People are scrolling through 90 meters web content every day – that’s the same as the height of the Statue of Liberty

Updated 11 April 2018

People are scrolling through 90 meters web content every day – that’s the same as the height of the Statue of Liberty

  • Five million jobs will go by 2020 because of various technological advancements
  • By 2020 the Internet will be accessible to double the amount of people it is now

JEDDAH: People scroll through 90 meters of web content every day – that is the same height as New York’s Statue of Liberty, according to Facebook’s Regional Director in the Middle East, Turkey and Africa, Ari Kesisoglu.

And by 2020, that number will likely double from the current four billion, as internet usage and reach continue to grow, Kesisoglu said at the TopCEO18 forum at the Bay La Sun Hotel in King Abdullah Economic City on Wednesday.

Kesisoglu said that since the beginning of time until 2003, when the internet began to boom, humanity has generated approximately five billion gigabytes of information. “Every 10 minutes, we create that amount of information now,” he revealed.

But he said the brain’s processing power would be aided by the growth in the content we consume.

According to a study in 2001 found that the human brain could process a single thought in 0.3 of a second. The same study was repeated again in 2014, and the human brain had developed in order to adapt to media changes and internet feed into processing a thought in 0.03 of a second.

 

IN NUMBERS

  • 80 percent of Internet users will be using a mobile messaging app by 2020 - currently only half of the four billion with Internet access use such apps.
  • People stay five times longer on video content than that which is static
  • 40 percent of mobile users leave a website when it doesn’t load in 3 seconds.
  • We scroll 90 meters of content in a day, Usain Bolt sprints 100 meters in 9 seconds

 With the rapid pace at which the internet is developing, and our brains leaping to keep up, “by 2020, the majority of the world will be connected to the internet,” Kesisoglu said.

“There is going to be a massive gap between content creation and our ability to consume content, and that gap will continue grow because of our brains and how powerful they are.”

He predicted that our dependency on our mobiles and the internet would continue to grow – but this same growth in reliance, he said, would make people more vulnerable to the devices they hold so dearly.

To emphasize his point, he told delegates to unlock their phones and hand them to the person on their left. “How does that feel?” he asked, as the audience struggled to smile in spite of their evident discomfort. “We cannot ignore how important mobiles are,” he added.

Despite the apparent reliance on technology by so many, its advancement will leave millions back on the job market, Kesisoglu explained. As many as 5 million jobs will be lost to AI, robotics and nanotechnology according to a recent World Economic Forum report.

But there is a line of thought that suggests that these same technologies will ultimately lead to a reskilling of the workforce – and half of that will be millennials by 2020, he said.

 

 THE LIST:
Jobs that weren’t available but became possible because of the evolution of the Internet:

  • AI engineer
  • Cloud specialist
  • App developer
  • Drone operator
  • Vlogger/blogger
  • Social media consultant
  • Autonomous car engineer
  • Big data analyst
  • Uber/Careem driver
     


MBC hires Marc Antoine d’Halluin as new CEO

Updated 10 December 2019

MBC hires Marc Antoine d’Halluin as new CEO

  • Appointment comes as Saudi-owned broadcaster launches video-on-demand “Shahid” platform

LONDON: Saudi-owned broadcaster MBC has hired Marc Antoine d’Halluin as its new CEO following the departure of veteran broadcaster Sam Barnett.

MBC founder Waleed Al-Ibrahim said his new CEO would drive forward the company’s five-year growth plan announced last year and which has a heavy emphasis on developing video on demand (VOD) content.

D’Halluin started his career at Sony Pictures Entertainment and prior to joining MBC Group was the chairman of the Luxembourg-based M7 Group, which operates satellite pay TV in Holland, Belgium, Austria, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary and Romania. M7 Group was recently sold to Vivendi’s Canal+ Group.

Regional broadcasters including MBC are facing increasing competition from new arrivals to the region in the rapidly growing video on demand sector, dominated by Netflix and Amazon.

In response, MBC Group is ramping up investment in its own Arabic-language VOD platform while also targeting the Arab-speaking diaspora.

FASTFACT

MBC was the first private free-to-air Arab satellite TV channel.

Subscription video on demand is expected to more than double in the Middle East and North Africa between 2018 and 2024, according to Digital TV Research. 

Last month, MBC’s VOD platform, known as “Shahid” announced the launch of its first-ever original production. Titled “ElDiva,” the drama series stars Cyrine Abdel Nour in the lead role, alongside actor Yacob Alfarhan, and the Egyptian folk singer and actress, Bosy. 

“MBC was the first major media company in the region to launch a VOD platform,” said Shahid managing director Johannes Larcher at the time of the launch

“Nearly all the international giants of entertainment have turned or are turning their attention to this type of ‘digital first’ content.”

MBC Group originally launched in London in 1991 as the first private free-to-air Arab satellite TV channel and moved to Dubai in 2002. Today it includes a number of leading channels that include the 24-hour Arabic news channel Al Arabiya.