Kuwait terminates more than 3,000 expat public sector employees

The contracts were terminated as part of the Kuwaitization push to replace expat employees with nationals in the government sector. (Shutterstock)
Updated 26 August 2018

Kuwait terminates more than 3,000 expat public sector employees

  • The government has earmarked 44,752 expats for termination – including the 3,140 that have already been dismissed
  • The contracts were terminated as part of the Kuwaitization push to replace expat employees with nationals in the government sector

DUBAI: Kuwait has terminated the employment contracts of 3,140 expatriate public sector employees, the chairman of the Civil Service Commission Ahmad Al-Jassar said, according to local daily Kuwait Times.
The contracts were terminated as part of the Kuwaitization push to replace expat employees with nationals in the government sector.
The government has earmarked 44,752 expats for termination – including the 3,140 that have already been dismissed.
Statistics show expats are employed across 46 government sectors, including 25,948 in teaching and training, 6,474 in services, 3,537 in law and Islamic affairs, 2,876 in engineering and 1,539 in social and educational services as well as sports.


Key to success is passion: PepsiCo official

“I always think success is married with passion,” Simon Lowden said, adding that he likes to get involved with ideas that excite him
Updated 14 November 2019

Key to success is passion: PepsiCo official

  • Lowden was speaking at a session titled “100 years is a long time: Preparing for multiple shifts.”

RIYADH: The key to success is being passionate about what you do, Simon Lowden, chief sustainability officer at PepsiCo, told a brainstorming session at the Misk Global Forum in Riyadh on Wednesday.

“I always think success is married with passion,” he said, adding that he likes to get involved with ideas that excite him.

“I started my life in a small farming village, went to London to attend university, joined PepsiCo … and now I run our sustainability agenda,” he said. “This made me rich as a person, and I did things I really enjoyed.”

Lowden was speaking at a session titled “100 years is a long time: Preparing for multiple shifts.”

Other panelists included Dave Brooke, vice president of client solutions at Dell Technologies; Kevin Gaskell, an international speaker on leadership and business performance; Deloitte CEO David Sproul; and Nancy Yammout, general director of the NGO Rescue Me. The session was moderated by Lebanese journalist and politician Naufal Daou.