IKEA apologizes after customer reports caterpillar in his food

The Swedish furniture retailer opened its first store in India less than a month ago. (Courtesy IKEA)
Updated 03 September 2018

IKEA apologizes after customer reports caterpillar in his food

BENGALURU: IKEA has issued an apology to a customer in the Indian city of Hyderabad after he reported finding a caterpillar in his food at the store and posted a photograph of it on Twitter.
The Swedish furniture retailer opened its first store in India less than a month ago.
Abeed Mohammad posted the picture on Twitter on Friday and Indian media reported that the city’s food safety officials conducted a raid at the company’s store.
Officials from Hyderabad’s civic body inspected the premises of IKEA and confiscated food samples, the Hindu newspaper reported over the weekend.
During the inspection, it was determined that the store was not complying with waste segregation norms and a fine of 15,000 rupees ($211.18) was issued, the report said.


IKEA said it had apologized to the customer.
“We are currently investigating the matter to understand what happened and take immediate action,” an IKEA spokeswoman said.

 


Mumbai DJ swaps deck for doctor’s scrubs to fight coronavirus

Updated 28 May 2020

Mumbai DJ swaps deck for doctor’s scrubs to fight coronavirus

  • DJ Sanjay Meriya, known as The Spindoctor in Mumbai music circles, began work last month as a medical volunteer

MUMBAI: As India’s financial capital Mumbai battled a growing number of coronavirus cases, local DJ Sanjay Meriya set aside his turntable and dusted off a long-unused medical degree in order to help out.
Meriya, 30, known as The Spindoctor in Mumbai music circles, began work last month as a medical volunteer after spotting a government newspaper ad asking for help.
He has chiefly been visiting a slum in one of Mumbai’s worst-hit suburbs, clad in a protective suit and gloves, to instruct local residents about the precautions they should take to ward off the coronavirus.
“I’m very patriotic. I can battle this way (as a doctor),” Meriya, who signed up as a volunteer for at least three months, told Reuters.
Mumbai accounts for more than 32,000 of India’s 150,000 cases of the coronavirus, making it the worst-hit city. With government hospitals short of beds and health officials overworked, volunteers like Meriya are all the more important.
Meriya began to dabble in DJing as a hobby at around the age of 20 while studying for his medical degree, but said it then “took over me” — much to his family’s dismay.
“They hated it. They still hate it,” he said of his decision to devote himself to being a DJ.
Although worried about his potential exposure to the virus, Meriya’s family is thrilled to see him back in medicine.
“They now have a lot to share with all our relatives, if you know what I mean when it comes to Indian families,” he said.