‘Qatar Papers’ book reveals Doha’s lavish funding for Muslim Brotherhood in Europe

The book publishes evidence of cheque and money transfers from Qatar that have been used to underwrite Brotherhood-linked projects around Europe. (Supplied)
Updated 18 April 2019
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‘Qatar Papers’ book reveals Doha’s lavish funding for Muslim Brotherhood in Europe

  • The book’s introduction says it unveils 140 documents “for the first time” that detail Qatar's funding of Brotherhood-linked figures, entities
  • It documents payments of €72 million ($80.8 million) to Brotherhood groups that are active in seven European countries

LONDON: A book recently published by two French journalists claims to reveal the details of lavish payments made by Qatar to Muslim Brotherhood organizations across Europe.

The 295-page book titled “Qatar Papers - How the State Finances Islam in France and Europe” is reportedly based on official documents and testimonies that shed light on Doha’s extensive funding to promote the Brotherhood’s ideology on the continent. 

Written by French investigative reporters Georges Malbrunot and Christian Chesnot, the book publishes evidence of cheque and money transfers from Qatar that have been used to underwrite Brotherhood-linked projects around Europe.

The book’s introduction says it unveils 140 documents “for the first time” that detail Qatar's funding of dozens of mosques and Islamic societies to promote the influence of the Brotherhood in European countries like France and Switzerland — documenting payments of €72 million ($80.8 million) to Brotherhood groups that are active in seven European countries. 

In France, the focus was on the northern city of Lille and the south-west city of Bordeaux. The documents reveal that a state-run Qatar charity funded several Islamic centers and schools in those regions.

It also shed light on the case of controversial Islamist thinker Tariq Ramadan, mentioning Qatari funds used for legal fees to fight rape allegations against him. The well-known Brotherhood figure, who spent eight months in jail over rape allegations, is cited in the book to have received €35,000 a month from the Qatar Foundation. 

Just before his arrest early last year, bank documents show that Ramadan withdrew €590,000 from Qatari bank accounts.

The book also reveals that institutions such as Mucivi and Le Musée des Civilisations de l’Islam — a museum in Geneva that displays Brotherhood propaganda — were financed by Qatar. It said the body has received CHF1.4 million ($1.5 million) in funding from Qatar. 

The book also cites documents found in the house of Youssef Nada, a former prominent Brotherhood leader, revealing his intention to set out a strategy for using mayors and other local bodies as tools of influence to promote the group’s ideology. 

The book also highlighted French intelligence warnings about Qatari support for the L'Union des Organisations Islamiques de France, an umbrella body in France.


8 caught after Baghdad breakout from police: ministry

Updated 04 August 2019

8 caught after Baghdad breakout from police: ministry

  • The 15 suspected members of a drug trafficking network escaped custody on Saturday
  • The interior ministry said eight had been recaptured

BAGHDAD: Eight out of 15 drug trafficking suspects have been recaptured after escaping custody in a Baghdad police station, Iraq’s interior ministry said, as the breakout prompted several dismissals.
“The search continues to find the others,” a police officer said, on condition of anonymity.
The 15 suspected members of a drug trafficking network escaped custody on Saturday, after having “insulted the police, then beaten them,” according to a security services official.
The interior ministry said eight had been recaptured without specifying where they were being held.
Baghdad’s police chief and the heads of Al-Russafa police department in the capital’s east and the station where the suspects pulled off their escape have all been fired, the ministry said.
On social media, images of videosurveillance purported to be from the police station shows men in civilian clothing running through a door, apparently without any resistance.
No one in uniform is visible in the footage.
Prison security is a critical issue in Iraq, where escapes are not uncommon, whether by violence or bribery.
Iraq is the 12th most corrupt country in the world, according to Transparency International, and experts have pointed to high levels of corruption in its prisons.
During the insurrection and sectarian violence that followed the 2003 US-led invasion, hundreds of militants were able to escape from prison.
Iraq is currently seeking to try thousands of local and foreign jihadists, while keeping them in overcrowded prisons.
Many prisons have been rendered unusable by repeated conflicts.
The sale and use of drugs have been booming in Iraq. Authorities regularly announce the seizure of narcotics and the arrest of traffickers, particularly along the border with Iran.