Arab coalition raid kills Houthi commander in Yemen’s Hajjah

Houthi fighter inspect the damage after an air strike carried out by the Saudi-led coalition on December 5, 2017. (File/AFP)
Updated 01 February 2019

Arab coalition raid kills Houthi commander in Yemen’s Hajjah

  • Houthi commander Abdullah Jahaf was killed by a Saudi-led Arab coalition air raid
  • Houthi weapon stores were also destroyed on Thursday evening east of Yemen’s capital Sanaa

Houthi commander Abdullah Jahaf was killed by a Saudi-led Arab coalition air raid in the northwestern province of Hajjah, Al Arabiya reported on Friday.
Houthi weapon stores were also destroyed on Thursday evening east of Yemen’s capital Sanaa, the coalition’s spokesman also said.
The operation was an extension of the military operation carried out by the coalition forces earlier this month to target and destroy drone manufacturing site belonging to the Iranian-backed Houthi militia.
The coalition stressed that the operation was consistent with international law and preventive measures were taken to protect civilians and spare them collateral damage.
Meanwhile, the Yemeni army liberated strategic areas on the Kataf fronts of Saada province, a Houthi strong-hold.
Sources told Yemen’s news agency that the liberation of these areas came after heavy clashes against the militia, which resulted in the death of two commanders and the capture of three others.


Macron slams Turkey’s aggression in Syria as ‘madness’, bewails NATO inaction

Updated 19 October 2019

Macron slams Turkey’s aggression in Syria as ‘madness’, bewails NATO inaction

  • EU Council President Donald Tusk said the halt of Turkish hostilities as demanded by the US is not a genuine cease-fire
  • He calls on Ankara to immediately stop military operations,

BRUSSELS/ANKARA: Macron critizes Turkey's aggression in Syria as "madness', bewails NATO inaction

France’s President Emmanuel Macron has bemoaned Turkey’s offensive into northern Syria as “madness” and decried NATO’s inability to react to the assault as a “serious mistake.”

“It weakens our credibility in finding partners on the ground who will be by our side and who think they will be protected in the long term. So that raises questions about how NATO functions.”

EU Council President Donald Tusk said the halt of Turkish hostilities is not a genuine cease-fire and called on Ankara to immediately stop military operations in Syria.

Dareen Khalifa, a senior Syria analyst at the International Crisis Group, said the cease-fire had unclear goals. 

There was no mention of the scope of the area that would be under Turkish control and, despite US Vice President Mike Pence referring to a 20-mile zone, the length of the zone remains ambiguous, she said.

Selim Sazak, a doctoral researcher at Brown University, believed the agreement would be implemented and the YPG would withdraw.

“The agency of the YPG is fairly limited. If the deal collapses because of the YPG, it’s actually all the better for Ankara,” he told Arab News. “What Ankara originally wanted was to take all of the belt into its control and eliminate as many of the YPG forces as possible. Instead, the YPG is withdrawing with a portion of its forces and its territory intact. Had the deal collapsed because of the YPG, Ankara would have reason to push forward, this time with much more legitimacy.”