Saudi Cabinet announces KSA’s $1bn pledge for Iraq reconstruction projects

King Salman presides over a cabinet meeting in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (REUTERS)
Updated 21 February 2018

Saudi Cabinet announces KSA’s $1bn pledge for Iraq reconstruction projects

RIYADH: The Saudi Cabinet has expressed the Kingdom’s eagerness for stability in Iraq and its permanent stand with all its sects and parties based on the teachings of Islam and the two countries’ historic relations.
Chaired by King Salman at Al-Yamamah Palace on Tuesday, the Cabinet also announced the allocation of $1 billion for the reconstruction projects in Iraq in addition to another $500 million to fund Saudi exports to the country during the Kuwait International Conference for Reconstruction of Iraq.
The Cabinet praised a statement from the foreign ministers of global coalition countries fighting the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (popularly known as Daesh) and their determination to continue fighting and eradicating the terror group.
The Cabinet also appreciated the coalition’s efforts and cooperation to cope with developments and find the best means to deal with threats posed by Daesh.
The Cabinet also renewed the Kingdom’s condemnation of the recent suicide attack in Maiduguri, Nigeria, and the shooting incident at a church in Dagestan, Russia, and offered condolences to the families of the victims.
Later, the Cabinet approved three agreements on political consultations, the Saudi-Korean Vision (2030) and air transport services between the Kingdom and the governments of New Zealand, South Korea and Australia.


Majority of Saudi youth ‘highly interested’ in volunteer work

Updated 26 min 8 sec ago

Majority of Saudi youth ‘highly interested’ in volunteer work

  • The main reason given for preventing Saudi youth from volunteering was not having enough time

RIYADH: The majority of Saudi youth would be more than willing to get involved in volunteer work, according to a survey.

The study found that 84 percent of the 1,126 young people questioned were “highly interested” in donating their time to take part in community programs.

Almost half of those quizzed from throughout the Kingdom — of which 64 percent were men and 36 percent women – said that finding a volunteer opportunity in the Saudi community was “easy,” while 27 percent found it “difficult” and 11 percent claimed no openings were available.

However, 14 percent noted that young Saudis did not receive enough information about volunteer opportunities.

The results of the survey, conducted by the National Center for Public Opinion Polls at the King Abdul Aziz Center for National Dialogue, in Riyadh, also showed that 70 percent of respondents had read or heard about the importance and advantages of volunteering, as opposed to 30 percent who were unaware.

Of those questioned, 45 percent had already participated in volunteer work, and the expectations of 68 percent of them were met.

The main reason given for preventing Saudi youth from volunteering was not having enough time (49 percent), while 24 percent said they “did not know about the volunteer opportunities,” 13 percent “had difficulty in getting volunteer opportunities,” and 12 percent replied by saying they had never been asked to contribute their time.

The motivations for taking part were “serving the community” (22 percent), “appreciation incentives” (16 percent), “financial incentives” (12 percent), “self-fulfillment and self-satisfaction” (7.5 percent), and “learning values and ethics” (7 percent).

Around 5 percent of other important incentives were to “acquire knowledge and skills,” “build social relationships,” “develop a career,” “submit the volunteer hours to work and school,” and “experience the volunteer work environment.”