Arab coalition highlights humanitarian efforts in Yemen

Arab Coalition Spokesman Col. Turki Al-Maliki speaks at a press conference in Riyadh. (File photo/SPA)
Updated 10 June 2019

Arab coalition highlights humanitarian efforts in Yemen

  • The coalition is working to end the Houthi coup and restore Yemen’s legitimate government
  • Cited launch of air bridge from Riyadh to Aden to provide emergency relief for those affected by floods

RIYADH: The Arab coalition supporting Yemen’s internationally recognized government conducts humanitarian work as well as military operations, its spokesman said on Monday.

Turki Al-Maliki cited the launch of an air bridge from Riyadh to Aden to provide emergency relief for those affected by floods in Yemen.

The coalition has been carrying out humanitarian work since the start of its military operations in Yemen, he said.

The coalition helped a crew member of the Iranian ship Savis for medical reasons after Saudi Arabia received a request for help from Iran, Al-Maliki added.

He offered a video of the rescue of the crew member, who received medical treatment and was transported by helicopter to a military hospital in Jizan near the Saudi-Yemeni border.

The coalition is working to end the Houthi coup and restore Yemen’s legitimate government by trying to find common ground for all political parties to resolve the crisis, Al-Maliki said.

“The Iranian regime is working to undermine regional stability through the Houthi militias,” he said, adding that the coalition and the Yemeni Army continue to target Houthi capabilities.

The Houthis continue to threaten maritime traffic in the Bab Al-Mandeb strait and the Red Sea, and are still planting mines that threaten civilians, Al-Maliki said, adding that more than 72,000 mines have been removed from roads and farms. Maritime mines planted by the Houthis are similar to the Iranian Sada mines, he said.  

There were 226 ballistic missiles launched by the Houthis toward Saudi Arabia between March 26, 2015, and June 10, 2019, he added.


Saudi tourism megaproject aims to turn the Red Sea green

Updated 20 October 2019

Saudi tourism megaproject aims to turn the Red Sea green

  • Development will protect endangered hawksbill turtle, while coral research could help save the Great Barrier Reef

RIYADH: Key ecological targets are driving Saudi Arabia’s Red Sea tourism megaproject, its leader has told Arab News.

The development will not only protect the habitat of the endangered hawksbill turtle, but could also save coral reefs that are dying elsewhere in the world, said Red Sea Development Company Chief Executive John Pagano.

The project is taking shape in a 28,000 square kilometer region of lagoons, archipelagos, canyons and volcanic geology between the small towns of Al-Wajh and Umluj on the Kingdom’s west coast.

One island, Al-Waqqadi, looked like the perfect tourism destination, but was discovered to be a breeding ground for the hawksbill. “In the end, we said we’re not going to develop it. It shows you can balance development and conservation,” Pagano said.

Scientists are also working to explain why the area’s coral reef system — fourth-largest in the world —  is thriving when others around the world are endangered.

“To the extent we solve that mystery, the ambition would be to export that to the rest of the world,” Pagano said. “Can we help save the Great Barrier Reef or the Caribbean coral that has been severely damaged?”

 

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