FaceOf: John Pagano, CEO of the Red Sea Development Co.

FaceOf: John Pagano, CEO of the Red Sea Development Co.
John Pagano
Updated 24 January 2019

FaceOf: John Pagano, CEO of the Red Sea Development Co.

FaceOf: John Pagano, CEO of the Red Sea Development Co.
  • Pagano has more than 35 years’ international experience in the commercial property industry in Europe, North America and the Caribbean
  • He holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Toronto, Canada

John Pagano has been CEO of the Red Sea Development Co. (TRSDC), one of three megaprojects aimed at diversifying the Saudi economy in line with Vision 2030, since January 2018. 

The Red Sea development announced in July 2017 is one of the world’s most ambitious luxury tourism and hospitality projects. 

Pagano has more than 35 years’ international experience in the commercial property industry in Europe, North America and the Caribbean. 

Before joining TRSDC, he headed his own company, Old Fort Capital Investments, based in London. The firm offered strategic advice and services to landowners, investors and developers with a focus on large real estate developments.

Previously, he held leading positions at the Canary Wharf development in London, where he worked from 1988 to 2005 and 2011 to 2015.

Pagano was also president of the Baha Mar Development Company, based in the Bahamas, for four years.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Toronto, Canada.

TRSDC recently received final approval from its board for a master plan drawn up in partnership with global design firm WATG and engineering giant BuroHappold.

“With the master plan approved, we are now identifying investors and partners who are interested in working with us on realizing the objectives of the project and who share our commitment to enhance, not exploit, the natural ecosystems that make the destination so unique,” Pagano said.


Arab coalition intercepts, destroys Houthi drones targeting Saudi Arabia

Arab coalition intercepts, destroys Houthi drones targeting Saudi Arabia
Updated 05 March 2021

Arab coalition intercepts, destroys Houthi drones targeting Saudi Arabia

Arab coalition intercepts, destroys Houthi drones targeting Saudi Arabia
  • The UAE condemned the attempts of the Iranian-backed Houthi militia to target civilians in Khamis Mushait

DUBAI: The Arab coalition intercepted and destroyed six Houthi drones targeting Saudi Arabia’s Khamis Mushait on Friday, state news agency SPA reported.
Spokesman Col Turki Al-Maliki said the militia’s attempts to attack civilians in a deliberate and systematic manner constitute war crimes.

He added that the coalition implements the necessary measures to protect civilians in accordance with international humanitarian law and its customary rules.

The UAE condemned the attempts of the Iranian-backed Houthi militia to target civilians in Khamis Mushait.
The foreign ministry confirmed that the continuation of these attacks in recent times is a dangerous escalation, and proves the militia’s efforts to undermine security and stability in the region.
The Ministry further renewed the UAE’s full solidarity with the Kingdom and supporting it in all the measures it takes to preserve its security and the safety of its citizens and residents.

Earlier on Thursday, the coalition also intercepted and destroyed a ballistic missile fired by Houthis towards Jazan.
The attack on Jazan comes days after the coalition thwarted a ballistic missile attack by the Iranian-backed Houthis on the Saudi capital Riyadh, and destroyed six armed drones launched towards cities in the Kingdom’s south.
The Kingdom has seen an increase in attacks by the militia after a Houthi attack on the Kingdom’s Abha International airport in February.

Yemen’s Foreign Minister Ahmed bin Mubarak condemned recent attacks by the Houthis, saying that they hindered the peace process and blamed Iran for the ongoing crisis in the country.
“The Iranian interventions have become a formidable obstruction to peace as Iran has turned the Yemeni conflict into a negotiating card that Iranian regime capitalizes on to serve its nuclear negotiations,” he said.


Saudi father champions organ donation cause after miracle saves daughter’s life

Saudi  father champions organ donation cause after miracle saves daughter’s life
Updated 05 March 2021

Saudi father champions organ donation cause after miracle saves daughter’s life

Saudi  father champions organ donation cause after miracle saves daughter’s life
  • Citizens need to educate themselves about the process and urgent need for organ donors

RIYADH: A Saudi father has made it his mission in life to help others receive the same opportunities as his daughter after a liver transplant saved her life when she was just 70-days-old.

Soliman Saidi, whose daughter Salma turns three this year, is campaigning to have more Saudis sign up to become organ donors.
Saidi, a motivational speaker who has been advocating organ donation, spoke to Arab News about the urgent need for more volunteers in the Kingdom to donate organs after death in order to help save lives.
“Most people have a lot of misconceptions about organ donation,” he said.

“They assume that signing up to be a donor means that they will have to sacrifice body parts that they need to survive, but that’s never the case. While some organs can be donated while a person is still alive, like a kidney or part of the liver, organs like the heart and lungs can only be donated after a person is dead.”
Saidi added that, from a religious point of view, there is nothing to prevent potential donors from signing up.
A 1982 fatwa (religious edict) by the Senior Ulama Commission concerning organ donation and transplantation granted “the permissibility to remove an organ or part thereof from a dead person,” and the permissibility of a living person donating an organ or part of it.
The Kingdom’s primary organization for organ transplants was founded in 1984, the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation (SCOT). Since then, the organization has worked to raise awareness of the importance of organ donation and has given Saudis a platform where they can sign-up to become donors.

Soliman Saidi is grateful to still have his daughter in his life every single day. (Supplied)

However, statistics suggest that more citizens need to educate themselves about the process and the urgent need for organ donors.
A 2019 study published in the Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation showed that the majority of the Kingdom’s population are unaware of any local or international organ donation legislation. The level of knowledge was as low as 12.6 percent, which the study claims has led to a low number of potential organ donors in the country.
The same study indicates that Saudi Arabia has a low organ donation rate, estimated at 2 to 4 per million population (PMP). Compared with other countries, such as the US with a 26 PMP donor rate, the number is fairly low.
However, SCOT has nonetheless seen success in the Kingdom. According to figures recorded between 1986 and 2016, there were 13,174 organs transplanted from living and deceased donors, including 10,569 kidneys, 2,006 livers, 339 hearts, 213 lungs and 46 pancreases.
Saidi was motivated to start campaigning for the cause in 2018 after he received what he said was “the worst news of his life” just months after the birth of his youngest child.
“Two months after Salma was born, she experienced liver failure. By the time we realized what was happening, her liver was already failing by about 70 percent,” he said.
Saidi recalled the desperation he felt after being told that Salma needed a Kasai procedure, a risky operation that involves the removal of blocked bile ducts and the gallbladder, and replacing them with a segment of the small intestine.
Doctors informed him that the procedure had a 1 percent chance of saving her life, but he was willing to take the risk.
“She was barely 70 days old,” he said. “I remember thinking ‘dear God, if she has to go under the knife tomorrow, let her live. I want to see her as a bride someday, let her have a chance.’”

HIGHLIGHTS

• A 1982 fatwa (religious edict) by the Senior Ulama Commission concerning organ donation and transplantation granted ‘the permissibility to remove an organ or part thereof from a dead person,’ and the permissibility of a living person donating an organ or part of it.

• Those interested in signing up as organ donors after death in Saudi Arabia can register with SCOT on their website.

However, the procedure was only a temporary solution, and it eventually became clear that what Salma needed was a liver transplant.
“There was nothing we could do at that point but leave it up to Allah,” he said. “At that point, we were fully desperate, and feeling so helpless. All we could do was ask Allah to spare her life.”
Miraculously, Saidi, together with his wife Hajer, were able to arrange for Salma to be moved to the King Faisal Specialist Hospital in Riyadh. They also flew to the capital from their home in Jeddah in the hopes that they would find a donor for their daughter.
“Finding any type of organ donor is a long process, but liver donors in particular are rare. It normally takes ages,” said Saidi. “And this was happening during the Eid Al-Adha holiday. We were fast losing hope that we would find a donor in time.”
However, through the dedicated efforts of hospital staff, Hajer was picked as a viable donor and the family were informed that they could begin preparations almost immediately.
Saidi said that one of the most emotional experiences of the whole process was the way people online had reacted to his plight, and the number of people who reached out when he posted about the issue on social media.
“People were calling me and literally pleading with me to allow them to donate,” he said, growing emotional as he recounted the story. “One of the most incredible gestures I received was a man who called from Tabuk and asked me only to arrange things with hospital staff to allow him to fly in and donate part of his liver, and specifically requested that I not meet with him in order to maintain
anonymity.”
The experience moved him, and when it became clear that both mother and daughter would make a full recovery, Saidi decided to become a champion for
the cause of organ donation in the Kingdom.
“I learned very quickly that convincing people to donate a part of themselves after death was hard enough on its own, let alone trying to convince them to donate while they’re alive,” he said. “But after my own experience, I was determined to do whatever I could to help.”
Saidi is also an adviser to a nonprofit organization, Awad Al-Amal, which enables young patients and their families to overcome disease and difficulties by providing rehabilitation programs and voluntary health services.
Today, Saidi says he has made peace with what happened, and is grateful to still have his daughter in his life every single day.
“I believe everything happens for a reason,” he told Arab News, “I think this experience taught me to never take anything for granted, and it humbled me and reminded me that no one is untouchable in this life.”
Those interested in signing up as organ donors after death in Saudi Arabia can register with SCOT on their website at scot.gov.sa/ar/Register/Index?type=AfterDie.


Saudi scouts in environmental protection project

Saudi scouts in environmental protection project
Updated 05 March 2021

Saudi scouts in environmental protection project

Saudi scouts in environmental protection project

RIYADH: The Saudi Arabian Boy Scouts Association is continuing with an environmental protection project throughout the Kingdom. The national program being operated under the title, “My Environment is My Responsibility,” will run until March 11.
The scouting organization’s commissioner for service and community development, Ahmed Al-Asiri, said that in cooperation with relevant sectors the association wanted to promote the values of belonging, responsibility, positivity, working together, love for others, volunteering, and hygiene.


Saudi ministry closes 366 shops in virus crackdown

Saudi ministry closes 366 shops in virus crackdown
Updated 05 March 2021

Saudi ministry closes 366 shops in virus crackdown

Saudi ministry closes 366 shops in virus crackdown

RIYADH: The Saudi Ministry of Municipal, Rural Affairs and Housing has closed 366 establishments in the Kingdom that violated precautionary health measures to limit the spread of coronavirus.
The ministry said that field teams in various regions and governorates of the Kingdom carried out 24,066 inspection tours of shops, food establishments and public utility markets.
Inspections resulted in the detection of 1,226 violations of health measures issued by the ministry and relevant public health authorities as part of the Kingdom’s anti-coronavirus efforts. The ministry said that municipalities had shut 366 establishments, and applied penalties according to regulations.


KSrelief inspects empowerment project in Yemen

KSrelief inspects empowerment project in Yemen
Updated 05 March 2021

KSrelief inspects empowerment project in Yemen

KSrelief inspects empowerment project in Yemen

ADEN: The King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSrelief), in collaboration with the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), inspected the progress of the project to provide emergency services to women and girls affected by gender-based violence in Yemen.
This project is managed by KSrelief in the governorates of Aden, Lahj, Taiz, Marib, Al-Mahra, and Shabwa.
The project aims to strengthen the mechanisms of protecting women and girls from gender-based violence, and boost the capabilities of victims through professional and vocational training programs, to secure a fixed source of income for women that helps to reintegrate them into society.