UAE, Germany vow to continue joint fight against terrorism and extremism

The joint UAE-German statement was released on the occasion of the visit of Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al-Nahyan to Germany, where he met Angela Merkel. (SPA)
Updated 12 June 2019

UAE, Germany vow to continue joint fight against terrorism and extremism

  • During his visit, Sheikh Mohamed met with German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier and Chancellor Angela Merkel
  • UAE and Germany both expressed concern about growing tensions in the Middle East

BERLIN: The UAE and Germany vowed to continue their fight against terrorism and violent extremism — in all its forms, at both regional and international levels — in a joint statement released on Wednesday.
The statement was released on the occasion of the visit of Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al-Nahyan to Germany.
During his visit, Sheikh Mohamed met with German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier and Chancellor Angela Merkel.
In the statement, the UAE and Germany both expressed concern about growing tensions in the Middle East and both called on Iran to play a “constructive role” in the region and “refrain from any escalatory steps,” as well as respecting sovereignty and non-interference in the affairs of other countries.
The UAE and Germany agreed on the importance of all parties in the region refraining from any actions that could escalate existing tensions.
The two countries discussed the situation in Yemen and their support for the ongoing efforts by UN envoy to Yemen Martin Griffiths. They also agreed that a military solution would not work in both Syria and Libya, calling the Syrian conflict a “priority for the international community as a whole” and the need for a “political solution” in Libya.
The close political, social and economic ties between the two countries were also discussed during the crown prince’s visit.


Hard-hit Turkey’s easing of lockdown criticized

Updated 30 May 2020

Hard-hit Turkey’s easing of lockdown criticized

ANKARA: Turkey is easing its coronavirus lockdown from June 1, despite the World Health Organization saying it is one of the leading European countries for coronavirus infections. 

The virus has killed 4,461 people in Turkey, and there were 160,979 infections as of May 28. It ranks 10th worldwide in confirmed COVID-19 cases. Restaurants and cafes will be allowed to reopen from Monday while intercity travel restrictions will be lifted the same day.

Many professional organizations, especially the Turkish Medical Association, find the abrupt restart of business activity to be premature and have called for increased testing, claiming that mass gatherings may trigger further contagion as the first wave of the outbreak is not yet over.

Lebanese security forces began handing out fines to enforce the wearing of face masks, as the country recorded four new cases to bring its tally to 1,172.

Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia recorded 17 new COVID-19-related deaths, raising the total to 458. There were 1,581 new cases reported in Saudi Arabia, meaning 81,766 people have now contracted the disease. There are 24,295 active cases.

France’s national health agency reported a sudden jump in new infections — just an hour after the prime minister announced a sweeping national reopening plan. The agency clarified that the new figures were the result of a new accounting method, and not linked to a much-feared second wave of the virus.