Does the new Miss Philippines have Arab roots?

Miss Philippines 2019 Gazini Ganados is now eligible to compete in the Miss Universe pageant. (Instagram)
Updated 10 June 2019

Does the new Miss Philippines have Arab roots?

  • Local media reported her as of Palestinian descent
  • There are no exact details of her ancestry

The Philippines crowned its newest beauty queen on Sunday night and media reports in the country are hinting that she may have Palestinian roots.

Miss Philippines 2019 Gazini Ganados is now eligible to compete in the Miss Universe pageant and is reported to have been born to a Filipino mother and a Palestinian father, according to local media.

Ganados was crowned during the Binibining Pilipinas 2019 ceremony, a national beauty pageant watched by thousands.

There are no exact details of her ancestry, but in a recent interview she said she grew up with her single mother and her grandparents.

Gazini is not new to beauty contests – she has competed in regional pageants and the Miss World Philippines contest in 2014.

The 23-year-old model has big shoes to fill — she succeeds Catriona Gray, who famously nabbed the Miss Universe title in 2018.


Sheep take over streets of Madrid for annual migration

Updated 20 October 2019

Sheep take over streets of Madrid for annual migration

  • The annual event, which started in 1994, allows shepherds to exercise their right to use traditional routes to migrate their livestock
  • The herd includes 2,000 merino sheep and 100 goats

MADRID: Sheep replaced traffic on the streets of Madrid on Sunday as shepherds steered their flocks through the heart of the Spanish capital, following ancient migration routes.
The annual event, which started in 1994, allows shepherds to exercise their right to use traditional routes to migrate their livestock from northern Spain to more southerly pastures for winter grazing.
The route would have taken them through undeveloped countryside a few centuries ago, but today it cuts through Madrid’s bustling city center and along some of its most famous streets.
Sheep farmers pay a nominal charge in symbolic acknowledgement of a 1418 agreement with the city council that set a fee of 50 maravedis — medieval coins — per 1,000 sheep brought through the central Sol square and Gran Via street.
The herd includes 2,000 merino sheep and 100 goats.