OIC rights body: Hate speech must be countered to ensure peaceful coexistence

Representatives of the OIC Independent Permanent Human Rights Commission (IPHRC) visiting a Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh on January 8, 2018 . (Courtesy: OIC website)
Updated 22 March 2018

OIC rights body: Hate speech must be countered to ensure peaceful coexistence

JEDDAH: The OIC Independent Permanent Human Rights Commission (IPHRC) affirmed its commitment to addressing ethnic oppression on Wednesday as it observed the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. 

The IPHRC said that it joined the international community in observing the day and its theme, “Promoting tolerance, inclusion, unity and respect for diversity in the context of combating racial discrimination.”

The commission said that Islam laid the foundation of a culture steeped in the principles of equality among all people regardless of caste, color, creed or religious beliefs.

The growing signs of intolerance and failure to accept diversity in the form of xenophobia, hatred and discrimination based on race, religion, origin and ethnicity had resulted in blatant human rights violations of affected communities, it said.

"Unfortunately, these acts of intolerance are not only prevalent in developing societies facing conflicts but are equally affecting the developed world, where the politics of the far-right is breeding the seeds of discord and promoting xenophobia and demonizing of migrants, refugees and other minorities," it said. "Such a culture of hate and intolerance is not conducive for the creation of peaceful societies and continues to constitute a threat to global peace and security."

The IPHRC also reminded the international community that hate speech, including Islamophobia, must be countered to ensure peaceful coexistence in all societies.

To this end, the commission urged the implementation of UN Human Rights Council Resolution 16/18, which conveys an international resolve to combat all forms of discrimination, hatred and violence based on religion or belief to avoid a clash among cultures.

"The IPHRC welcomes the adoption of Resolution No. 72/157 by the UN General Assembly on Dec. 19, 2017 and Sustainable Development Goals 2030, which recognizes respect for cultural diversity as an integral element for ensuring the sustainable development of nations and cultures through the promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, tolerance, mutual respect, inter-cultural understanding and global citizenship and shared responsibility," it said.


Resumption of international flights draws mixed expat reaction

Photo/SPA
Updated 54 sec ago

Resumption of international flights draws mixed expat reaction

  • International flights to and from the Kingdom were suspended on March

RIYADH: The decision to allow international travel to and from the Kingdom has evoked mixed reactions in the expatriate community.

The decision by Saudi Arabia’s Ministry of Interior to allow expatriates who have exit and entry visas as well as visit visas to travel across borders on Sept. 13 came as a relief for many expats who are used to vacationing in their home countries.

Although many are excited about the news as their wait to visit relatives and friends has come to an end, there are others who are opting to stay in the Kingdom, fearful of the return of restrictions — as well as of coronavirus infection in their own countries.

Faiz Al-Najdi, a Pakistani expatriate working as a consultant on a project with the Royal Commission at Yanbu, told Arab News: “It’s a sigh of relief, especially for the expatriates that international flights have been resumed by the Saudi government with certain conditions.”

“The expatriate workers and their families have been waiting impatiently for this good news of flights to resume since they were shut down six months ago,” he said.

International flights to and from the Kingdom were suspended on March 15 as part of preventative measures to stop the spread of COVID-19, but as the situation has improved countries around the world are beginning to open up. Saudi Arabia has also reviewed its coronavirus travel policies, resuming international flights with conditions.

Al-Najdi said: “As I see it there are people with varied opinions. There are families who want to fly back home and are happy to reunite with their relatives and friends; so are those who were stranded in their home countries and were not able to return to the Kingdom. This includes those expatriate workers who wanted to return and rejoin their jobs here.”

However, there are some who were skeptical, he said. “Although they can fly home they want to stay put here as they feel far safer compared to being in their respective countries due to COVID-19 getting out of control back home.”

“In my opinion it’s a good and commendable step by the Saudi government and I welcome this decision,” he said.

Akhtarul Islam Siddiqui, an Indian expatriate in Riyadh, told Arab News: “Even though I love my home country India, as a Kingdom-lover too I prefer to stay with my family here in this pandemic situation. I am more worried for my two daughters who are stranded in India, where the number of cases are among the highest worldwide.”

Rafiul Akhter, an Indian expat who is a finance professional working with the Advanced Electronics Co. Ltd, Riyadh, said: “Living away from family, friends and home country is often the hardest part of being an expatriate. News of the resumption of international flight from Saudi Arabia is a ray of hope to boost my energy levels.”

“The Saudi government handled this pandemic so promptly. I’m blessed to be safe in Saudi Arabia, but on the other hand I am worried about my motherland where my family is facing this pandemic all alone and feeling so helpless that I could not be there to support them,” he said.

“Now that I can travel to my loved ones, there are a few facts that have got muddled in all of the enthusiasm about the conditions of returning to Saudi Arabia that require some clearing up. I hope that in the coming days the confusion is cleared and we, the expats, can plan a stress-free trip to our loved ones,” he said.

Since schools resumed virtual classes after the summer break, many expats have opted to stay for the sake of their children’s schooling and will not travel at least till the winter break. However, it is a good news for those whose family is back in their home country.

Dr. Kifaya Ifthikar, a Sri Lankan doctor in Riyadh, told Arab News: “We are ecstatic to see our fellow Sri Lankan expats returning to our motherland safe and sound.”

“COVID-19 took from us many things that are irreplaceable, but it also gave us the opportunity to realize the little things in life, like being close to family. I am glad that soon they will all be together with their loved ones,” she said.