Priyanka Chopra steps out in Jordanian-Romanian designer

The label shared a picture of Chopra wearing Muaddi’s feather-trimmed Adwoa sandals. (AFP)
Updated 20 August 2019

Priyanka Chopra steps out in Jordanian-Romanian designer

DUBAI: Bollywood actress Priyanka Chopra was spotted wearing a pair of sandals by the Jordanian-Romanian designer Amina Muaddi at US pop star Joe Jonas’s recent James Bond-themed birthday party.

The label shared a picture of Chopra wearing Muaddi’s feather-trimmed Adwoa sandals. Chopra paired them with a sheer feathered mini-dress with a beaded boat-cut neckline. Her husband, Joe’s brother Nick Jonas, looked very 007 in a black tuxedo.




Chopra, wearing sandals by Amina Muaddi, with husband Nick Jonas at his brother’s James Bond party. (Instagram)

Muaddi’s up-and-coming label is known for its bright hues and razor-thin stiletto heels that often widen out into a squared block at the base of the heel. 

Muaddi, whose footwear label is designed in Paris and produced in Italy, has also been in the spotlight, with the likes of Kylie and Kendall Jenner, Rihanna and British model Rosie Huntington-Whiteley showing off her heels earlier this year.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Kylie @aminamuaddiofficial

A post shared by AMINA MUADDI (@aminamuaddi) on

Back in April, beauty mogul Rihanna was spotted in New York – reportedly out and about with her Saudi beau Hassan Jameel – wearing a black coat with strappy white sandals by Muaddi, while Huntington-Whiteley has been an avid fan for quite some time and regularly takes to Instagram to show off Muaddi’s latest designs.

Joe Jonas, who turned 30 on Thursday, celebrated with his family and friends at Cipriani Wall Street in New York City. According to E! News, he and his wife, Hollywood actress Sophie Turner, arrived at the party in an Aston Martin, which is the car James Bond drives. 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

It’s in the air..

A post shared by Priyanka Chopra Jonas (@priyankachopra) on

This is not the first time Chopra has shown off the works of Arab designers. When Turner married Joe Jonas in June, Chopra wore multiple ensembles by Saudi fashion label Honayda. She went casual in a button-down lilac shirt dress from the label’s Spring-Summer 2019 collection, but she ramped things up for the rehearsal dinner with an ivory strapless satin gown that featured a sweetheart neckline from the same collection.

Earlier this year in Los Angeles, Chopra was spotted wearing a mustard yellow trench coat by Dubai-based modest wear brand Bouguessa.


South Asian marriage websites under fire for color bias

Updated 12 July 2020

South Asian marriage websites under fire for color bias

DHAHRAN: An online backlash has forced the matrimonial website Shaadi.com to take down an ‘skin color’ filter which asked users to specify their skin color using descriptors such as fair, wheatish or dark. The filter on the popular site, which caters to the South Asian diaspora, was one of the parameters for matching prospective partners.

Meghan Nagpal, a Toronto-based graduate student, logged on to the website and was appalled to see the skin-color filter. “Why should I support such archaic view [in 2020]?” she told Arab News.

Nagpal cited further examples of implicit biases against skin color in the diaspora communities – women who are dark-skinned are never acknowledged as “beautiful” or how light-skinned South Asian women who are mistaken as Caucasian consider it a compliment.

“Such biases stem from a history of colonization and the mentality that ‘white is superior’,” she said.

When Nagpal emailed the website’s customer service team, she received the response that “this is what most parents require.” She shared her experience on a Facebook group, attracting the attention of Florida-based Roshni Patel and Dallas-based Hetal Lakhani. The former took to online activism by tweeting the company and the latter started an online petition.

Overnight, the petition garnered more 1,500 signatures and the site eventually removed the filter.

“Now is the time to re-evaluate what we consider beautiful. Colorism has significant consequences in our community, especially for women. People with darker skin experience greater prejudice, violence, bullying and social sanctions,” the petition reads. “The idea that fairer skin is ‘good’ and darker skin is ‘bad’ is completely irrational. Not only is it untrue, but it is an entirely socially constructed perception based in neo-colonialism and casteism, which has no place in the 21st century.”

Overnight, the petition garnered more 1,500 signatures and the site eventually removed the filter.

“When a user highlighted this, we were thankful and had the remnants removed immediately. We do not discriminate based on skin color and our member base is as diverse and pluralistic as the world,” a spokesperson said.

“If one company starts a movement like this, it can change minds and perceptions. This is a step in the right direction,” said Nagpal. Soon after, Shaadi.com’s competitor Jeevansathi.com also took down the skin filter from its website.

Colorism and bias in matrimony is only one issue; prejudices are deeply ingrained and widespread across society. Dr. Sarah Rasmi, a Dubai-based psychologist, highlights research and observations on how light skin is an advantage in society.

The website took down the skin filter following backlash.

“Dark skin tends to have lower socio-economic status and, in the US justice system, has been found to get harsher and more punitive sentences.

“These biases for fair as opposed to dark skin comes from colonial prejudices and the idea that historically, light skin has been associated with privilege, power and superiority,” she said.

However, in the wake of #BlackLivesMatter protests, change is underway.

Last month, Johnson & Johnson announced that it will be discontinuing its skin whitening creams in Asian and Middle Eastern markets, and earlier this month Hindustan Unilever Limited (Unilever’s Indian subsidiary) announced that it will remove the words ‘fair, white and light’ from its products and marketing. To promote an inclusive standard of beauty, it has also renamed its flagship Fair & Lovely product line to Glow & Lovely.

“Brands have to move away from these standards of beauty and be more inclusive so that people – regardless of their color, size, shape or gender – can find a role model that looks like them in the mass media,” said Dr. Rasmi.