James Joyce collection donated to New York library

A statue of James Joyce in Zurich’s Fluntern cemetery, where he is buried. (Reuters)
Updated 16 March 2018
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James Joyce collection donated to New York library

NEW YORK: One of the foremost private collections of works by the influential Irish writer James Joyce has been donated to New York’s Morgan Library and Museum.
The 350-piece collection includes numerous signed and inscribed first editions, photographs, posters and manuscripts, including a fragment of his magnum opus “Ulysses” and rare pressings of 78 RPM recordings of the author.
The collection was assembled by New York gallery owner Sean Kelly and his wife Mary.
“It is difficult to summarize in a few words the importance of this extraordinary gift to the Morgan Library & Museum,” said museum director Colin Bailey.
“It adds enormously to our small but distinguished Joyce collection, and instantly establishes the Morgan as a major center for scholarly research related to the author’s life and work.”
The museum is planning a public exhibition in 2022, the centennial of the publication of “Ulysses.”
Joyce’s life and works are also commemorated at the James Joyce Center in Dublin and in a collection at the University of Buffalo.
The Morgan Library is the former private library of John Pierpont “JP” Morgan, a central figure in the world of finance at the turn of the 20th century.
It was opened to the public by his son following his death and has since become a museum focused on literature.


What We Are Reading Today: Sorting Out the Mixed Economy by Amy C. Offner

Updated 19 September 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Sorting Out the Mixed Economy by Amy C. Offner

In the years after 1945, a flood of US advisors swept into Latin America with dreams of building a new economic order and lifting the Third World out of poverty. 

These businessmen, economists, community workers, and architects went south with the gospel of the New Deal on their lips, but Latin American realities soon revealed unexpected possibilities within the New Deal itself, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

 In Colombia, Latin Americans and US advisors ended up decentralizing the state, privatizing public functions, and launching austere social welfare programs. By the 1960s, they had remade the country’s housing projects, river valleys, and universities. 

They had also generated new lessons for the US itself. When the Johnson administration launched the War on Poverty, US social movements, business associations, and government agencies all promised to repatriate the lessons of development, and they did so by multiplying the uses of austerity and for-profit contracting within their own welfare state.