On the trail of the Makkah of Europe: Woking’s Islamic heritage

On the trail of the Makkah of Europe: Woking’s Islamic heritage
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The mosque was built as part of a vision by Dr. Gottlieb Wilhelm Leitner, to include the main religions (Islam, Judaism, Christianity and Hinduism), but he passed away before he could fulfill his commitments. (Everyday Muslim/Tharik Hussain)
On the trail of the Makkah of Europe: Woking’s Islamic heritage
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Several Muslim kings, princes, princesses, sultans, Victorians, soldiers and other prominent figures lay rest at Britain's first Muslim cemetery. (Everyday Muslim/Tharik Hussain)
On the trail of the Makkah of Europe: Woking’s Islamic heritage
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The Woking Muslim War Cemetery, now known as the Peace Gardens, played a prominent part in the remembrance of the centenary of the World War I. (Everyday Muslim/Tharik Hussain)
On the trail of the Makkah of Europe: Woking’s Islamic heritage
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The Woking Muslim War Cemetery was the final resting place of 27 Muslim soldiers who fought for the British Empire and the Free French Forces during the conflict. (Everyday Muslim/Tharik Hussain)
On the trail of the Makkah of Europe: Woking’s Islamic heritage
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Lord Headley, also known as Sheikh Rahmatullah Al-Farooq, an Irish peer, and one of the leading members of the Woking Muslim Mission who helped the Shah Jahan Mosque flourish, with the aim of bringing it back to life as a platform for promoting Islam in Europe, was also buried in this cemetery. (Everyday Muslim/Tharik Hussain)
On the trail of the Makkah of Europe: Woking’s Islamic heritage
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Dr. Gottlieb Wilhelm Leitner (tomb pictured) established the first purpose-built mosque in northwestern Europe 130 years ago. Five years earlier he had also acquired a plot in the nearby Brookwood cemetery for the purpose of Muslim burials. (Everyday Muslim/Tharik Hussain)
On the trail of the Makkah of Europe: Woking’s Islamic heritage
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Muhammad Marmaduke Pickthall (tomb pictured) was a British Islamic scholar known for translating the Qur'an into English, is also buried at the Brookwood cemetery. (Everyday Muslim/Tharik Hussain)
On the trail of the Makkah of Europe: Woking’s Islamic heritage
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The Woking Muslim War Cemetery, now known as the Peace Gardens, played a prominent part in the remembrance of the centenary of the World War I. (Everyday Muslim/Tharik Hussain)
On the trail of the Makkah of Europe: Woking’s Islamic heritage
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The 'Makkah of Europe' - the Shah Jahan Mosque is the first purpose-built mosque in Britain.
On the trail of the Makkah of Europe: Woking’s Islamic heritage
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The Woking Trail - Britain's first Muslim heritage trail, incorporating three of the country's most important Islamic sites.
Updated 30 July 2019

On the trail of the Makkah of Europe: Woking’s Islamic heritage

On the trail of the Makkah of Europe: Woking’s Islamic heritage
  • Everyday Muslim announced the discovery of a forgotten Arab/British princess directly descended from the Prophet Muhammad
  • Buried in a Muslim plot at the Brookwood Cemetery near Britain's first Muslim Cemetery

LONDON: The grave of a British Muslim, believed to be a direct descendent of the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him), has been discovered in a suburban town about 50 kilometers (30 miles) southwest of London.

Nestled in the woodlands of Woking, Surrey, Princess Sharifa Musbah Haidar El-Hasimi (also known as Musbah Khanum and Musbah Haidar El-Ghalib) lies in one of Europe’s oldest Muslim cemeteries, surrounded by the graves of other notable Muslim Britons from the late Victorian period and beyond.

The burial ground, the first Muslim cemetery established in Britain, was unearthed as part of a trail led by Everyday Muslim, a non-profit organization dedicated to documenting Muslim heritage in the UK.

“Fascinating revelations on the history of this particular princess and her final resting place have been unearthed during a self-guided trail that takes visitors to three of Britain’s most important Islamic sites, offering an overview of each one,” said Tharik Hussain, the project’s manager.

It was Hussain who first discovered the story of the Princess when he stumbled across one of her books in a small bookshop in Brighton about six years ago. Captivated by this discovery, he began researching her background.

Princess Musbah Haidar, according to Everyday Muslim, was the second daughter of the Grand Sharif of Makkah, Amir Ali Haidar of the family of Devi Zeids, who claim to be direct descendants of the Prophet Muhammad. 




Princess Musbah Haidar was the second daughter of the Grand Sharif of Makkah, Amir Ali Haidar of the family of Devi Zeids, who claim to be direct descendants of the Prophet Muhammad. (Supplied, no known copyright)

Princess Musbah’s mother was an Englishwoman of Irish descent called Isabel Dunn, who converted to Islam and became Amira Fatima, the second wife of Haidar. She was employed as an English teacher for the children from his first marriage.

Everyday Muslim reported that Princess Musbah was born at the family retreat, known as Chamlujah, in Istanbul on Nov. 25 1918, and had an older sister called Sfyne and a brother named Faisal. 

She was initially brought up in the city, but following the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, her family was forced to leave.

Later she moved to England, and married Maj. Francis Stewart Fripp, who later converted to Islam, taking the name Ghalib. 

The princess’s ancestry is not well known as, at the time, the Ottomans had installed the other side of her family on the throne in Makkah. In 1916, with the encouragement and support of Britain, the then Sharif of Makkah, Hussein bin Ali, led a revolt against the Ottomans to create a united Arab state.

Everyday Muslim states: “Her great grandfather was the late Emir Abdul Muttalib, who was the grandson of Emir Musaad, who was directly descended from the patriarch of the House of Devi Zeid, Muhsin, whose brother Abdullah was the patriarch of the House of Devi-Aoun, which is the family tree of the current monarchs of Jordan and the historic monarchs of Iraq.

“Both houses stem from Emir Hassan, whose lineage is traced directly back eleven generations to Emir Katada of Makkah in 1174 AD. Emir Katada’s lineage traces back a further eight generations to Abdullah, the son of Mohammed Al-Alaoui, who is the grandson of Abdullah, the son of Hassan Al-Mussema.”

Al-Mussema was the son of Hassan, the brother of Hussein, whose father was the fourth caliph of Islam, Ali, the husband of Fatima, the daughter of the Prophet Muhammad. 

In her lifetime, the princess authored two books; “Arabesque: an account of Harem Life,” detailing her life as a Makkan princess, and “Dawn Beyond the Tamarisks.” Her death was announced in The Times in January 1977.

According to Hussain, the two other Muslim sites in Woking the organization promotes have also been in the media recently: The Woking Muslim War Cemetery, which was renovated a few years ago and featured in the centenary celebrations of the Great War, and the Shah Jahan Mosque, which became the first in the country to be listed as a grade I historic monument as the first purpose-built mosque in northwest Europe.

The latter of these, named after Sultan Shah Jahan Begum, ruler of the British Raj tributary state of Bhopal, has a significant history.




The 130 year-old Shah Jahan mosque, in suburban Surrey, bears the name of its key donor, the Sultan Shah Jahan Begum, ruler of the British-Indian princely state of Bhopal. (Everyday Muslim/Tharik Hussain)


It was the vision of Dr. Gottlieb Wilhelm Leitner, an orientalist born of Jewish parents from Hungary. A remarkable individual, according to the mosque’s website, aged 17 he “took a degree at King’s College, London, by which time it is said he could speak 15 languages.” He later went on to found the forerunner to the School of Oriental and African Studies.

The mosque itself was designed by Anglo-Irish architect William Isaac Chambers in a style that mirrored Indian Mughal architecture from the 16th century.

FUNFACT

In popular culture, the Shah Jahan Mosque was destroyed in H.G. Wells’ novel “War of the Worlds,” which was set in the author’s hometown of Woking.

Why Woking of all places?
Lietner, a religious scholar who lived and worked for many years in India and abroad, wanted to set up a college that would allow people to study the religions of the East.

“He came up with a site just outside London, in Woking, where this beautiful gothic building, known at the time as the Royal Dramatic College, had fallen on hard times and was up for sale. So it was really about convenience. It came with lots of land and it meant he didn’t have to pay the high prices that he would have paid had he found somewhere in London,” Hussain told Arab News. 

Lietner wanted to build free places of worship there as well, including a Hindu temple, an Eastern Christian church, a synagogue and a mosque. Because he anticipated people from all over the world would come, including Muslims, one of the first things he did in 1884 was secure a plot at the nearby cemetery (Brookwood) exclusively for the use of Muslim burials. 




The mosque (interior pictured above with the direction of the qibla) was built initially, along with a Muslim cemetery, as Dr. Gottlieb Wilhelm Leitner understood that burial rites in Islam were a very important rite. (Everyday Muslim/Tharik Hussain)

A stone still stands to this day inscribed with specific instructions on how to bury Muslims, as very few people in Victorian Britain understood the specific procedures.

His institute flourished and after five years he began building the mosque, but passed away before he could fulfill his vision.

The Shah Jahan Mosque was completed in 1889, but according to its website: “Abdullah Quilliam’s Liverpool mosque, opened in 1889, pre-dates Woking by a few months, but the Shah Jahan has the honor of being the first purpose-built mosque in Europe outside of Muslim Spain.”

FASTFACT

The Shah Jahan Mosque in Woking is the oldest purpose-built mosque in northwestern Europe and was known as the “Makkah of Europe” during the early 20th century, when it became the center of Islam in the UK.

Hussain adds: “So this is why Woking, because it had Britain’s first purpose-built mosque and Britain’s first Muslim cemetery, so naturally Muslims were drawn to it.”

Unfortunately, the mosque was neglected after Leitner’s passing for over a decade, but was then restored by an Indian lawyer, Khwaja Kamal-ud-Din, who had befriended influential Victorians curious about Islam, including a Lord who later became a convert. 

His name was Lord Headley, also known as Sheikh Rahmatullah Al-Farooq, an Irish peer, and one of the leading members of the Woking Muslim Mission who helped the center flourish, with the aim of bringing it back to life as a platform for promoting islam in Europe, even becoming home to one of the first Muslim publications in Europe, The Islamic Review.

That is why Woking has been dubbed the “Makkah of Europe” by the organizers of the trail.

The Muslim cemetries

The Woking Muslim War Cemetery, now known as the Peace Gardens, played a prominent part in the remembrance of the centenary of the First World War, between 1914-18. It was the final resting place of 27 Muslim soldiers who fought for the British Empire and Free French Forces during the two great wars..

But it is the other cemetery that Everyday Muslim is keen to highlight, which you could say was the Westminster Abbey of Muslim cemeteries.


“This site is probably the least known and ironically is actually the oldest Muslim space we know of in Britain. It is a plot of land originally known as the ‘Muhammadan Cemetery,’ founded in 1884, within the nearby Brookwood cemetery, by Dr. Leitner,” Hussain told Arab News.

Princess Musbah resides here alongside Abdullah Quilliam (1856‑1932), founder of Britain’s first mosque and Muslim publication, Muhammad Marmaduke William Pickthall (1875‑1936), author of the first ‘native’ English translation of the Holy Qur’an, Naji Al‑Ali (1936‑1987), Palestinian political cartoonist and creator of “Handalah,” Sepoy Ahmad Khan (died 1914), the first British Muslim soldier buried on British soil, and many other famous Muslims, such as Victorians, princes and princesses, sultans and so on.




The  cemetery in Woking is home to several important Muslim dignitaries. (Everyday Muslim/Tharik Hussain)

What is the aim?
Everyday Muslim wants to reach a point where sites such as these are not labelled as “British Muslim” heritage, but just “British” heritage.

Hussain, who also develops self-guided trails across the world for Lonely Planet guidebooks, said it should be recognized as a significant part of the island's history

Sir Laurie Magnus, chairman of Historic England, which is responsible for protecting and championing the country’s heritage, said “Muslim heritage is very much a part of Britain’s heritage and I am delighted to launch this trail,” to celebrate these beautiful sites.

The initiative was aided by the National Lottery Heritage Fund, as part of a bigger project concerning the heritage and history of the mosque and the surrounding area. 

Hussain said: “We wanted to put these trails out there so that Muslims and non-Muslims up and down the country could see the potential.”

He said they see this as a start, and hope to receive more funding to highlight Muslim heritage trails across the UK to make Muslim heritage in Britain more visible and a normalized part of the wider narrative.

“I think it’s really cool that in the process of trying to unearth British Muslim heritage, we are not only unearthing all these amazing stories of British people who were doing amazing things as Muslims and converts, but we find someone who has British blood and the Prophet’s blood. I think that’s just pretty fabulous, and something we should celebrate and embrace,” Hussain concluded.

The Trails developed by Hussain are available to download from here.


As Brazil tops 500,000 deaths, protests against president

As Brazil tops 500,000 deaths, protests against president
Updated 13 min 2 sec ago

As Brazil tops 500,000 deaths, protests against president

As Brazil tops 500,000 deaths, protests against president
  • Thousands gathered in downtown Rio de Janeiro waving flags with slogans such as “Get out Bolsonaro. Government of hunger and unemployment”

RIO DE JANEIRO: Anti-government protesters took to the streets in more than a score of cities across Brazil on Saturday as the nation's confirmed death toll from COVID-19 soared past half a million — a tragedy many critics blame on President Jair Bolsonaro's attempt to minimize the disease.
Thousands gathered in downtown Rio de Janeiro waving flags with slogans such as “Get out Bolsonaro. Government of hunger and unemployment.”
“Brazil is experiencing a great setback. The country was an exemplary country for vaccination in the world. We have widely recognized institutions, but today we are in a sad situation ”, said Isabela Gouljor, a 20-year-old student who joined the protest in Rio.
Other marchers hoisted posters reading: “500 thousand deaths. It’s his fault,” alluding to Bolsonaro.
Similar marches took place in at least 22 or Brazil's 26 states, as well as in the Federal District, Brasilia. They were promoted by left-wing opposition parties who have been heartened by Bolsonaro's declining poll ratings with next year's presidential race looming.
“Get out Bolsonaro, genocidal,” yelled Rio demonstrators, some of them wearing t-shirts or masks with the image of former leftist President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva — who leads Bolsonaro in some polls.
In São Paulo, protesters dropped red balloons as a tribute to the victims of the virus
Bolsonaro's supporters have taken more often to the streets over the past month, in large part because many agree with his dismissal of restrictions meant to stifle the coronavirus and anger that lockdown measures have hurt businesses.
Critics say such messages, as well as Bolsonaro's promotion of disproven treatments such as hydroxychloroquine, have contributed to the soaring death toll and a sluggish vaccine campaign that has fully inoculated less than 12% of the population. The country of some 213 million people is registering nearly 100,000 new infections and 2,000 deaths a day.
“For the leftists, putting their followers in the streets is a way of wearing Bolsonaro down for the election," said Leandro Consentino, a political science professor at Insper, a university in Sao Paulo. “But at the same, time they are contradicting themselves and losing the discourse of maintaining health care, because they are causing the same agglomerations as Bolsonaro.”
Saturday's marches came a week after Bolsonaro led backers in a massive motorcycle parade in Sao Paulo, though his supporters and critics differ dramatically on the size of that event.
“Bolsonaro needs to show that he maintains significant support to give a message of strength to those who are investigating the actions of his government in Congress”, Consentino said.


Ghani appoints new officials after setbacks in Afghanistan

Ghani appoints new officials after setbacks in Afghanistan
Updated 20 June 2021

Ghani appoints new officials after setbacks in Afghanistan

Ghani appoints new officials after setbacks in Afghanistan
  • Taliban seized 10 more districts on Friday amid withdrawal of US-led foreign troops

KABUL: President Ashraf Ghani replaced his ministers of interior and defense on Saturday after several territorial gains by the Taliban and the surrender of hundreds of government troops to the insurgent group in recent weeks.

The Taliban have captured dozens of small bases and districts across Afghanistan since May 1, when US-led foreign troops began withdrawing from the war-torn country as part of the last phase of their combat mission, amid stalled aerial support for Afghan forces.

In a statement on Saturday, the presidential palace said that under Ghani’s latest order, Gen. Bismillah Khan Mohammadi would succeed Assaduallah Khalid as defense minister while Kunduz’s governor, Abdul Sattar Mirzakawal, will replace Hayatullah Hayat as the interior minister. 

Mohammadi, a senior member of a faction involved in Afghanistan’s politics, war and economy, has served in the past as both interior and defense minister.

He is accused of squandering tens of millions of dollars of US aid in his previous role as defense minister and is an ally of Dr. Abdullah Abdullah, head of the national reconciliation council, who has shared power with Ghani since 2014.

Officials in Ghani’s office refused to comment on the move when contacted by Arab News on Saturday.

However, the development comes amid rising complaints by lawmakers and civilians over Ghani’s poor performance as commander-in-chief, and the interior and defense ministers’ failure to curb the Taliban’s gains.

“At least 10 districts in various regions across the country have been taken over by the Taliban since Friday,” two security officials, speaking on condition of anonymity as they are not authorized to speak to the media, told Arab News.

Before that, the Taliban seized more than 25 districts in recent weeks. Afghanistan comprises 34 provinces and at least 420 districts.

Hundreds of security forces have also surrendered to the insurgent group since May 1, when foreign troops began their exit from Afghanistan, which is expected to be completed by Sept. 11.

The loss of territory to the Taliban comes amid divisions among government leaders, particularly between Ghani and Abdullah, over the distribution of power and government resources.

Experts say that the issue of war management cannot be resolved by replacing officials.

“... because apart from division among leaders over which ministry should go to who, Ghani’s inner circle is a group of young people who have no experience in war, and they are dealing with war management,” Taj Mohammad, a Kabul-based analyst, told Arab News.

“The new appointments will have some symbolic and psychological short-term importance, but I doubt they will change much in favor of the government.”


Indonesians call for tighter curbs after 500% surge in COVID-19 cases

Indonesians call for tighter curbs after 500% surge in COVID-19 cases
Updated 20 June 2021

Indonesians call for tighter curbs after 500% surge in COVID-19 cases

Indonesians call for tighter curbs after 500% surge in COVID-19 cases
  • On Saturday, Indonesia reported 12,906 new infections, raising the total tally to 1,976,172 cases

JAKARTA: Calls are mounting for the Indonesian government to restrict public movement again after the country saw a 500 percent rise in COVID-19 cases in one month.

The daily tally of new COVID-19 infections rose from 2,385 on May 15 to 12,624 on June 17, according to official data. The surge was expected, especially after the Eid Al-Fitr holiday when millions of people traveled between cities on Indonesia’s most populated island of Java, despite a travel ban imposed at the end of Ramadan.

Experts say the Delta variant of the COVID-19 virus, which was first detected in India and is more virulent, could have compounded the problem.

On Saturday, Indonesia reported 12,906 new infections, raising the total tally to 1,976,172 cases. 

The capital city, Jakarta, registered 4,737 cases on Friday, which its governor, Anies Baswedan, described as “the highest number ever recorded during the pandemic.”

On Saturday, however, Jakarta set a new record with 4,895 new cases.

“The spike in confirmed COVID-19 cases has been occurring gradually for the past ten weeks, even though initially the surge was gradual,” Masdalina Pane, an expert on health policies and epidemiologist at the Indonesian Epidemiologists Association, told Arab News on Saturday.

“We have issued warnings since the start, but it fell on deaf ears because the rise was insignificant,” she added.

Pane alleged that the issue began after the government reduced the mandatory self-quarantine for international arrivals — and those in close contact with someone infected with the coronavirus — from 14 days to five days from earlier this year.

At the end of April, Indonesia banned arrivals from India for two weeks.

“We could have prevented the new variants from entering Indonesia by mandating 14 days quarantine for international arrivals,” she said.

“We are harvesting the results of policies that disregards the basic principles of disease control,” she added.

On Friday, medical associations issued a joint call for the central government to impose wide-scale restrictions on public activity across Java.

Doctors said that hospitals in cities on the island were running out of bed space while the health care system could collapse unless the government intervened to curb the spread of the disease.

“Don’t let us become the second India,” Erlina Burhan of the Indonesian Association of Pulmonologists (PDPI) said in a virtual press conference.

Aman Pulungan, chairman of the Indonesian Pediatric Society (IDAI), also called on limiting children’s outdoor activities at a time when the government is set to reopen schools for the next academic year.

“The national data on COVID-19 cases showed that 12.5 percent of the cases are children; it means that one in every eight patients is a child,” Pulungan said, adding that the association’s data showed Indonesia’s case-fatality rate on children infected with the coronavirus is up to 5 percent or “the highest in the world.”

Meanwhile, thousands of citizens have signed an online petition to President Joko Widodo urging him to step up the government’s response to the health crisis.

“We have almost 2,000 signatures so far since we distributed the letter on Friday afternoon. We want to draw the president’s attention to the surge of cases and the few availability of beds to treat COVID-19 patients and for those who need to self-isolate,” Irma Hidayana, public health consultant and founder of Lapor COVID-19 (Report COVID-19) community movement, which initiated the letter, told Arab News.


Duterte’s special envoy arrives in Saudi Arabia to enhance bilateral, trade ties

Duterte’s special envoy arrives in Saudi Arabia to enhance bilateral, trade ties
Updated 20 June 2021

Duterte’s special envoy arrives in Saudi Arabia to enhance bilateral, trade ties

Duterte’s special envoy arrives in Saudi Arabia to enhance bilateral, trade ties
  • The Filipino delegation includes Foreign Affairs Undersecretary for Migrant Workers Affairs Sarah Lou Arriola and Presidential Communications Assistant Secretary for Global Media and Public Affairs J. V. Arcena

MANILA: President Rodrigo Duterte’s Special Envoy and Presidential Assistant on Foreign Affairs Robert E. A. Borje began his five-day official visit to Saudi Arabia on Saturday to enhance bilateral ties and labor reforms cooperation and ensure the “well-being of Filipino workers” in the Kingdom.

During the visit, which ends on June 24, Borje is also expected to convey Duterte’s key messages to Saudi Arabia on the “importance of partnership and cooperation between the two countries.”

In a statement on Friday, the Malacañang said the visit was in line with the president’s promise of “kalinga and malasakit,” or care and concern, for Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs), especially in light of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic.

Filipino officials are expected to hold talks with Saudi authorities from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Development and the National Committee to Combat Human Trafficking on Sunday.

The Filipino delegation includes Foreign Affairs Undersecretary for Migrant Workers Affairs Sarah Lou Arriola and Presidential Communications Assistant Secretary for Global Media and Public Affairs J. V. Arcena.

“We are now in Saudi Arabia. Tonight, we have a virtual town hall meeting with the Filipino community. Meetings with the Saudi side will start tomorrow,” Arcena said in a message to Arab News on Saturday.

The group will also meet officials from the Philippine Embassy in Riyadh, the Philippine Consulate General in Jeddah and members from the expatriate community and overseas repatriation missions for Filipinos affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

This is the second time Duterte has assigned Borje as a special envoy. In 2019, he was designated for a visit to Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Tunisia to check on OFWs in North Africa and the Middle East.

The Philippines and Saudi Arabia marked 50 years of diplomatic ties in 2019, with President Duterte congratulating King Salman for the Kingdom’s “landmark” Labor Reform Initiative, which, among other benefits, abolished the kafala system for migrant workers last year.

In a phone call with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in May, Duterte renewed the Philippines’ commitment to strengthen bilateral and trade ties and intensify cooperation on migrant workers’ rights.

He also conveyed his appreciation for the Kingdom’s free COVID-19 vaccinations for Filipinos and the financial assistance extended to the Philippine health sector during outgoing Saudi Ambassador to the Philippines Abdullah N.A. Al-Bussairy’s farewell event in the Malacañang last week.

Al-Bussairy assured the president of the Saudi government’s continued support to the Philippines, including in the international fora and with regard to migrant workers’ rights.

He also underscored the contributions of Filipino workers to Saudi Arabia’s socio-economic development and added that the Kingdom is working to increase two-way trade and investments with the Philippines to facilitate the country’s economic recovery.

Meanwhile, the Malacañang said on Saturday that Borje’s visit to the Kingdom kicked off with the repatriation of 347 distressed Filipinos, including five children affected by the pandemic.

In a statement, Borje expressed gratitude on behalf of the president to the embassy in Riyadh, the consulate general in Jeddah, the Department of Foreign Affairs and the king and crown prince for making the repatriation possible.

The repatriates flew home via a Philippine Airlines chartered flight as part of the Philippine government’s repatriation mission from Saudi Arabia, with a second repatriation flight expected next week.

Upon arrival in Manila, the repatriates will receive cash assistance from the Philippine government, as instructed by the president.

As of Friday, 403,234 OFWs have been repatriated by the government since the start of the pandemic. Some 105,582 are seafarers, while 297,652 are land-based workers.

Saudi Arabia hosts more than 800,000 Filipinos, the highest in any Gulf state, according to a 2020 government estimate. About half work as domestic laborers, while others are employed in the Kingdom’s construction, outsourcing and health care sectors.


Russia reports 17,906 new COVID-19 cases, 466 deaths

Russia reports 17,906 new COVID-19 cases, 466 deaths
Updated 19 June 2021

Russia reports 17,906 new COVID-19 cases, 466 deaths

Russia reports 17,906 new COVID-19 cases, 466 deaths
  • The government coronavirus task force confirmed 466 coronavirus-related deaths in the past 24 hours

MOSCOW: Russia on Saturday reported 17,906 new COVID-19 cases, including a record 9,120 in Moscow, pushing the national infection tally up to 5,299,215 since the pandemic began.
The government coronavirus task force confirmed 466 coronavirus-related deaths in the past 24 hours, raising the death toll to 128,911.
The state statistics agency, which keeps separate figures, has said Russia recorded around 270,000 deaths related to COVID-19 from April 2020 to April 2021.