Archer takes six as Australia all out for 179

England's Jofra Archer celebrates after taking his fifth wicket, that of Australia's Pat Cummins, right, caught by Jonny Bairstow for 0. (AP)
Updated 23 August 2019

Archer takes six as Australia all out for 179

HEADINGLY: Jofra Archer took six wickets as England dismissed an Australia side without star batsman Steve Smith for just 179 on the first day of the third Ashes Test at Headingley on Thursday.

Fast bowler Archer, in only his second Test, took 6-45 in 17.1 overs — the first time he had taken five or more wickets in an innings at this level.

England, looking to level this series at 1-1, reduced Australia to 25-2 after home captain Joe Root won the toss.

But David Warner (61) and Marnus Labuschagne (74) frustrated England in a third-wicket stand of 111.

Archer, however, turned the tide by having Warner caught behind off a 90 mph delivery.

It was the start of a collapse that saw Australia lose three wickets for three runs to be 139-5.

Travis Head was bowled for a duck by Stuart Broad and Matthew Wade, a century-maker in the first Test, also fell for nought when a rising Archer delivery deflected off the thigh pad via his glove and into the base of the stump, dislodging a bail.

Warner’s innings was his first double figure score of a series where he had previously managed just 18 runs in total, while Labuschagne scored his second successive 50 after he made 59 as a concussion substitute for Smith in the drawn second Test at Lord’s.

Root was hoping to make the most of overcast conditions at his Yorkshire home ground and capitalize on an Australia top order missing Smith, ruled out with a concussion suffered after being hit by a 92 mph bouncer from Archer at Lord’s.

Smith’s scores of 144, 142 and 92 had been central to putting Ashes-holders Australia ahead as they look to win a Test series away to England for the first time in 18 years.

Warner had previously managed scores of just two, eight, three and five this Ashes — his first Test campaign since both he and Smith completed 12-month ball-tampering bans. Warner’s fellow top-order left-handers Marcus Harris and Usman Khawaja both fell for eight.

Harris had been drafted in to open alongside Warner after Cameron Bancroft was dropped following 44 runs in four innings.

But Archer, bowling from around the wicket, squared Harris up with an 87.3 mph ball and had him caught behind by wicketkeeper Jonny Bairstow.

Moments later, with Australia 12-1 off four overs, rain stopped play.

When play resumed, Khawaja’s glance off Broad was caught by Bairstow.

England, however, had to first review New Zealand umpire Chris Gaffaney’s original not out decision.

More rain and bad light — even though the floodlights were on — halted play in the second session.

The resumption saw an increasingly assured Labuschagne hit two well-struck fours off first-change Chris Woakes.

England carelessly gave away several over-throw boundaries in desperate run-out attempts and when Ben Stokes dropped short, Warner cut him for four to go to 49.

A mistimed four off Stokes through point saw Warner complete a 79-ball fifty — a landmark greeted with now familiar boos from some fans.

But there were cheers too, with Warner’s wife Candice among those at the ground applauding her husband’s innings.

Warner was given out caught behind on 61 off Broad but successfully reviewed Gaffaney’s decision.

Labuschagne completed a 73-ball fifty as wickets continued to fall.

Archer had James Pattinson well caught by first slip Root and then had Pat Cummins, the third duck of the innings, caught behind, the disbelieving batsman failing with a review.

Labuschagne’s gutsy innings ended when he was lbw to Stokes after missing a full toss, with Archer ending the day’s play when he had tailender Nathan Lyon 


World’s richest horse race Saudi Cup to ‘open doors’ for tourists to Saudi Arabia

Updated 10 min 56 sec ago

World’s richest horse race Saudi Cup to ‘open doors’ for tourists to Saudi Arabia

  • Race billed as the richest on the planet with prize fund of $20 million
  • Visa procedures for the event were also confirmed on Monday

LONDON: Next year’s Saudi Cup horse race in Riyadh will help open up Saudi Arabia to visitors from around the world, Jockey Club of Saudi Arabia chairman Prince Bandar bin Khalid Al-Faisal said on Monday.

The race, billed as the richest on the planet with a prize fund of $20 million, will be run at the King Abdul Aziz racetrack in Riyadh on Feb. 29.

The race over a distance of nine furlongs (1,800 meters) on the dirt track will have a maximum field of 14 starters and will be free to enter and to participate in.

Prince Bandar told Arab News the race will allow visitors to the Kingdom an opportunity to enjoy everything the country has to offer.

“This event was initiated by the Jockey Club of Saudi Arabia, it has been two years in the making, and we were extremely encouraged by the position of the government,” he said.

“They have been very supportive in everything they can do to ensure it is a successful event, there is a definite political will to do so.”

Prince Bandar referred to an announcement earlier this month that Saudi Arabia would open its doors to tourists from around the world by the end of 2019.

“So that works for us very nicely,” he added.

Prince Bandar said while the prize money was obviously important in building the reputation of the event, it was not the sole reason for its hosting and that he hoped it would establish Saudi Arabia as a major racing nation on the global stage.

Jockey Club of Saudi Arabia's chairman Prince Bandar (C) with a host of UK trainers and jockey Frankie Dettori at the London launch of the Saudi Cup. (AN Photo/Daniel Fountain)

“It definitely falls in line with the kind of activities that are now opening up the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and its people and culture to people from all over the world, so that they can come and experience the country first-hand and have the opportunity to see a part of the world that has not been visited as often as we would like.

“The introduction of the Saudi Cup as an international race is without doubt the most significant event in the history of horse racing in Saudi Arabia and it demonstrates our resolve to develop this great sport in the Kingdom and also our ambition to become a leading player on horse racing’s world stage,” he added.

During his address in central London Prince Bandar said: “We will be thrilled to welcome international competitors to these new races. I am especially pleased that we will be having turf racing in Riyadh for the first time, things are really beginning to take shape.”

The prince also said he was keen for women jockeys and trainers to get involved with the Saudi Cup, adding they would be “most welcome” to compete at the event, and that he hoped it would entice some of the world’s most promising female talent.

“Women have been very active in equestrianism as a whole in the Kingdom, it is quite normal in Saudi Arabia for them to compete at that level,” he said.

Also announced at the London launch were the meeting’s support races, which include a staying handicap race run over 3,000 meters, a middle-distance race over 2,100 meters, while the two races on the dirt track are over 1,200 meters and 1,600 meters.

Tom Ryan, Saudi Cup Race Director, said the races and the horses competing in them had been selected to offer the most competitive spectacle possible for the estimated 10,000-12,000 expected to be watching at the racetrack itself and global television audiences.

World-renowned jockey Frankie Dettori also spoke at the event and described his experiences of running horses on the King Abdul Aziz dirt track.

“I’ve been very fortunate to have been going there for a number of years, and the quality of the dirt track in Riyadh is second to none, probably the best I’ve ridden on. 

“I’ve ridden European horses on it, and they take to it really well, and the new turf track will give the day even more appeal. 

“I’m sure this is going to attract a lot of interest from around the world, I hope I’ll be there on the starting line come February 29.”

Visa procedures for the event were also confirmed on Monday, with the Saudi Cup following a similar system used by recent sporting events hosted in Saudi Arabia. Racegoers who buy a ticket for the Saudi Cup will automatically receive a visa to enter the Kingdom.

Prince Bandar said: “In Saudi Arabia, we’ve had experience with Formula E and other such events, whether it is in hospitality or entertainment and we have no problem with accommodation for those involved with the horses or who wish to attend the event.

“We will also be providing programs and packages for people who wish to tour Saudi Arabia, whether it is for the archaeology, for nature, or the seas, deserts or mountains — we have everything accounted for.”