REVIEW: Iftar and a movie at Cinemajlis in Dubai

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Iftar at Dubai's Cinema Akil. (Supplied)
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Iftar at Dubai's Cinema Akil. (Supplied)
Updated 05 June 2019

REVIEW: Iftar and a movie at Cinemajlis in Dubai

  • Indie movie theater Cinema Akil offers iftar with a twist
  • Alserkal Avenue’s Cinema Akil and Project Chaiwala have partnered for this specially curated 30-day experience

DUBAI: As soon as I enter the grand hall of Cinemajlis, I am given a wristband to wear, before being greeted by a chaiwala who offers me a cup of steaming hot masala chai. It’s certainly not your typical iftar setting, but it’s offerings like these that have added much-needed variety to the Ramadan culinary scene in the UAE.

Alserkal Avenue’s Cinema Akil and Project Chaiwala have partnered for this specially curated 30-day experience, with Cinemajlis doing exactly what it says on the tin: it’s an iftar in a majlis-style setting, paired with a post-meal movie screening.

An independent arthouse theater, Cinema Akil was launched in 2014, and has since screened a multitude of independent and festival films via one-off pop-ups around Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Sharjah, and at its main venue. Project Chaiwala, meanwhile, also started as a pop-up concept, in 2017. Two years later, it opened its flagship store sharing a space with Cinema Akil.

It’s clear that the talents behind both brands have put a lot of effort into Cinemajlis. Understated, yet fastidious in design, the hall has been transformed from regular cinema to — you guessed it — a majlis with floor cushions around the tables. The venue’s regular interiors, featuring traditional Indian stencil design on the walls, mix well with the additions and tweaks made for the Holy Month.

Mainstays like the classic prints and posters dotted around — including one for the original “Star Wars” film, and a black-and-white photograph of a young Sherihan (one of the Arab world’s best-known performers) — complement the classic 'Khayamiya' used for the majlis. This beautifully designed textile, a type of decorative appliqué material historically used to decorate tents across the Middle East, evokes memories of North Africa and the Levant in the Nineties, a simpler time when ‘fawazeer’ was in vogue.

The menu, created by Project Chaiwala, is bona fide, family-style, South Asian cuisine, featuring dishes that are the epitome of comfort food. There are samosas, soup, naan bread, Chicken Karahi, vegetable pulao and more. A personal highlight was the rich, creamy and buttery Dal Makhani. Simply put, it was glorious, with just the right amount of spice.

Displaying energetic elan, the team from the kitchen were always on hand to check in on diners, before distributing dessert, which was saffron cake with ice-cream.

As iftar wrapped up, guests were encouraged to take to the actual cinema seats to watch the movie. The night’s screening was “Naila and the Uprising,” a documentary that chronicles the real-life journey of Naila Ayesh, a key figure in the First Intifada. Cinema Akil has chosen four films to screen during Cinemajlis, with a new one starting every Friday for a week. Also on the schedule are 2017 Iraqi drama “The Journey,” and “Ext. Night,” the acclaimed Egyptian drama which screened at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival.

While my trip to Cinemajlis was thanks to an invite, the experience left such an impression that I intend to return before the Holy Month ends. At AED200 ($54.45) per head for a light and delightful meal, and a film screening, it is such good value for money. And the fact that it’s the creation of two homegrown concepts makes it all the more special. To reserve your table, you need to book and pay online in advance, but you won’t regret it. The only thing you’ll regret is not having tried it sooner.


UAE’s ‘New National Dish’ exhibition offers a taste of the future

The exhibition is on show in Dubai on Jan. 24 and 25. (Supplied)
Updated 22 January 2020

UAE’s ‘New National Dish’ exhibition offers a taste of the future

  • The show presents four imagined proposals for a new Emirati national dish, based on the environmental, economic and social impacts of climate change

DUBAI: Future food scenarios are imagined in “New National Dish: UAE,” an exhibition at AlSerkal Avenue in Dubai open January 24 and 25.

The show presents four imagined proposals for a new Emirati national dish, based on the environmental, economic and social impacts of climate change.

Zac Denfeld, director of the Center for Genomic Gastronomy — the artist-led think tank behind the show, which has previously examined the biotechnologies and biodiversity of human food systems in Ireland — spoke to Arab News about the exhibition, which follows similar shows in Poland and Norway.

“We do some research and look at the way food might change, and then propose a new national dish,” Denfeld, who is currently based in Norway, said. “The UAE has a strong desire for food security and there are many scientific projects happening here, (including) indoor growing, vertical growing using somewhat salty water.”

Visitors to the exhibition will get to try the food and discuss the future of popular dishes. (Supplied)

For the Dubai show, produced by AlSerkal, Denfeld and his colleagues concentrated on identifying Emirati food for which most of the ingredients are grown in the country.

“We are also considering the changing preferences for the eaters; what they are going to want in the future,” Denfeld explained. For example, the team imagined and created a new kind of sushi, replacing the fish meat with watermelon prepared with a seaweed machine to make the fruit taste and feel like fish.

“That’s also combined over rice, like sushi, because the UAE is now working with China to develop a rice that can grow in the salty conditions,” Denfeld said. “So, this is a way of combining a future where rice is actually grown (in the Emirates) — which has never been done — and an alternative approach to fish, where we might eat a little bit less fish or only have the (selected) parts.”

Visitors to the exhibition will get to try the food and discuss the future of popular dishes. “That’s really interesting for us,” said Denfield. “Because we are not really saying, ‘Okay, this is the future. This is what you should do.’ We are giving four very different perspectives, and people can choose what their favorite is.”