Iran arrests 10 suspects in suicide bombing that killed two

A suicide bomber killed at least two people outside the police headquarters in the port city of Chabahar in restive southeastern Iran, according to a revised official toll. (AFP)
Updated 09 December 2018

Iran arrests 10 suspects in suicide bombing that killed two

  • “Good clues have been obtained and hopefully with the public’s cooperation ... we will get to the main leads,” according to Iranian police chief
  • At least 48 people were also injured in Thursday’s suicide car bomb attack by a Sunni militant group on a police headquarters in the port city of Chabahar in southeast Iran

DUBAI: Iranian security forces have detained 10 people suspected of links to a suicide car bomb attack this week that killed at least two policemen, police chief Hossein Ashtari said on Sunday.
“Good clues have been obtained and hopefully with the public’s cooperation ... we will get to the main leads,” Ashtari was quoted by the state news agency IRNA as saying.
More suspects have been identified and are being sought, Ashtari added.
At least 48 people were also injured in Thursday’s suicide car bomb attack by a Sunni militant group on a police headquarters in the port city of Chabahar in southeast Iran, according to state media.
While suicide bombings are rare in Iran, Sunni militant groups have carried out several attacks on security forces in recent years in Sistan-Baluchestan province, where Chabahar is located.
The province is home to a Sunni minority in the largely Shiite country, and it has also long been plagued by violence from both drug smugglers and separatists.
The US-based SITE Intelligence Group and Iranian state media reported that Sunni Baluch militant group Ansar Al-Furqan had claimed responsibility for the attack.
Iran has threatened to hit militant bases in neighboring Pakistan unless Islamabad took action to secure its border area, which Tehran says has become a safe haven for anti-Iran groups to operate.


Thousands return to government-seized areas in northwest Syria: state media

Updated 27 min 58 sec ago

Thousands return to government-seized areas in northwest Syria: state media

  • The Syrian Observatory reported “around 3,000 people” going home from other areas under regime control
  • The Idlib region is one of the last holdouts of opposition forces

DAMASCUS: Thousands have returned to their hometowns in northwest Syria after military advances by government loyalist against militants and allied rebels, state media said Sunday.
“Thousands of citizens return to their villages and towns of the northern Hama countryside and the southern Idlib countryside,” state news agency SANA said.
The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a Britain-based monitor, reported “around 3,000 people” going home from other areas under regime control.
Since August 31, a cease-fire announced by regime backer Russia has largely held in northwestern Syria, though the Observatory has reported sporadic bombardment.
SANA said the returns came amid “government efforts to return the displaced to their towns and villages.”
The Idlib region of around three million people, many of them dispaced by fighting in other areas, is one of the last holdouts of opposition to forces backing Syrian President Bashar Assad.
Moscow announced the cease-fire late last month after four months of deadly violence that displaced 400,000 people, most of whom fled north within the jihadist-run bastion, according to the United Nations.
Regime forces had chipped away at the southern edges of the jihadist-run stronghold throughout August, retaking towns and villages in the north of Hama province and the south of Idlib province.
Syria’s civil war has killed more than 370,000 people since it started in 2011 with the repression of anti-government protests.
Assad’s regime now controls more than 60 percent of the country after notching up a series of victories against rebels and jihadists with key Russian backing since 2015.
But a large chunk of Idlib, fully administered by Syria’s former Al-Qaeda affiliate since January, as well as a Kurdish-held swathe of the oil-rich northeast, remain beyond its reach.