Elise Christie crashes out again at Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, Vonn finishes 6th

Elise Christie of Britain crashes during her women's 1,500-meters short track speedskating semifinal. (AP)
Updated 17 February 2018

Elise Christie crashes out again at Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, Vonn finishes 6th

PYEONGCHANG: Triple world champion Elize Christie crashed hard into the protective padding on the last corner of her 1,500-meter speed skating semifinal on Saturday and had to be stretchered off the ice.
The British athlete was chasing South Korean leader Choi Min-jeong together with Li Jinyu when Christie and the Chinese skater tangled.
Officials quickly called for medical help and she was stretchered off in tears. There was no immediate information how serious the injury was, but she was moving and fully conscious. Team GB confirmed that Christie was taken to hospital as a precaution and her boyfriend, Hungarian skater Shaolin Liu, told BBC Sport she had not broken any bones and hopes to compete in the 1,000-meter sprint, which starts on Tuesday.
The reigning 1,500-meter world champion was considered among the favorites for the gold medal, having missed out on a 500-meter medal in similar circumstances earlier in the Games. Christie was later penalized and would not have advanced anyway.
Elsewhere, it was also heartbreak for US skier Lindsey Vonn.
The American, generally considered the greatest female ski racer in history, had a bad run in the upper half of the super-G course and had to settle for sixth place, 0.38 seconds behind surprise champion Ester Ledecka of the Czech Republic and 0.27 away from the bronze medal position.
At Vancouver in 2010, she had taken the bronze in the super-G and the gold in the downhill. She was forced to sit out the Sochi Games four years ago after tearing ligaments in her right knee. But this time around, the four-time overall World Cup champion — and owner of the most race wins on that circuit by a woman, second-most by anyone — focused afterward on a particular miscue. It arrived in what she called “the last critical section,” about 6 seconds from the end of a race that took the winner 1 minute, 21.11 seconds to complete, just 0.01 seconds ahead of silver medalist Anna Veith of Austria, the 2014 champion.
Entering a jump-turn combination, Vonn allowed one of her skis to lift off the snow too much and swept several feet wide of the proper path, barely clearing a gate.
“I misjudged how I came in there,” Vonn acknowledged. That gave away more than a quarter of a second to Ledecka in the final quarter of the piste.
If Vonn hadn’t done that, she said, “I think I would be on the podium, at bare minimum. I mean, that mistake was really big, and I’m only a couple tenths out of first. So I would estimate yes.”
Before that portion, “I mean, I felt really good. I was like, ‘Yes! I got this. I got this.’ And I knew I had to focus all the way to the finish because of that turn.”
Vonn will now have a few days to gather herself and begin preparing for her best event, the downhill, which is scheduled for Wednesday.


German regional clubs probed after players mimic Turkish military salute

Updated 59 min 3 sec ago

German regional clubs probed after players mimic Turkish military salute

  • Three teams in the Recklinghausen district, near Gelsenkirchen, will face a disciplinary committee after pictures posted on social media
  • The military gesture has become a hot topic after Turkey players saluted to celebrate goals during Euro 2020 qualifiers against France and Albania

BERLIN: At least five German regional football teams face disciplinary action after their players imitated the military salute performed by the Turkish national team during matches last weekend.
Germany has a Turkish population of around 2.5 million people and three teams in the Recklinghausen district, near Gelsenkirchen, will face a disciplinary committee after pictures posted on social media showed their players made the controversial salute to celebrate goals.
“In one case it was the whole team, in another case, it was five or six players,” Hans-Otto Matthey, the district chairman of the Westphalia Football and Athletics Association (FLVW), told AFP subsidiary SID.
Matthey hopes making the clubs accountable will discourage others in the region, which has a sizeable Turkish community, against repeating the gesture in this weekend’s matches.
“I predict that nobody else will have the nerve to repeat something like this,” he added.
There were also two further cases of teams in Bavaria making the salute. Both clubs are also set to face disciplinary measures.
The military gesture has become a hot topic after Turkey players saluted to celebrate goals during Euro 2020 qualifiers against France in Paris on Monday and on Friday against Albania.
The salute is seen as a reference to Turkey’s military operation against Kurdish militants in Syria, which has been condemned by both France and Germany.
Turkey’s sports minister Mehmet Muharrem Kasapoglu has described the controversial gesture as a “nice salute,” but European football’s ruling body UEFA is investigating the national team for the “potential provocative political behavior” of its players.
After the isolated incidents of saluting in Germany’s lower leagues, several regional governing bodies have taken a clear stance.
Both the Bavarian (BFV) and North German Football Associations (NFV) have warned players in their areas to expect “heavy penalties” for imitating the military salute, with other the associations in Berlin and Wurttemberg following suit.
“Insults and provocations have no place on or off the pitch and will not be tolerated,” an NFV football official told SID.
The German Football Association (DFB) took a similar stance last weekend.
Germany internationals Emre Can and Ilkay Gundogan, who have Turkish roots, apologized on Sunday after they both clicked ‘Like’ on a picture of the Turkish footballers saluting during Friday’s 1-0 win over Albania, which they later removed.
“We are against all forms of violence and discrimination,” said national team director Oliver Bierhoff.