Rites and routes: Hajj exhibition a true journey through the ages

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Photographs covering different time periods, and sketches dating back more than three centuries are featured in the second hall of the Hajj exhibition. (SPA)
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Sheikh Abdullatif Al-Asheikh inaugurates the Hajj exhibition. (SPA)
Updated 19 August 2019

Rites and routes: Hajj exhibition a true journey through the ages

  • Three halls cover every aspect of pilgrimage
  • Exhibition material dates back hundreds of years

JEDDAH: An exhibition about the Hajj takes visitors on a journey through the ages with three halls exploring different aspects of the holy pilgrimage, the Saudi Press Agency reported.

Labbaik: The Hajj Journey Through the Ages was inaugurated earlier this month by the Saudi minister of Islamic affairs, dawah and guidance, Sheikh Abdullatif Al-Asheikh. 

The first hall introduces visitors to the magic of Makkah, which is the focus of Muslim attention around the world and plays a central role in the Hajj. 

Visitors learn about Prophet Abraham, his son Ishmael, wife Hajar and the Zamzam well miracle, when she went looking for water. She ran seven times between the two hills of Safa and Marwa — an act that is a compulsory part of the Hajj — and Allah’s response was to create a water spring at Ishamel’s feet.

The hall also features the history of the Kaaba from the Prophet Abraham’s time until its present form, which was ordered by Caliph Abd Al-Malik ibn Marwan.

Visitors learn about the Grand Mosque, the Kaaba’s interior, and Makkah’s rights and duties toward every Muslim.   




Photographs covering different time periods, and sketches dating back more than three centuries are featured in the second hall of the Hajj exhibition. (SPA)

Observations

They can watch a film about the Grand Mosque’s history, which is based on the observations of travelers, historians and artists from the last four centuries, and according to descriptions from pilgrims who have completed the Hajj.

The hall also includes the first photos taken of the Grand Mosque, along with recent color images.

The second hall takes a different sort of trip down memory lane as visitors can learn about the Hajj journey since the beginning of Islam. It features the hard paths and roads that pilgrims used to take to Makkah from all over the world, on camelback or on foot, facing danger in the form of thieves, bandits and harsh weather conditions.

Visitors can see photographs covering different time periods, and sketches dating back more than three centuries.   




Photographs covering different time periods, and sketches dating back more than three centuries are featured in the second hall of the Hajj exhibition. (SPA)

Holiest of missions

There are Hajj certificates on display, documents pilgrims used to obtain on behalf of others as proof the pilgrimage had been completed by the person assigned with this holiest of missions. 

The last part of this hall introduces visitors to the transformation journey in Saudi Arabia. As soon as the Saudi state was established and King Abdul Aziz Al-Saud arrived in Makkah, his priority was to establish greater security for pilgrims. He removed risks and implemented measures so that Muslims could visit Makkah and Madinah in ease and with peace of mind, such as modern transportation and better infrastructure. Visitors also have a chance to read the messages from Saudi kings to pilgrims.

The third and final hall focuses on the Kingdom’s efforts to serve pilgrims and there is a section about health awareness. 

The exhibition has been organized by the Ministry of Islamic Affairs, Dawah and Guidance in partnership with Al-Rajhi Investment Group.

It runs until Aug. 21 and is open daily from 9 a.m to 10 p.m. It is located at the Tilal Al-Naseem Complex in Makkah, which is about 10 kilometers from the Grand Mosque.


Condemnation of attacks on Saudi Aramco oil plants continue

Updated 17 September 2019

Condemnation of attacks on Saudi Aramco oil plants continue

  • Bahraini King calls Saudi leadership

RIYADH: Condemnations of Saturday’s attack on Saudi Aramco oil installations continued on Monday, as the US pointed out Iran as the likely culprit behind the drone strikes that have dramatically escalated tensions in the region and triggered a record leap in global oil prices.

King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman both received calls from the King Hamad bin Isa Al-Khalifa of Bahrain to condemn the attacks at Saudi oil facilities in Abqaiq and Khurais.

US Secretary of Defense Mark Esper called the crown prince, who is also the defense minister, to affirm his country's full support for the Kingdom.

British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said, “We will work with international partners to forge the widest and most effective response,” with a statement from his ministry saying the “UK remains committed to supporting the security of Saudi Arabia.”

India also slammed the attacks and reiterated the country’s “rejection of terrorism in all its forms and manifestations,” a foreign ministry spokesman said.

Official Spokesperson of the UN Secretary General Stephane Dujarric said in a statement that the Secretary General condemns Saturday's attacks on two Aramco oil plants.

The German Foreign Ministry spokeswoman said, “Such an attack on civilian and vital infrastructure in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is not justified”.

— with SPA