with their peers here at home and around the world,” said Al-Nahyan, who is also chairman of the board of trustees at the International Institute for Tolerance.
He added that the late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al-Nahyan was the pioneer behind the UAE’s prosperity, and had built a “space for coexistence and tolerance” that has helped the country’s peaceful development.
“We’re proud that we, a country in which all human beings live, with real love and genuine tolerance, live and work together to build a future for children without fear of intolerance, hatred or discrimination … based on color, religion, sect or race,” said the minister.
He added that positive relations and tolerance between all cultures and beliefs is a pre-requisite to eradicating poverty, discrimination and disease.
“Our presence together at this World Tolerance Summit is a strong declaration that we all have a duty and a responsibility in the constant pursuit of building successful relationships and partnerships across cultural frontiers,” he said.
The minister unveiled a commemorative stamp issued by Emirates Post in collaboration with the Supreme National Committee for the Year of Tolerance.
The summit hosted more than 70 speakers and over 3,000 participants from more than 100 countries.