Israel strikes hit more than 30 Gaza ‘military targets’: army

Photo showing Israeli soldiers stand guard next to an Israeli Iron Dome defence system, designed to intercept and destroy incoming short-range rockets and artillery shells, deployed along the border with the Gaza strip, May 29, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 30 May 2018

Israel strikes hit more than 30 Gaza ‘military targets’: army

  • Projectiles were intercepted by the Israeli 'Iron Dome' anti short range missiles system.
  • There were no Israeli casualties reported after the shelling from Gaza.

JERUSALEM: Israel’s military struck more than 30 “military targets” in the Gaza Strip on Tuesday in response to a barrage of rocket and mortar fire from the Palestinian enclave, the army said. Army spokesman Jonathan Conricus told journalists the rocket and mortar fire at Israel was the most extensive since a 2014 war as was Israel’s response.
“We just concluded a significant aerial strike where we struck more than 30 different military targets belonging to terrorist organizations,” Conricus said.
“Amongst those a tunnel and different components of military infrastructure belonging to Hamas and to the Palestinian Islamic Jihad.”
Early Tuesday, a barrage of mortar shells from the Gaza Strip were fired at Israel. Most of the some 28 mortar shells were intercepted by Israeli air defenses and no injuries were reported.
Later in the day, Israel said it intercepted further projectiles fired from the Gaza Strip.
There was no immediate claim of responsibility, but there was speculation the mortars were fired by Islamic Jihad in revenge for a recent incident that left three of its members dead.
Hamas, the Islamist movement that runs the Gaza Strip, said in a statement “what the resistance carried out this morning comes within the framework of the natural right to defend our people.”
Tuesday’s incidents came after weeks of deadly demonstrations and clashes along the Gaza-Israel border, beginning on March 30.
They peaked on May 14, when at least 61 Palestinians were killed as tens of thousands of Gazans protested and clashes erupted on the same day of the US transfer of its embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

 

 

 


Bangladeshi migrants to be repatriated from Libya

Updated 14 November 2019

Bangladeshi migrants to be repatriated from Libya

DHAKA: One hundred and seventy-one Bangladeshi migrants are waiting to be repatriated from two detention centers in Libya after being rescued from the Mediterranean coast on Oct. 30 as they tried to make their way into Europe, officials told Arab News on Wednesday. 

In all, 200 migrants were rescued during the operation.

“The registration process of all the Bangladeshi migrants has been completed and we are expecting to start the repatriation by the end of November,” ASM Ashraful Islam, councilor at the Bangladesh embassy in Libya, said.

He added that, due to the ongoing war in Libya, airports in Tripoli remain non-operational. The Bangladeshi migrants will fly from Misrata airport, 300 kilometers away.

“There are frequent incidents of bombardment and long-range missile strikes (at Tripoli airport),” Islam explained. He said no international airline was currently willing to fly from Libya to Bangladesh, so the embassy intends to charter a flight to repatriate the migrants.

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) will bear the expenses for the rescued Bangladeshis, who are currently being held at detention centers in Zanzur and Abu Salim, he said, adding, “Bangladesh mission staffers in Tripoli are in constant touch with the returnees and providing necessary food and other assistance for them.”

In recent years, human traffickers have used Libya as a gateway through which to send illegal migrants to Italy and other European countries. According to the European Border and Coast Guard Agency — Frontex — around 30,000 Bangladeshi migrants have been arrested while trying to enter Europe in the last decade. The organization said that, in recent years, Bangladesh is one of the countries from which the most illegal migrants have tried to enter Europe. The IOM has facilitated the repatriation of Bangladeshi citizens from Libya in the past — 924 in 2017, 307 in 2016, and 521 in 2015.

“Among unemployed Bangladeshi fortune seekers, there is a (desire) to migrate to Europe by any means, and human-trafficking syndicates at home and abroad (have grabbed) this opportunity,” Shariful Hasan, head of the migration program at the Bangladesh-based development organization BRAC, told Arab News. “There needs to be an integrated effort by all concerned countries, with the support of Interpol, to curb this human trafficking.”