These Pakistani women artists are using social media to #LeadChange

These Pakistani women artists are using social media to #LeadChange
Updated 13 March 2019

These Pakistani women artists are using social media to #LeadChange

These Pakistani women artists are using social media to #LeadChange

ISLAMABAD: In the past few years, social media, particularly Instagram, has emerged as the social media platform of choice for many contemporary Pakistani women artists who use it to promote their art and create a space for a meaningful exchange of dialogue and ideas about women’s rights and issues. Here are some Pakistani women artists and designers to follow on Instagram for their creativity as much as their activism on and offline.
SHEHZIL MALIK




Shehzil Malik shared a photo after plastering a large scale poster of 1 of the 3 original artworks she created for Aurat March 2019 in Lahore. (Photo courtesy: Shehzil Malik/Instagram)




In collaboration with Nigat Dad of Digital Rights Foundation, Malik created this original piece for a new web portal Dad's organisation was launching to make reporting harassment in the digital sphere easier for women. (Photo courtesy: Shehzil Malik/Instagram)




Inspired by Meesha Shafi's 'Me Too' story and the subsequent harassment Shafi faced, Malik created a portrait of the singer which was later used as the backdrop of Shafi's performance on 'Pepsi Battle of the Bands'. (Photo courtesy: Shehzil Malik/Instagram)




'Women in Public Spaces,' one of Malik's comics she drew in 2015 reflecting her experience as a woman occupying public space in Pakistan. (Photo courtesy: Shehzil Malik/Instagram)


Did you see the Aurat March posters plastered around Lahore? That was the genius of Shehzil Malik. In 2015, Malik drew a viral comic inspired by her experience as a woman in public spaces in Pakistan, which gained her a large following. Her graphic, high-color saturated pieces have since captured the public imagination. Malik has also launched a fashion line with a feminist bent and her drawing of Meesha Shafi was used as stage art atPepsi Battle of the Bands.
SAMYA ARIF




Samya Arif was commissioned to create art work for Pakistani rock Sufi band Junoon for their reunion concert in December of last year. (Photo courtesy: Samya Arif/Instagram)




Arif's second book cover was for Sabyn Javeri's collection of short stories 'Hijabistan,' the chosen cover was Arif's piece titled 'Cosmic Ninja'. (Photo courtesy: Samya Arif/Instagram)




Arif's piece aiming to depict a powerful and hopeful image of the future for women. (Photo courtesy: Samya Arif/Instagram)




Arif's piece aiming to depict a powerful and hopeful image of the future for women. (Photo courtesy: Samya Arif/Instagram)
Cover art for Nadia Akbar's 'Goodbye Freddie Mercury'. (Photo courtesy: Samya Arif/Instagram)

Karachi-based Samya Arif’s list of clients and collaborators reads like a drool-inducing menu of the who’s who of the Pakistani music scene: Junoon, Mooroo and the Mekaal Hasan Band, that small unknown indie band by the name of Coldplay, as well as mega brands like Coke Studio, Al Jazeera and Magnum. Arif, who teaches part time at her alma mater the Indus Valley School of Art & Architecture uses visual art and illustration to make eye catching designs such as the cover arts of novels ‘Hijabistan’ and ‘Goodbye Freddie Mercury,’ and to celebrate womanhood.
MALIHA ABIDI




Cover of Maliha Abidi's book 'Pakistan for Women' a collection of illustrations by Abidi depicting 50 of Pakistan's most iconic women. (Photo courtesy: Maliha Abidi/Instagram) 




Inspired by UN Women's 'end Dowry abuse' campaign, Abidi created this illustration with a bride's jewellery strewn with the word 'dowry'. (Photo courtesy: Maliha Abidi/Instagram)




The late Asma Jehangir is one of the many women Abidi has illustrated and whose story she has included in her book 'Pakistan for Women'. (Photo courtesy: Maliha Abidi/Instagram)




An in process shot of a painting of Madam Noor Jehan, one of Pakistan's most revered singers. (Photo courtesy: Maliha Abidi/Instagram)


Maliha Abidi paints colorful and arresting portraits celebrating Pakistan’s women icons. Based in the UK, Abidi compiled her illustrations, such as those of the late Asma Jehangir, Noor Jehan, Nazia Hassan, Malala Yousafzai and Pakistan’s first female firefighter Shazia Parveen, into a book called ‘Pakistan for Women’ showcasing 50 Pakistanis who have contributed to the fabric of the nation. Abidi has also used her work to highlight women’s issues like dowry abuse, domestic violence and child marriage.
AREEBA SIDDIQUE




An illustration of a girl's wall including a poster of a girl with the words "Girls Just Wanna Have Their Revenge Mostly". (Photo courtesy: Areeba Siddique/Instagram)




A portrait Areeba Siddique made of her mom. (Photo courtesy: Areeba Siddique/Instagram)




Siddique's illustrations are clever commentary on life for some girls in Pakistan with strict parents and a lifestyle mix of both the traditional and contemporary. (Photo courtesy: Areeba Siddique/Instagram)




Siddique illustrates women getting ready for a wedding. (Photo courtesy: Areeba Siddique/Instagram)

Areeba Siddique’s drawings on her Instagram page have the most clever detailing: A cell phone lit up with texts from mom next to fingers applying the words “Follow me on Instagram” in henna on another person; inside the intricate pattern of the mehndi design is this sentence: “no more boys name in our henna. ONLY INSTAGRAM USER NAMES.’ With nearly 67,000 followers, Karachi’s Siddique shares not only her feminist artwork and illustrations depicting the delightfully mundane happenings in the lives of mostly hijab-clad women but also presents glimpses of her own personal style and design process. She most recently collaborated with a homeware line that put her artwork on mugs and dishes.
FATIMA BAIG




A take on 'Rosie the Riveter' Fatima Baig's work focusses on portraying South Asian beauty and strength. (Photo courtesy: Fatima Baig/Instagram)




A common theme in Baig's work is the relationship between women and spirituality showcased with the inclusion of cosmic elements like the moon and stars in her pieces. (Photo courtesy: Fatima Baig/Instagram)




Similar to many of the contemporary artists listed here, Baig is using her talent to share shine on Brown women and their many reiterations. (Photo courtesy: Fatima Baig/Instagram)




A portrait of living legend Sufi-Qawal master, Abida Parveen by Fatima Baig. (Photo courtesy: Fatima Baig/Instagram)


The beauty of the body, of diversity and of spirituality are the main stays in the art created by Fatima Baig. A native of Rawalpindi, she creates power-packed, color-saturated images depicting strong women of diverse backgrounds, ethnicities, skin tones and body sizes. There are recognizable shout outs in her work to regional dress, jewelry, people (including her portrait of Abida Parveen) and a playful approach to incorporating the cosmos and the connection between women and the spirit. 
MAHOOR JAMAL




In a unique take on fashion editorials, Jamal used illustrations atop of fashion photography for this spread. (Photo courtesy: Mahoor Jamal/Instagram)




South Asian women presented in unexpected ways is a common theme in Jamal's work, like this painting with a renaissance vibe but Pakistani aesthetics in the subjects clothing and features. (Photo courtesy: Mahoor Jamal/Instagram)




Dark skin, dark hair, South Asian shapes and sizes are prominent features of Jamal's work, like this illustration she posted on Eid with the caption, 'Eid Mubarak'. (Photo courtesy: Mahoor Jamal/Instagram)




Mixing the elements of fashion photography with her gift of illustration. (Photo courtesy: Mahoor Jamal/Instagram)

Combining the worlds of illustration, design and photography Mahoor Jamal has become a person to watch in both the art and fashion worlds. With a unique approach to artistry Jamal has worked with fashion campaigns and editorials in both photography and text. Her work depicts women both realistic and fantastical, incorporating desi aesthetics like jewelry and clothing with breathtaking control.
HAFSA KHAN




Pop art like that made popular by Andy Warhol has been reimagined with a Pakistani twist by artist Hafsa Khan. (Photo courtesy: Hafsa Khan/Instagram)




Khan contrasts current happenings (like pizza) against classic South Asian ones (like a background of henna motifs) to create graphic pieces that play around with identity. (Photo courtesy: Hafsa Khan/Instagram)




Khan includes lots of jewellery in her pieces as a part of South Asian identity and in particular to show the regality of South Asian women. (Photo courtesy: Hafsa Khan/Instagram)

 




Titled 'Louis Vuitton Khan,' Khan shares on her Instagram projects which are painted or drawn on designer boxes and utilizing popular high end designer prints like this one. (Photo courtesy: Hafsa Khan/Instagram)

US-based Hafsa Khan has grown a strong following across social media for capturing the beauty of South Asian women, drawn in pop art. When talking about her work on her website Khan said, “I want you to notice the regality of the women.” Hands wearing mehndi and decked out in rings and bangles, nose rings and teekas, and traditional dresses skilfully reimagine the classic pop art graphics of yesteryear and merge them with South Asian aesthetics. The images of brown skinned women and their hands contrast against neon pops of colors, bold backgrounds and even at times designer logos leave a lasting impression.


FM Qureshi, US Secretary discuss Daniel Pearl Case

FM Qureshi, US Secretary discuss Daniel Pearl Case
Updated 30 January 2021

FM Qureshi, US Secretary discuss Daniel Pearl Case

FM Qureshi, US Secretary discuss Daniel Pearl Case
  • The Pakistani foreign minister says his country wants economic partnership, regional connectivity
  • The two officials discuss Afghanistan, other areas of bilateral interest during a phone call on Friday

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi told US Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken on Friday it was important and in the mutual interest of the two countries that justice was served in the Daniel Pearl case through legal means. 

According to an official handout circulated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Islamabad, Qureshi had a telephone conversation with the American official in which he congratulated the new US state secretary on assuming his office and highlighted the steps the government had taken in the kidnapping and murder case of the Wall Street Journal reporter. 

The foreign minister told the American official that Prime Minister Imran Khan was pursuing a new vision for his country that placed premium on forging economic partnership, building a peaceful neighborhood, and enhancing regional connectivity. 

He also underscored Pakistan’s commitment to a comprehensive partnership with the United States based on convergence of interests on a wide range of issues. 

“Foreign Minister Qureshi told Secretary Blinken that peace in Afghanistan through a negotiated political settlement was one of the fundamental convergences between the two countries,” the official handout said. “It was essential to have reduction in violence leading to ceasefire and to work towards securing an inclusive political solution in Afghanistan. Pakistan had facilitated the Afghan peace process and remained committed to working with the United States as a partner for peace.” 

The foreign ministry’s statement added that Secretary Blinken recalled US-Pakistan cooperation over the years and noted that the two countries had a range of areas to engage on. He also acknowledged the sacrifices of the people of Pakistan in the fight against terrorism. 

The two officials agreed to remain engaged and work together on advancing their bilateral agenda and promoting common interests in the region and beyond. 


'No food left in the sea': Pakistani fishermen fearful as Chinese trawlers dock at Karachi port 

'No food left in the sea': Pakistani fishermen fearful as Chinese trawlers dock at Karachi port 
Updated 19 October 2020

'No food left in the sea': Pakistani fishermen fearful as Chinese trawlers dock at Karachi port 

'No food left in the sea': Pakistani fishermen fearful as Chinese trawlers dock at Karachi port 
  • Fisherfolk forum says government plan to allow Chinese to carry out deep-sea fishing in territorial waters could render millions jobless 
  • Federal government says bottom trawling will not be allowed under new fishing policy

KARACHI: A pressure group that represents Pakistani fishermen has said a government plan to allow Chinese companies to carry out deep-sea fishing in the country’s territorial waters could threaten the survival of at least three million people who depend on the sea for livelihood.
Last month, 12 Chinese deep-sea trawlers docked at the port of Karachi, unleashing fear among local fishermen who say commercial fishing vessels and bottom-trawling would deplete fish stocks in the exclusive federal sea zones off the Sindh and Balochistan provinces. 
Bottom trawling - dragging nets across the sea floor to scoop up fish - stirs up the sediment lying on the seabed, displaces or harms some marine species, causes pollutants to mix into plankton and move into the food chain and creates harmful algae blooms or oxygen-deficient dead zones.
The coastal line of Sindh and Balochistan is 1,050 km long, Mohammad Ali Shah, Chairman Pakistan Fisherfolk Forum, told Arab News last week, saying around three million fishermen relied on the sea to survive. 
A new fishing policy is expected but yet to be revealed by the government, he said. 
“The deep-sea trawler policy has not yet been approved but before that they [China] have brought these trawlers,” Shah said, calling the arrival of the Chinese vessels at Karachi port last month ‘illegal.’ 

In this undated photo, fishing vessels of Fujian Fishery Company move from the Gwadar port towards Karachi, Pakistan (Photo courtesy: Fishermen Cooperatives Society)

In 2018, the government enacted a deep-sea fishing licensing policy that both fishermen's representative bodies and provincial government bodies opposed, calling it a constitutional violation and an encroachment on the livelihoods of fishermen in the coastal provinces.
Fears about foreign fishing companies eating up local communities are not new.
For years, fishermen in the southwestern city of Gwadar in Balochistan province - a flagship of the $60 billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor - have protested against foreign trawlers. 
Tensions first began to mount when the Fisheries Department disclosed its plan to issue licenses to various foreign fishing vessels to operate in an exclusive economic zone in 2016.
But last week, the federal minister for maritime affairs, Ali Haider Zaidi, told Arab News the country’s new deep-sea fishing policy would not allow Chinese trawlers to engage in unregulated deep-sea fishing. Bottom trawling, he said, would be banned under the new policy.
“Importing boats is not illegal,” he said. “How you use them has to be regulated.”
Pakistan divides its sea into three zones, where zone-3 (from 20 to 200 nautical miles) is controlled by the federal government. Up to 12 nautical miles (zone-1) is the domain of the provinces Sindh and Balochistan and between 12 to 20 nautical miles the sea is declared a buffer zone. 

Fishermen remove fish from a net at the Clifton beach in Pakistan's port city of Karachi on Oct. 6, 2020. (AFP/File)

Local fishermen are not allowed to fish in zone-3 and foreign fishing vessels are not permitted to fish in the other two zones under the existing policy.
The Fishermen's Cooperative Society (FCS), which issued the permit to the Chinese trawlers, said the Chinese fishing vessels would not use the destructive bottom trawling method and instead help ‘upgrade’ Pakistan’s fishing industry and export.
Official figures put the annual value of Pakistan’s fish exports at roughly $450 million.
“Bringing Chinese trawlers for deep sea fishing is in line with the government’s deep-sea fishing policy and aimed at upgrading and modernizing fishing, besides providing job opportunities to local fishermen,” Abdul Berr, Chairman of the Fishermen's Cooperative Society, told Arab News.
“Around 3,500 fishermen will get employment opportunities with the arrival of the world’s latest fishing boats and modern small boats,” Berr said. 
He added: “First, 70 percent of the staff at trawlers and processing facilities will be local. There will be no fishing in provincial territorial waters. The trawlers will bring all their catch to Karachi where it will be processed in factories and then exported.”
Small local fishermen would receive modern fiber boats on ‘easy instalments,’ Berr said, a step towards replacing their obsolete boats.
But Sindh’s minister for livestock and fisheries, Abdul Bari Pitafi, said the mega fishing ships would wipe out sea-life, even if they were only operating in the federal government’s zone-3.
“We will...also oppose its [trawlers’] operations in zone-3 because they will just wipe out sea-life including the fish’s seed,” Pitafi told Arab News.
In 2016, a survey carried out by the Food and Agriculture Organisation revealed that more than 72 percent of the fish stock in Pakistan’s coastal areas had already declined.
“One trawler does a catch that is equal to a catch by 100 of our fishing boats,” Younus Khaskheli, a fisherman, said. “And their fishing net is the most dangerous one, because it hunts thousands of tons of fish.” 
Tens of thousands of fishing boats are registered in Pakistan, he said, with fishermen from Sindh, Balochistan, Punjab, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and even Bangladesh fishing in these waters.
“Our sea stock will end; the country will lose the income of billions and our fishermen will become jobless,” Khaskheli said. “There won’t be any food left in the sea.” 


Pakistan rejects 'baseless' Armenia claims

Pakistan rejects 'baseless' Armenia claims
Updated 17 October 2020

Pakistan rejects 'baseless' Armenia claims

Pakistan rejects 'baseless' Armenia claims
  • Reiterates to "stand by the brotherly nation of Azerbaijan"
  • Nagorno-Karabakh is internationally recognized as part of Azerbaijan but populated and governed by ethnic Armenians

LONDON: Pakistan has denied its involvement in the ongoing Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict, following a claim by the Armenian prime minister that Pakistani troops were fighting alongside Azerbaijani troops.

In an official statement released on Saturday, the Pakistani foreign office said it regretted Armenia’s decision to resort to “irresponsible propaganda” and that it would continue to “stand by the brotherly nation of Azerbaijan.”

The defense ministry of the Nagorno-Karabakh region said on Friday it had recorded another 29 casualties among its military, pushing the military death toll to 633 since fighting with Azeri forces erupted on Sept. 27.

The fighting has surged to its worst level since the 1990s, when some 30,000 people were killed.

Also on Friday, there were growing signs that a Russian-brokered cease-fire agreed upon last week to allow sides to swap detainees and bodies of those killed had all but broken down.

Nagorno-Karabakh is internationally recognized as part of Azerbaijan but populated and governed by ethnic Armenians.

Read the Pakistani statement in full below…

We have seen the transcript of Armenian prime minister’s interview on Oct. 15 with Russian TV referring to some unsubstantiated reports alleging involvement of Pakistani special forces alongside the Azerbaijani army in the ongoing conflict.

We categorically reject these baseless and unwarranted comments. President Ilham Aliyev of Azerbaijan has also clarified his stance on the matter stating that Azerbaijani forces are strong enough to defend their homeland and do not need the help of foreign forces.

It is regrettable that leadership of Armenia, to cover up its illegal actions against Azerbaijan, is resorting to irresponsible propaganda, which it must stop.

For our part, we wish to make clear that Pakistan has consistently extended diplomatic, moral and political support to Azerbaijan. Pakistan will continue to stand by the brotherly nation of Azerbaijan and support its right of self-defence against any aggression.

We believe that long-term peace and normalization of relations between the two parties would depend on the complete and comprehensive implementation of the UN Security Council resolutions and withdrawal of Armenian forces from Azerbaijani territories.