Zombie Apocalypse Park set to scare thrill-seekers in Dubai

The Zombie Apocalypse Park will feature more than 12 activities and attractions and will open in The Night Market at Deira Islands (digital rendering pictured) in 2020. (Photo courtesy: Nahkeel Malls)
Updated 29 June 2019

Zombie Apocalypse Park set to scare thrill-seekers in Dubai

DUBAI: Ever wondered how you would fare if you were to face a zombie apocalypse? Well now you can find out as it was announced that a zombie-themed theme park is set to open in Dubai next year.

The Zombie Apocalypse Park will feature more than 12 activities and attractions and will open in The Night Market at Deira Islands in 2020.

According to reports, activities will include a paintball zone, escape games, a VR 9D cinema and a creepy haunted corn maze, as well as laser tag, trampolines and target shooting games.

The 65,000 sq ft park is set to be created by Nakheel Malls, which teamed up with Sharjah Golf & Shooting Club to create the attraction.

Omar Khoory, managing director of Nakheel Malls, said: “We are committed to creating unique, unforgettable experiences, attractions and facilities at our existing and upcoming retail developments. The Zombie Apocalypse Park will be a huge draw at The Night Market, attracting tourists, businesses and schools for team-building events and families and individuals for a new kind of entertainment.”


What We Are Reading Today: Empires of Vice by Diana S. Kim

Updated 2 min 54 sec ago

What We Are Reading Today: Empires of Vice by Diana S. Kim

During the late 19th century, opium was integral to European colonial rule in Southeast Asia. 

The taxation of opium was a major source of revenue for British and French colonizers, who also derived moral authority from imposing a tax on a peculiar vice of their non-European subjects. 

Yet between the 1890s and the 1940s, colonial states began to ban opium, upsetting the very foundations of overseas rule — how did this happen? Empires of Vice traces the history of this dramatic reversal, revealing the colonial legacies that set the stage for the region’s drug problems today, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

Diana Kim challenges the conventional wisdom about opium prohibition — that it came about because doctors awoke to the dangers of drug addiction or that it was a response to moral crusaders — uncovering a more complex story deep within the colonial bureaucracy. 

Drawing on a wealth of archival evidence across Southeast Asia and Europe, she shows how prohibition was made possible by the pivotal contributions of seemingly weak bureaucratic officials.