Saudi Aramco’s Amin Nasser warms the night in glittering Davos reception

Saudi Aramco CEO Amin Nasser thanked guests for their continuing collaboration with the company at a function in the InterContinental hotel, in Davos. (Courtesy WEF)
Updated 25 January 2019

Saudi Aramco’s Amin Nasser warms the night in glittering Davos reception

  • The world’s biggest oil company greeted political and business leaders at the InterContinental hotel
  • The guests included ministers and oil executives from Saudi Arabia and top business executives and financiers from around the world

DAVOS: Saudi Aramco welcomed a delegation of the global elite to a reception at the World Economic Forum which, even by the glittering standards of Davos, was a sumptuous affair.

Hosted by CEO Amin Nasser, the world’s biggest oil company greeted political and business leaders at the InterContinental hotel, a short drive through the ice night from the main Congress Hall venue.

Though the temperature outside was well below zero, the hospitality in the cavernous reception hall was warm. The guests — including ministers and oil executives from Saudi Arabia and top business executives and financiers from around the world — were treated to a selection of gourmet canapés and refreshments, and all seemed to be enjoying the convivial atmosphere.

Joe Kaeser, chief executive of the German engineering giant Siemens, said: “This is a pleasant break from the back-to-back business meetings of Davos.” His company is in the running for some of the big contracts on prospect in the mega-projects underway in the Kingdom as part of the Vision 2030 diversification strategy.

The guests were treated to an extravagant visual exhibition of the Manifa oilfield off the Saudi Arabian Gulf coast, which has been praised throughout the world for its innovative approach to combining oil exploration with environmental concern.

During its annual meeting the World Economic Forum recognized another Aramco project, the Uthmaniyah gas plant, as a “lighthouse” manufacturing facility and a technology leader in the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR).

Nasser said: “The recognition of the Uthmaniyah Gas Plant demonstrates Saudi Aramco’s shift to transform and adapt in the rapidly changing global energy landscape. Through the application of 4IR technologies, we can be at the forefront of the industry helping to shape the future of energy as part of Saudi Aramco’s mission to supply oil and gas around the world safely and reliably.”

In a short speech, Nasser thanked the guests for their continuing collaboration with Aramco, before handing over to Saudi musicians, including Madani Abadi on strings.

He revealed that Abadi was a former Aramco employee, and joked: “He used to work for us, but now he has a much better job.”


Oil prices rise as faith in supply cuts grows

Updated 26 May 2020

Oil prices rise as faith in supply cuts grows

  • Producers are following through on commitments to cut supplies as fuel demand picks up with coronavirus restrictions easing
  • OPEC+ countries are due to meet again in early June to discuss maintaining their supply cuts to shore up prices

NEW YORK: Oil prices rose on Tuesday, supported by growing confidence that producers are following through on commitments to cut supplies and as fuel demand picks up with coronavirus restrictions easing.
Brent crude futures were up 45 cents, or 1.3%, at $35.98 a barrel by 1:09 p.m. EDT (1709 GMT). US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures gained 89 cents, or 2.7%, to $34.14.
The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and other leading oil producers including Russia, a group known as OPEC+, agreed last month to cut their combined output by almost 10 million barrels per day in May-June to shore up prices and demand, which has been hit by the coronavirus pandemic.
Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak is due to meet oil major producers on Tuesday to discuss the possible extension of the current level of cuts beyond June, sources familiar with the plans told Reuters.
The RIA news agency said Russian oil production volumes were near the country’s target of 8.5 million bpd for May and June.
On Monday, Russia’s energy ministry quoted Novak as saying that a rise in fuel demand should help to cut a global surplus of about 7 million to 12 million bpd by June or July.
OPEC+ countries are due to meet again in early June to discuss maintaining their supply cuts to shore up prices, which are still down about 45% since the start of the year.
“The 16 million bpd oversupply in crude during April could be reversed altogether by June, helped by a 4 million-bpd recovery in crude demand and a 12 million-bpd cut in crude supply,” said Bjornar Tonhaugen, head of oil markets for Rystad Energy.
“OPEC+ is pulling the most weight by far, effectively reducing supply by nearly 9 million bpd while non-OPEC+ crude supply is down by more than 3.5 million bpd from March levels.”
In an indication of lower supply in the future, data from energy services business Baker Hughes showed that the US rig count hit a record low of 318 last week.