Nobel Peace Prize winner Murad urges world to fight genocide

Nadia Murad speaking in Washington after winning the Nobel Peace prize last week. (AFP)
Updated 08 October 2018

Nobel Peace Prize winner Murad urges world to fight genocide

WASHINGTON: Iraqi Nobel Peace Prize winner Nadia Murad called on Monday for the world to do more to fight genocide and sexual violence.
In her first news conference since accepting the award she said she feels obligated to use her voice to defend the rights of persecuted people around the world.
The 25-year-old Murad was among thousands of young women from the Yazidi minority who were kidnapped and enslaved in 2014 by Daesh. She says she is honored to be a Nobel recipient, but says much more needs to be done to help Yazidis forced from their homes.
Murad was speaking at the National Press Club in Washington.
She was awarded the peace price Friday along with Dr. Denis Mukwege of Congo.


Macron slams Turkey’s aggression in Syria as ‘madness’, bewails NATO inaction

Updated 51 min 8 sec ago

Macron slams Turkey’s aggression in Syria as ‘madness’, bewails NATO inaction

  • EU Council President Donald Tusk said the halt of Turkish hostilities as demanded by the US is not a genuine cease-fire
  • He calls on Ankara to immediately stop military operations,

BRUSSELS/ANKARA: Macron critizes Turkey's aggression in Syria as "madness', bewails NATO inaction

France’s President Emmanuel Macron has bemoaned Turkey’s offensive into northern Syria as “madness” and decried NATO’s inability to react to the assault as a “serious mistake.”

“It weakens our credibility in finding partners on the ground who will be by our side and who think they will be protected in the long term. So that raises questions about how NATO functions.”

EU Council President Donald Tusk said the halt of Turkish hostilities is not a genuine cease-fire and called on Ankara to immediately stop military operations in Syria.

Dareen Khalifa, a senior Syria analyst at the International Crisis Group, said the cease-fire had unclear goals. 

There was no mention of the scope of the area that would be under Turkish control and, despite US Vice President Mike Pence referring to a 20-mile zone, the length of the zone remains ambiguous, she said.

Selim Sazak, a doctoral researcher at Brown University, believed the agreement would be implemented and the YPG would withdraw.

“The agency of the YPG is fairly limited. If the deal collapses because of the YPG, it’s actually all the better for Ankara,” he told Arab News. “What Ankara originally wanted was to take all of the belt into its control and eliminate as many of the YPG forces as possible. Instead, the YPG is withdrawing with a portion of its forces and its territory intact. Had the deal collapsed because of the YPG, Ankara would have reason to push forward, this time with much more legitimacy.”