Kurdish YPG militia says Syrian army must help to stop Turkey

Turkish-backed Syrian rebel fighters are seen in the town of Salwah, less than 10 kilometres from the Syria-Turkey border, ahead of firing towards Kurdish forces from the People's Protection Units (YPG) in the Afrin region, on Feb. 19, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 23 February 2018

Kurdish YPG militia says Syrian army must help to stop Turkey

ANKARA: The Syrian Kurdish YPG militia said on Thursday that fighters backing the Syrian regime were deploying on the frontlines to help repel a Turkish assault, but that assistance would be needed from the regime forces itself.
“Groups aligned to the Syrian Army came to Afrin, but not in the quantity or capacity to stop the Turkish occupation,” YPG spokesman Nouri Mahmoud told Reuters. “The Syrian army must fulfil its duty ... to protect Syria’s borders.”
The YPG has called on the Syrian regime to send troops to the Afrin region in the northwest, and pro-Damascus militias arrived there late on Tuesday. Hundreds of those fighters have been deployed on front lines in Afrin battling Turkish forces, Mahmoud said.
But Assad did not send the army itself, a deployment that could have sparked a wider direct confrontation with the Syrian government if Turkey did not back down.
Ankara, a pro-Assad commander and Kurdish officials have all said recently that Russia intervened to stop Damascus sending the army to defend Afrin after reports of a deal with the Syrian Kurdish forces.
While Russia is Assad’s strongest ally in the war, it is also working with Turkey, which backs rebel factions, to negotiate a wider settlement to the conflict.
Yesterday, Turkish Deputy Prime Minister Bekir Bozdag said he believed there was no deal in place between the Syrian government and the YPG.
“We have information that they have not reached a deal,” Bozdag said in a televised interview.
In a separate area, a witness and a war-monitoring group said government forces moved into a Kurdish-held enclave in the north of the city of Aleppo on Thursday morning.
Assad has repeatedly said he wants to take back every inch of Syria, but the state has tolerated the Kurdish control over the Sheikh Maqsoud area and nearby neighborhoods in Aleppo.


Hard-hit Turkey’s easing of lockdown criticized

Updated 30 May 2020

Hard-hit Turkey’s easing of lockdown criticized

ANKARA: Turkey is easing its coronavirus lockdown from June 1, despite the World Health Organization saying it is one of the leading European countries for coronavirus infections. 

The virus has killed 4,461 people in Turkey, and there were 160,979 infections as of May 28. It ranks 10th worldwide in confirmed COVID-19 cases. Restaurants and cafes will be allowed to reopen from Monday while intercity travel restrictions will be lifted the same day.

Many professional organizations, especially the Turkish Medical Association, find the abrupt restart of business activity to be premature and have called for increased testing, claiming that mass gatherings may trigger further contagion as the first wave of the outbreak is not yet over.

Lebanese security forces began handing out fines to enforce the wearing of face masks, as the country recorded four new cases to bring its tally to 1,172.

Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia recorded 17 new COVID-19-related deaths, raising the total to 458. There were 1,581 new cases reported in Saudi Arabia, meaning 81,766 people have now contracted the disease. There are 24,295 active cases.

France’s national health agency reported a sudden jump in new infections — just an hour after the prime minister announced a sweeping national reopening plan. The agency clarified that the new figures were the result of a new accounting method, and not linked to a much-feared second wave of the virus.