Yemen foreign minister resigns amid differences over UN efforts

Khaled Al-Yamani took over the post in May 2018. (AFP/File photo)
Updated 10 June 2019

Yemen foreign minister resigns amid differences over UN efforts

  • Khaled Al-Yamani was faulted by some government official for not criticizing the UN's special envoy
  • Yemeni president last month complained to the UN secretary-general that envoy Martin Griffiths was 'legitimising' the Houthi militants

ADEN: Yemen’s foreign minister has submitted his resignation as differences emerge within the internationally recognized government over the handling of a UN-led peace initiative in the main port city of Hodeidah, two ministry sources said Monday.

Khaled Al-Yamani, who took over the post in May 2018, said he would step down after some officials in the government of Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi faulted him for not criticizing United Nations special envoy Martin Griffiths' performance.

The resignation needs to be accepted by Hadi, who last month complained in a letter to the UN secretary-general that Griffiths was “legitimising” the Houthi militants fighting against his government.

“He (Yamani) was expecting to be dismissed and so he submitted his resignation before that happens,” one source said.

Yamani could not immediately be reached for comment.

In his letter to Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, Hadi said Griffiths had failed to properly oversee the agreement for a ceasefire and troop withdrawal in Hodeidah, which became the focus of the war last year when the coalition tried to seize the Houthi-held Red Sea port.

The pact reached in December, the first significant breakthrough in peacemaking in over four years, had stalled for months until the Iran-aligned Houthis, who ousted Hadi from the capital Sanaa in late 2014, last month quit three ports in Hodeidah in a unilateral move.

The Houthis recently stepped up drone attacks on Saudi cities following a lull last year ahead of the December talks.

A UN official is expected to visit Saudi Arabia this week for talks with Saudi and Yemeni officials. Saudi Arabia is a member of the coalition of Arab countries providing military support to forces loyal to Hadi.


Rival Tripoli government restricts Libya’s oil revenues: Benghazi-based PM

Updated 54 min 46 sec ago

Rival Tripoli government restricts Libya’s oil revenues: Benghazi-based PM

  • Libya’s National Oil Corporation has said it is neutral in the conflict

BENGHAZI, Libya: The head of Libya’s parallel government in the east says rival, UN-backed authorities in Tripoli have restricted oil revenues to areas under its control.

Benghazi-based Prime Minister Abdullah Al-Thani told The Associated Press Tuesday that the country’s eastern regions were receiving only about $126 million monthly for public salaries, despite holding most of Libya’s oil facilities.

However, he says the rival Tripoli-based government, which controls Libya’s Central Bank, has continued to give oil revenues to “outlawed groups and militias.”

He says his government has resorted to loans to do its businesses. Al-Thani leads an interim government in the east which is backed by the self-styled Libyan National Army, which has been battling to take Tripoli since April.

Libya’s National Oil Corporation has said it is neutral in the conflict.