Asus rolls out new laptops for Saudi market

Updated 10 July 2019

Asus rolls out new laptops for Saudi market

Taiwan-based computer hardware company Asus recently held an event in Riyadh to preview its new computers in the Saudi market.

Meanwhile, a range of new technologies was unveiled at Computex, the international information technology show. 

The categories announced at the event are Asus for the typical user, ROG for gamers and Asus Pro machines for business.

The event was attended by several businessmen and Asus partners.

Benjamin Yeh, general manager of Asus, said his company offers what its customers need in different sectors. He said Asus has helped launch many innovations.

Asus is celebrating the 30th anniversary of the company. To mark the occasion at the event, a special-edition laptop was presented to Faisal Alsaif, a renowned Arab technical content provider. 

Alsaif, in his speech, discussed the positive contribution made by Asus to modern technology in Saudi Arabia.

Asus has reiterated through the various versions of its products that it focuses on the development of design excellence. 

It stresses maximum performance and quality control. Asus takes pride in presenting the latest in computers and technology, the company said in a statement.

New products highlighting different technologies were displayed at the event. ZenBook Pro Du with two screens stole the show. 

Several versions of laptops for gamers, offering the separate screen feature, were put on display.

Strix Scar 3 Gaming laptops, having screens with frame rate of up to 240Hz and other ROG laptops, offering more features attracted attention.

The company’s laptop series and all-in-one business-to-business PCs were also announced at the event.

Machines that interest private- and government-sector companies, offering technologies developed to suit this category of users, are the cornerstone of business success.


Whale shark hot spot in Red Sea offers new insights

An international team of KAUST researchers studied whale shark movement patterns near the Shib Habil reef (Arabic for ‘Rope Reef’), a known whale shark hotspot in the Red Sea on the Saudi Arabian coast.
Updated 18 November 2019

Whale shark hot spot in Red Sea offers new insights

According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), whale sharks are considered endangered, which means the species has suffered a population decline of more than 50 percent in the past three generations. The whale shark is only two classifications from being extinct. Improvements and conservation efforts are in place, but there is still a long way to
go to protect these gentle underwater giants.
An international team of researchers, led by marine scientists at King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia and including researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the US, has performed an extensive study of whale shark movement and residency using a combination of three scientific techniques: Visual census, acoustic monitoring and satellite telemetry.
Their six-year study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, tracked long-term whale shark movement patterns near the Shib Habil reef (Arabic for “Rope Reef”), a known whale shark hotspot in the Red Sea. The team monitored a total of 84 different sharks over a six-year period, and their results shed light on whale shark behaviors,
which could help to inform conservation efforts.
“The study takes years of passive acoustic monitoring data and combines it with previously published visual census and satellite telemetry data from the same individual sharks. The combined dataset is used to characterize the aggregation’s seasonality, spatial distribution, and patterns of dispersal,” said Dr. Michael Berumen, director of the Red Sea Research Center and professor of marine science at KAUST.

HIGHLIGHT

An international team of researchers, led by marine scientists at King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia and including researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the US, has performed an extensive study of whale shark movement and residency.

They found the aggregation to be highly seasonal, with sharks being most abundant in April and May, and that many of the sharks returned to the hot spot regularly year after year. The study also shows roughly equal numbers of male and female sharks using the site, something that could be unique to Shib Habil. These characteristics indicate that this site may serve an important function for the wider Indian Ocean population of this rare and endangered species.
“Using the combined dataset, we can show somewhat conclusively that the aggregation meets all of the criteria of a shark nursery. This is particularly relevant given that Shib Habil is the only site in the Indian Ocean to regularly attract large numbers of juvenile females. Growing late-stage adolescents of both sexes into full adulthood is critical for sustaining a species. Management of critical habitats like Shib Habil and other aggregations will likely be vital for future whale shark conservation,” said KAUST graduate Dr. Jesse Cochran, lead author of the study.
There is a combination of factors contributing to the decrease of whale shark populations world-wide, including targeted fishing, bycatch losses due to fisheries, vessel strikes from boat traffic, marine debris, and pollution.