Start-up of the Week: Beauty app connects customers with makeup artists and photographers

Updated 19 September 2018

Start-up of the Week: Beauty app connects customers with makeup artists and photographers

  • The FRH app offers its services in Saudi Arabia, in both Madinah and Makkah regions

JEDDAH: Keeping up with the 2030 Vision and supporting Saudi women was behind the concept of the FRH app, which connects customers with professional makeup artists and photographers.
Kholoud Al-Mehdar, public relations director of FRH Application, said customers then rated and reviewed their experience with the service provider.
“The FRH app is targeting Saudi Arabia for starters, then expanding in the Middle East. The crowd-sourcing industry is ever growing in the Arabian market, and FRH is hunting that market share through connecting people who are looking for good service and cheap prices together with their targeted professionals without any subscription fees,” Kholoud said.
The FRH app offers its services in Saudi Arabia, in both Madinah and Makkah regions, and will expand to the rest of Saudi Arabia and the Middle East as the business expands.
FRH launched in January, enabling people to connect easily through instant messaging via the app and the rating service as well for the provided services. The application is free. The services that can be found through this app are for makeup, hair, hair removal, tattoo, nails, skin care and for photography.
“We had the idea almost a year and a half ago where we thought about all the problems facing ladies and beauty artists and photographers in Saudi Arabia. These problems include: Having a lot of upcoming weddings, engagements, parties and not enough time to prepare for them. Also, there are so many good makeup artists that people don’t know about and many photographers whose talents are hidden from the public,” Kholoud said.
She added that people generally did not trust those who worked individually, and for these services peers tended to provide lot of suggestions on who to choose.
“The best ones are so expensive and the cheap ones use bad-quality materials or take bad-quality pictures,” she said. “All these problems were facing women in the present time, since most of the services are now done online, people communicate and have everything done in seconds. So why not booking makeup artists and photographers online as well?
That’s when she and her team started working on the idea of FRH app to solve these problems and to help service providers and customers connect through an elegant and simple platform.
Kholoud is from Madinah, Saudi Arabia. She holds an MA in TESOL from Adelphi University and is a certified makeup artist from Make Up For Ever Academy in New York.
FRH team’s vision is to change the standard rate of service locally through providing quality service and to become a leader in the industry.


South Korean TV ‘reunites’ mother with dead daughter in virtual reality show

This undated handout photo provided on February 14, 2020 by South Korea's Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) in Seoul shows a scene of a documentary "I met you" where a mother meets her dead daughter through virtual reality. (AFP)
Updated 18 February 2020

South Korean TV ‘reunites’ mother with dead daughter in virtual reality show

  • The footage began with the girl — who died of leukaemia in 2016 — emerging from behind a pile of wood in a park, as if playing hide-and-seek
  • “I have missed you Na-yeon,” she told the computer-generated six-year-old, her hands moving to stroke her hair

SEOUL: A tearful reunion between a mother and her dead daughter via advanced virtual reality for a South Korean television has become an online hit, triggering fierce debate about voyeurism and exploitation.
The footage began with the girl — who died of leukaemia in 2016 — emerging from behind a pile of wood in a park, as if playing hide-and-seek.
“Mum, where have you been?” she asks. “I’ve missed you a lot. Have you missed me?“
Tears streaming down her face, Jang Ji-sung reached out toward her, wracked with emotion.
“I have missed you Na-yeon,” she told the computer-generated six-year-old, her hands moving to stroke her hair.
But in the real world, Jang was standing in front of a studio green screen, wearing a virtual reality headset and touch-sensitive gloves, her daughter’s ashes in a locket around her neck.
At times the camera cut to Jang’s watching husband and their three surviving children, wiping away tears of their own.
A nine-minute clip of the Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC) documentary “I met you” has been watched more than 13 million times in a week on Youtube.
Many viewers offered Jang their sympathy and support for the concept.
“My mother unexpectedly passed away two years ago and I wish I could meet her through virtual reality,” said one.
But media columnist Park Sang-hyun said the documentary amounted to exploitation of personal pain.
“It’s understandable a grief-stricken mother would wish to meet her late daughter. I would do the same,” he told AFP.
“The problem lies in that the broadcaster has taken advantage of a vulnerable mother who lost a child for sake of the viewer ratings.”
“If the mother had been counselled before the filming,” he added, “I wonder what kind of a psychiatrist would approve this.”

It took eight months of filming and programming to create the virtual Na-yeon, but the makers of the documentary insisted the broadcast was intended to “console the family” rather than promote virtual reality in ultra-wired South Korea.
The technology presented a “new way to keep loved ones in memory,” one of the producers told reporters.
Jang herself — who has her daughter’s name and date of birth tattooed on her arm in memory — hoped the program could “console” others who had lost loved ones.
“Even though it was a very brief... I was really happy in the moment,” she wrote on her blog — which she has since turned private.
During the broadcast the two sat at a table to celebrate Na-yeon’s missing birthdays, singing “happy birthday” together.
Before blowing out the candles, Na-yeon made a birthday wish: “I want my mother to stop crying.”